Find the word definition

Crossword clues for cope

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cope
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a coping strategy
▪ Therapists can show a child new coping strategies.
cope with an emergency (=succeed in dealing with an emergency)
▪ Do you think that you could cope with an emergency?
cope with demand (=satisfy demand)
▪ The existing services were not capable of coping with the demand for advice.
cope with/deal with stress
▪ People find different ways of dealing with stress.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
well
▪ They coped well with steady rain making me question the need for overtrousers in milder seasons.
▪ Do they cope well with stress?
▪ At a sensible pace, however, it copes well enough.
▪ Collaborative schools coped well with change, balancing it with the preservation of continuity, especially of values.
▪ She coped well with the peculiar pressures of being only an honorary man in a male world.
▪ Usually she could cope well enough.
▪ The public sector, after years of commercialisation, is not coping well.
▪ Quite sparky, she copes well under pressure, but it is not unknown for her to lose her temper.
■ NOUN
ability
▪ An extravagant signal could be a general statement of a male's ability to cope.
▪ Meanwhile doubts about the private banks' ability to cope caused mounting worries.
▪ Yet, as Margaret Donaldson points out, the ability to cope with disembedded tasks is crucial to educational success.
▪ Services should also aim to enhance the individual's own ability to cope with distress.
▪ As a result she was renowned for her ability to cope patiently with awkward guests.
▪ Coral species vary in their ability to cope with sediment.
▪ It was a combination that destroyed his ability to cope with life, and he sought psychiatric help in 1950.
▪ It's not only riding skills that count when considering a holiday, but the ability to cope in unfamiliar surroundings.
capacity
▪ Moreover, the large city or freight terminals had to have massive capacity to cope with intense seasonal pressures.
▪ One important feature of such factors is that they will tend to shape the person's capacity to cope with adverse circumstances.
change
▪ Planning also helps to produce a mechanism for coping with change and focuses attention and effort on key issues.
▪ We are coping with this change and that, but failing to enhance our capacity to manage change in general.
▪ Collaborative schools coped well with change, balancing it with the preservation of continuity, especially of values.
▪ To cope with these massive changes, entrepreneurial governments have begun to transform themselves.
▪ Whatever the fortunes of the major political parties, it is likely that managers will be coping with rapid change.
▪ Is the management of your venue adaptable enough to cope with changes in your programme or its timing?
▪ Central to our research are questions such as: how do design firms cope with strategic change?
▪ How do you cope with change?
child
▪ There's concern that schools may not realise what help is needed because the children seem to be coping in the classroom.
▪ Certainly, all children must develop coping and survival skills.
▪ At what age cam children cope with these conventions?
▪ It is these which, above all, give the children their ability to cope with a large repertoire.
▪ However, welcoming children and coping with them are quite separate qualities.
▪ And what's more, much can be done now to assist the child to cope with this.
demand
▪ In a year of recession, Land Rover is taking on more staff and increasing production to cope with the worldwide demand.
▪ In addition to their own emotional turmoil, parents must cope with the demands and expectations of those around them.
▪ There are few specialist clinics and those that do exist can not cope with the demand.
▪ My wife would need all the virtues in the world to cope with the demands of my life.
▪ If they have the resources and the foresight to cope with demand, you won't notice.
▪ However, the so-called Street v Mountford test fails to cope with the demands placed upon it by its own social context.
▪ The cinema even had a special computer installed to cope with the demand for bookings.
▪ Theodora wondered whether it was a room which could cope with the demands of the modern world.
difficulty
▪ For example, communes have difficulty in coping with adolescent children.
▪ He noted that several accidents appeared to highlight pilots' difficulties in coping with increasing flight-deck automation.
▪ The theory also has difficulty in coping with colour perception when a particular object may come in a number of colours.
▪ This much is perhaps to be expected from some one who faced insurmountable difficulties in coping with the work.
▪ Her brain was still having a great deal of difficulty coping with what her eyes were telling her.
▪ Her husband was described as having difficulty coping with her.
▪ Parents are seen as responsible for any difficulties in coping with their children.
