Find the word definition

Crossword clues for cheers

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
cheers
interjection
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a crowd cheers (=shouts to show praise, support etc)
▪ The crowd cheered as the team came onto the pitch.
an audience cheers
▪ The audience cheered loudly when he came on stage.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
three cheers for sb!
▪ Three cheers for Coach Madison!
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
cheers

salute or toast when taking a drink, British, 1919, from plural of cheer (also see cheerio). Earlier it is recorded as a shout of support or encouragement (1720).

Wiktionary
cheers

interj. 1 A common toast used when drinking in company. 2 (context British informal English) goodbye 3 (context British Australian NZ informal English) thank you n. (plural of cheer English) vb. (en-third-person singular of: cheer)

Wikipedia
Cheers

Cheers is an American sitcom that ran for eleven seasons between 1982 and 1993. The show was produced by Charles/Burrows/Charles Productions in association with Paramount Network Television for NBC and created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. The show is set in a bar named Cheers (named after its real life counterpart) in Boston, Massachusetts, where a group of locals meet to drink, relax, and socialize. The show's main theme song, written and performed by Gary Portnoy, and co-written with Judy Hart Angelo, lent its famous refrain " Where Everybody Knows Your Name" as the show's tagline.

After premiering on September 30, 1982, it was nearly canceled during its first season when it ranked almost last in ratings for its premiere (74th out of 77 shows). Cheers, however, eventually became a highly rated television show in the United States, earning a top-ten rating during eight of its eleven seasons, including one season at number one. The show spent most of its run on NBC's Thursday night " Must See TV" lineup. Its widely watched series finale was broadcast on May 20, 1993, and the show's 270 episodes have been successfully syndicated worldwide. Nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series for all eleven of its seasons on the air, it earned 28 Emmy Awards from a record of 117 nominations. The character Frasier Crane ( Kelsey Grammer) was featured in his eponymous spin-off show, which aired until 2004 and included guest appearances by virtually all of the major and minor Cheers characters.

During its run, Cheers became one of the most popular series of all time and has received critical acclaim. In 1997, the episodes " Thanksgiving Orphans" and " Home Is the Sailor", aired originally in 1987, were respectively ranked No. 7 and No. 45 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time. In 2002, Cheers was ranked No. 18 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time. In 2013, the Writers Guild of America ranked it as the eighth best written TV series and TV Guide ranked it #11 on their list of the 60 Greatest Shows of All Time.

Cheers (album)

Cheers is the debut studio album by rapper Obie Trice, released on September 23, 2003 after he was signed to Shady Records in 2000. The title track "Cheers" celebrates Obie's successful debut into the rap game after being in the Detroit underground for many years. The album's title is a homage to the long running NBC sitcom of the same name, and the album cover features a logo similar to that used on the show.

The album consists of 17 tracks, with executive production from Eminem, and additional production by Dr. Dre, Timbaland, Mike Elizondo, Emile, Fredwreck and Denaun Porter. Artists featuring on Cheers include Busta Rhymes, D12, Dr. Dre, Nate Dogg, 50 Cent, Lloyd Banks, Timbaland, and Tony Yayo

Topics Obie has touched on this album include his life on the streets of Detroit, problems with his mother, relationships with women and the soulful reminder that, despite having made it into the mainstream, he has not forgotten his friends.

The album debuted at number 5 on the Billboard 200 with 226,000 copies sold