▪ In that case you will have fewer rather than more difficulties with which to cope.
family
▪ The smaller family units can not cope with grandparents either in terms of money or space.
▪ The way the Steputis family coped by normalizing their life surely went a long way toward helping Hank maintain his personal integrity.
▪ A family attempts to cope with the eruption into their lives of an unruly aunt.
▪ All of these groups focus on helping family members cope when they have an alcoholic family member.
▪ How have your family coped with you heading off on these sometimes very dangerous expeditions?
▪ Mrs Jones' family say she's coping remarkably well, but they're horrified at her injuries.
▪ Could your family cope financially if you died unexpectedly?
illness
▪ Now Peter's family can get on with looking after him and coping with his illness without worrying about losing their home.
▪ Relatives have to cope with mental illness that so often changes the personality of their loved one.
▪ Health professionals, particularly doctors, find particular difficulty in coping with a disabling illness in adult life.
inability
▪ I do believe it wasn't just inability to cope with a terrible handicap.
▪ This indicates that drinking is often a response to an inability to cope with the many losses of old age.
▪ This was happening more and more, this inability to cope, this giving in to raw emotion whenever he was alone.
▪ It now made open confession of its inability to cope alone with the crisis initiated by Perry's arrival.
▪ But he demanded high standards and as a classical scholar was exasperated by my inability to cope with Latin.
▪ In such cases, illness can leave not only a physical inability to cope, but an emotional fear of doing so.
▪ There are many people who suffer due to lack of affordable housing to rent and inability to cope with mortgage repayments.
life
▪ These are difficult days for students ... financial worries and job uncertainty, as well as coping with life alone.
▪ His father, my ex-husband, was chronically depressed, just had a real bad time coping with life.
▪ They can't cope with real life and kill themselves.
▪ The way the Steputis family coped by normalizing their life surely went a long way toward helping Hank maintain his personal integrity.
▪ All three of them were adults now, supposedly able to cope with the crises life flung at them.
▪ Most often, the kids tell Nelson they need the cigarettes to cope with life.
▪ It was a combination that destroyed his ability to cope with life, and he sought psychiatric help in 1950.
▪ I couldn't cope with his life, that's what it was.
pressure
▪ Fiona Explains how she coped with pressure and David explains how everyone supported each other.
▪ There are also several studies being made of how otters are coping with the pressures that we are imposing on them.
▪ Moreover, the large city or freight terminals had to have massive capacity to cope with intense seasonal pressures.
▪ Quite sparky, she copes well under pressure, but it is not unknown for her to lose her temper.
▪ In particular it could not cope with the pressure of a growing population.
▪ If you use cigarettes to help you cope with pressure or to stay slim, you are probably particularly dependent on nicotine.
▪ But it is easier to cope with these pressures if we go back to first principles.
problem
▪ The main problem is coping with the aggression.
▪ Commercial attachés were not a complete answer to the problem of coping with the increasing volume and importance of economic diplomacy.
▪ Teenagers may begin to take drugs to help them escape from adolescent problems they can't cope with.
situation
▪ Fortunately her upbringing had given her the social training to cope with these situations.
▪ The managers were learning how to cope with situations beyond their control, a foundation for their future career.
▪ If you look at people who cope successfully with difficult situations, they often automatically think ahead and anticipate the circumstances.
▪ I am the person in the front who has to cope with whatever situation comes up.
▪ Fear can provide the adrenaline to cope with a new situation or emergency.
▪ Shouting to Wemyss to cope with this situation, Douglas wasted no time.
▪ The insurrection soon became so general that the government with its meager military forces could not cope with the situation.
stress
▪ Anxious clients can be taught to cope with stress.
▪ To survive, they learned to cope with the stresses associated with negative feedback and emotions.
▪ The problem is, how do you cope with stress?
▪ Do they cope well with stress?
▪ But coping with stress seems to be a dawdle for McBride.
▪ Some hospitals have programs to help their employees cope with the stress.
▪ Diverse ways of coping with the stress caused by illness will be identified and any links with self-esteem investigated.
▪ An early, major order of business was learning to cope with the stresses and intense emotions of becoming a manager.
system
▪ In heavy rain, the system can't cope and it floods.
▪ Early drilled crops have a greater and earlier nutrient demand and their root systems can cope better, he said.
▪ Could your system cope with warm food after what you've been used to?
▪ The concrete structure should be sufficiently dense to limit water ingress to ensure that the system can cope.
▪ Such overwintering vats should be as simple as possible: externally filtered zeolite somewhere in the system to cope with ammonia.
▪ Darlington council has a sophisticated computer system to cope with the poll tax process.
▪ I doubt if the schools system could cope with another overhaul to undo all the harm done.
way
▪ The best way to cope with such an enemy, he says, is to understand it.
▪ As we have discussed, Louisa favored an escape pattern as a way to cope with her problems.
▪ But government intervention is not the only way to cope with the problem of socially inefficient resource allocation due to externalities.
▪ And they will shape the way we cope with the future.
▪ In this final session Margaret was encouraged to explore possible ways of coping at times of further crises.
▪ Or he may surprise you with a novel way to cope.
▪ There are ways of coping with all these five kinds of events.
▪ It is his own mind's way of coping with the grief, and he knows it.
ways
▪ In this final session Margaret was encouraged to explore possible ways of coping at times of further crises.
▪ Your goal is to understand these natural tendencies and use your understanding to help her find better ways to cope.
▪ There are ways of coping with all these five kinds of events.
▪ There are two ways of coping with this disparity.
▪ Diverse ways of coping with the stress caused by illness will be identified and any links with self-esteem investigated.
▪ Time was also spent exploring the consequences of the overdose and finding alternative ways of coping with similar problems in the future.
▪ Throughout his year in Downing Street, Lord Home brooded on ways of coping more successfully with the pressures on government.
▪ But it does recognize the need for the educators to find ways of helping them cope.
■ VERB
design
▪ Because most submersible pumps are not designed to cope with solids.
▪ In 1928 a new Churchgate was designed, mainly to cope with suburban traffic.
▪ To be truly effective a system needs to be designed to cope with a wide range of inputs.
▪ Central to our research are questions such as: how do design firms cope with strategic change?
▪ Luminescence chambers are designed to cope with this and are tested up to specified voltages with metal targets as samples.
enable
▪ The pattern recognition technique enables the computer to cope with a certain amount of operator error, minor misspellings make no difference.
▪ The object of the decision is to arrive at responses which enable individuals to cope more adequately with their situation.
▪ Similarly, banks make merchandise loans to enable customers to cope with seasonal imports especially where bulk purchases might ensure considerable discounts.
▪ Their descendants are full of genes that enable them to cope with several antibiotics at once.
feel
▪ Drugs often make people feel they're coping, when they're really not coping at all.
▪ Though very sympathetic and sensitive to the needs of the birth family most adopters did not feel they could cope with contact.
▪ It was agreed that he might return to work from the hospital when he felt better able to cope.
▪ During the day he felt able to cope with any development, however disconcerting.
▪ Alternatively, it may be the strategy with which teachers feel most able to cope with the wide range of pupil attainment.
▪ You sound very depressed to me, and it's probably this that's making you feel unable to cope.
▪ The last thing she felt like coping with was a confrontation.
find
▪ They also find it hard to cope with men who are angry with them.
▪ Your goal is to understand these natural tendencies and use your understanding to help her find better ways to cope.
▪ And I've found it harder to cope with in the last two or three years.
▪ And most people I know find it easier to cope when they do not believe they are emotionally sick.
▪ One of the biggest problems Merena faced was finding tyres capable of coping with that speed for that length of time.
▪ The patient is chilly and irritable and finds it difficult to cope.
▪ Eileen wouldn't have found her easy to cope with.
▪ Home helps said they were finding it difficult to cope with the extra responsibility.
help
▪ The reporters have developed a morgue humour to help them to cope.
▪ Researchers have found that people rely upon their experience to help them understand and cope with new or stressful situations.
▪ It's based on the technology that was developed to help astronauts cope with weightlessness.
▪ Some hospitals have programs to help their employees cope with the stress.
▪ The fact is that you may need something to help you cope, sleep and carry on with your life.
▪ The therapist can provide structured behavioral, cognitive, or affective skills training to help clients successfully cope with these concerns.
learn
▪ It's now a question of learning to cope, and trying to get over everything.
▪ Above all, how would I learn to cope with the sub continental stare?
▪ Over the millennia, cultures have changed very substantially as they have learned to cope with environmental vicissitudes.
▪ The market dictated the price, and Salomon Brothers' traders learned to cope.
▪ Hector spent the winter learning how to cope with his blindness.
▪ The managers were learning how to cope with situations beyond their control, a foundation for their future career.
▪ George takes time to learn to cope with Lennie and matures a lot through the experience.
▪ Students may study how famous people learned to cope with and benefit from failure.
need
▪ The crossed poles structure gives the stability you need to cope with high winds, together with a good space to weight ration.
▪ Most often, the kids tell Nelson they need the cigarettes to cope with life.
▪ How many secure fields will be needed to cope with such a rotation?
▪ Babcock countered that the plant's operators had all the information that they needed to cope with the crisis.
▪ Secondly, the staff on the ward will themselves need assistance in coping with their own feelings about the tragedy.
▪ The highest professional standards are needed to cope with the complexity of issues.
seem
▪ At first it seemed impossible to cope with two employers with their contrasting attitudes towards money.
▪ He seemed to be coping better than I during these endless days.
▪ But the effort to combat her own sensual response seemed too much to cope with - slipping away far beyond her reach.
▪ She couldn't cope with it; couldn't seem to cope with anything any more.
▪ There's concern that schools may not realise what help is needed because the children seem to be coping in the classroom.
▪ In emotional terms, the boy in the television series seemed to cope admirably.
▪ Thank you for looking after on those really black days when even he seemed too much to cope with.
▪ At times, he seemed to have to cope single-handedly with everything that came from the Opposition.
struggle
▪ Everywhere you look there are operations cancelled, old people's homes closed down, and schools struggling to cope.
▪ The Turnbulls struggled to cope, whilst those in need from another country are given the red carpet treatment.
▪ As teams of temps struggled to cope with the mounting chaos, Jackson tried to keep the Equal Opportunities flame burning.
▪ Hospital staff struggled to cope with the numbers of casualties.
▪ Farmers are struggling to cope with an invasion of slugs.
▪ Three wards were packed, with two and three patients sharing some beds as doctors struggled to cope.
try
▪ People try to cope on their own.
▪ The child feels anxious and unsafe as she tries to cope with her parents' unpredictability.
▪ For the relief workers, trying to cope is an overwhelming ordeal.
▪ But it is fun for me to look up from my Sunday paper and watch them try to cope.
▪ That is a problem with which my right hon. and learned Friend is trying to cope.
▪ Several ministers of finance tried their hand at coping with the foreign and internal debt problem.
▪ At present many sheltered housing schemes are trying to cope with severe difficulties in relation to dementing tenants.
▪ As mentioned previously, the organization had been in a schizoid state in trying to cope with uncertainty in the marketplace.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He's doing an experiment to see how frogs cope in a gravity-free environment.
▪ It's a tough job but I'm sure he'll cope.
▪ People who cope successfully with difficult situations usually look ahead and anticipate the circumstances.
▪ The automatic sorting machines cannot always cope with colored envelopes.
▪ The family is coping as best as possible following the mother's disappearance.
▪ The kids were very young and it was difficult to cope financially.
▪ When I got back from holiday, I had an enormous backlog of work to cope with.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Foster parents were not always equipped to cope with the vagaries of their own children, let alone the problems of outsiders.
▪ In this final session Margaret was encouraged to explore possible ways of coping at times of further crises.
▪ Officials from one country told Ellena that its citizens had enough stress coping with high unemployment and other transition ills.
▪ Organizational environments are always uncertain, so departments that can cope effectively with uncertainty can increase their power within the organization.
▪ She may feel cautious about exploring certain themes in her pretend play such as coping with aggression.
▪ Some feel they are unable to cope and the child is taken into care with a view to fostering.
▪ These machines usually cope with two or three different sizes of pipe.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cope

Cope \Cope\, v. i. To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow. [Obs.]

Some bending down and coping toward the earth.
--Holland.

Cope

Cope \Cope\, v. t. (Falconry) To pare the beak or talons of (a hawk).
--J. H. Walsh.

Cope

Cope \Cope\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Coped (k[=o]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. Coping.] [OE. copen, coupen, to buy, bargain, prob. from D. koopen to buy, orig., to bargain. See Cheap.]

  1. To exchange or barter. [Obs.]
    --Spenser.

  2. To encounter; to meet; to have to do with.

    Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man As e'er my conversation coped withal.
    --Shak.

  3. To enter into or maintain a hostile contest; to struggle; to combat; especially, to strive or contend on equal terms or with success; to match; to equal; -- usually followed by with.

    Host coped with host, dire was the din of war.
    --Philips.

    Their generals have not been able to cope with the troops of Athens.
    --Addison.

Cope

Cope \Cope\ (k[=o]p), n. [A doublet of cape. See Cape, Cap.]

  1. A covering for the head. [Obs.]
    --Johnson.

  2. Anything regarded as extended over the head, as the arch or concave of the sky, the roof of a house, the arch over a door. ``The starry cope of heaven.''
    --Milton.

  3. An ecclesiastical vestment or cloak, semicircular in form, reaching from the shoulders nearly to the feet, and open in front except at the top, where it is united by a band or clasp. It is worn in processions and on some other occasions.
    --Piers plowman.

    A hundred and sixty priests all in their copes.
    --Bp. Burnet.

  4. An ancient tribute due to the lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in Derbyshire, England.

  5. (Founding) The top part of a flask or mold; the outer part of a loam mold.
    --Knight. De Colange.

Cope

Cope \Cope\, v. t.

  1. To bargain for; to buy. [Obs.]

  2. To make return for; to requite; to repay. [Obs.]

    three thousand ducats due unto the Jew, We freely cope your courteous pains withal.
    --Shak.

  3. To match one's self against; to meet; to encounter.

    I love to cope him in these sullen fits.
    --Shak.

    They say he yesterday coped Hector in the battle, and struck him down.
    --Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cope

late 14c., "come to blows with," from Old French couper, earlier colper "hit, punch," from colp "a blow" (see coup). Meaning evolved 17c. into "handle successfully," perhaps influenced by obsolete cope "to traffic" (15c.-17c.), a word in North Sea trade, from the Flemish version of the Germanic source of English cheap. Related: Coped; coping.

Wiktionary
cope

Etymology 1 vb. To deal effectively with something difficult. Etymology 2

n. 1 A long, loose cloak worn by a priest or bishop on ceremonial occasions. 2 Any covering such as a canopy or a mantle. 3 The "vault" or "canopy" of the skies, heavens etc. 4 (context construction English) A covering piece on top of a wall exposed to the weather, usually made of metal, masonry, or stone and sloped to carry off water. 5 (context foundry English) The top part of a sand casting mold. 6 An ancient tribute due to the lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in Derbyshire, England. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To cover (a joint or structure) with coping. 2 (context intransitive English) To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow. Etymology 3

vb. 1 (context obsolete English) To bargain for; to buy. 2 (context obsolete English) To exchange or barter. 3 (context obsolete English) To make return for; to requite; to repay. 4 (context obsolete English) To match oneself against; to meet; to encounter. 5 (context obsolete English) To encounter; to meet; to have to do with.

WordNet
cope

n. brick that is laid sideways at the top of a wall [syn: header, coping]

cope

v. come to terms or deal successfully with; "We got by on just a gallon of gas"; "They made do on half a loaf of bread every day" [syn: get by, make out, make do, contend, grapple, deal, manage]

Gazetteer
Cope, SC -- U.S. town in South Carolina
Population (2000): 107
Housing Units (2000): 46
Land area (2000): 0.247869 sq. miles (0.641977 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.247869 sq. miles (0.641977 sq. km)
FIPS code: 16720
Located within: South Carolina (SC), FIPS 45
Location: 33.377510 N, 81.007736 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 29038
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Cope, SC
Cope
Wikipedia
Cope

The cope (known in Latin as pluviale 'rain coat' or cappa 'cape') is a liturgical vestment, more precisely a long mantle or cloak, open in front and fastened at the breast with a band or clasp. It may be of any liturgical colour.

A cope may be worn by any rank of the clergy, and also by lay ministers in certain circumstances. If worn by a bishop, it is generally accompanied by a mitre. The clasp, which is often highly ornamented, is called a morse. In art, angels are often shown wearing copes, especially in Early Netherlandish painting.

Cope (film)

COPE is an 2007 psychological thriller/ horror independent film written and directed by Ronald Jerry and produced by Kitty Productions, a multimedia company based in Kodiak, Alaska.

COPE (BSA)

COPE is an acronym for Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience, a program in the Boy Scouts of America. It consists of group initiative games, trust events, and high and low ropes course. Some activities involve a group challenge, while others develop individual skills and agility. Participants climb, swing, balance, jump, rappel, and devise solutions to a variety of problems.

Cope (disambiguation)

A cope is a type of religious garment.

Cope may also refer to:

Cope (surname)

Cope is a surname, and may refer to

  • Sir Anthony Cope (c. 1486–1551)
  • Arthur C. Cope, American chemist
  • Bob Cope, American football coach
  • Charles West Cope, (1811–1890) English artist
  • Davey Cope, (1877–1898), South African rugby union player
  • David Cope, artificial intelligence and music researcher
  • David Cope (economist), British energy & resource economist
  • Derrike Cope, American racing driver
  • Edward Drinker Cope, American anatomist and palaeontologist
  • Edward Meredith Cope, English classical scholar
  • Frederick Cope, Canadian politician
  • Geoff Cope, English cricketer
  • George Cope (Tobacco manufacturer), English tobacco manufacturer
  • Jack Cope, South African writer
  • James Cope (UK politician), British MP and Resident to the Hanseatic League in the mid-eighteenth century
  • Jamie Cope, English snooker player
  • Jean-François Copé, French politician
  • Jim Cope (1911–1999), Australian politician
  • John Cope (British Army officer), English general during the 1745 Jacobite Uprising
  • John Cope, Baron Cope of Berkeley, English politician
  • Julian Cope, English musician
  • Kenneth Cope, English actor
  • Kenneth Cope (musician), American composer
  • Kit Cope, American martial arts fighter
  • Marianne Cope, American nun and Catholic saint
  • Mike Cope, American racing driver
  • Myron Cope, American radio personality
  • Peter Cope, American test pilot
  • Thomas Cope (1827-1884), English tobacco manufacturer
  • Thomas D. Cope, American historian and physicist
  • Warner Cope, American judge
  • Wendy Cope, English poet
  • Zachary Cope, English physician and surgeon
COPE (gene)

Coatomer subunit epsilon is a protein that in humans is encoded by the COPE gene.

Cope (Freeland album)

Cope (stylized as COPE™) is the second studio album by English DJ and record producer Adam Freeland. It was released on 8 June 2009 by Marine Parade Records. Freeland worked with Alex Metric and collaborated with artists, such as Kurt Baumann, Brody Dalle, Gerald Casale, John Ceparano and Kim Field, who contributed vocals to songs on the album.

Cope (song)

"Cope" is a song written and performed by Gigolo Aunts. Originally available as the B-side to the independently released 1991 " Bloom" 7" single, it was released as a single in its own right in October 1992 on Fire Records and later appeared on the Gigolo Aunts' album Flippin' Out. In support of that album, it was released as a promo single in the US in 1994 by RCA/BMG. The promo single includes a cover of "Winsor Dam", a 1991 recording by Big Dipper that did not receive its formal release until the 2008 compilation album, "Supercluster: The Big Dipper Anthology". Note that while the single attributes the writing credits for "Winsor Dam" to Goffrier/Oliphant/Michener/Waleik, other sources identify the writer of the song as Big Dipper guitarist, Gary Waleik.

Cope (Manchester Orchestra album)

Cope is the fourth studio album from Atlanta-based indie rock band Manchester Orchestra. It was released on April 1, 2014 through Loma Vista Recordings and the band's own independent label, Favorite Gentlemen. The album was self-produced alongside their long-time collaborating partner Dan Hannon, and mixed by John Agnello at Fluxivity Studios in Brooklyn. The album's first single, "Top Notch", was released on January 20, 2014. The album's second single, "Every Stone", was released on February 25, 2014.

Usage examples of "cope".

Smoking, like all drug addiction, is a tug-of-war of fear: the fear of what the drug is doing to us, and the fear of not being able to enjoy or cope with life without it.

One of those sudden storms of summer had blown up from the sea, and Peggy knew enough of Long Island weather to know that these disturbances were usually accompanied by terrific winds--squalls and gusts that no aeroplane yet built or thought of could hope to cope with.

I shall put on about twenty kilos - I have a suit and shirt designed to cope with the excess avoirdupois -fatten my cheeks, tint hair and moustache, wear a sinister scar and a black leather glove.

She was trying to cope with the wrenching blow Hobart Batt had unwittingly delivered.

Fassin was vaguely aware of it as the pressure on his chest and flesh and limbs faded away over the course of a few seconds, replacing that feeling of oppression with a sensation of sudden blood-roaring bloatedness as his body struggled to cope with the change.

I stood there a long time, one foot upon the coping and my chin upon my hand, noting the beauty of the ruined town and wondering how such a feeble race as that which lay about, breakfasting in the limpid sunshine, could have come by a city like this, or kept even the ruins of its walls and buildings from the covetousness of others, until presently there was a rustle of primrose garments and my friend of the day before stood by me.

The cenote lay below a ridge which was thickly covered in trees and Rider was worried about the problem of getting in while coping with air currents.

Fieldwork by Cope, Marsh, and their collectors led to the uncovering of the first specimens of sauropod and ceratopsian dinosaurs.

Although Marsh maintained collectors at Como Bluff until 1889, and profited from later discoveries of ceratopsian dinosaurs in other locations in Wyoming and Colorado, the nature of his dispute with Cope had changed by the late 1870s.

Who watched his progress with great admiration once she had coped with the shock of his cutting her.

Yes, we had Catilina skulking in the background ready to demolish our fair city, but he and I coped with that, he and I saved our country!

Cope came to meet him, and registered deep surprise when he realized who Dacre was.

British women, formerly ladies of leisure employing cooks, dhobis and ayas, found themselves coping with all the tasks usually performed by these servants.

Aurelia would cope with the change from landlady of a thriving insula to doyenne of the closest thing Rome had to a palace.

Caesar had wondered how Aurelia would cope with the change from landlady of a thriving insula to doyenne of the closest thing Rome had to a palace.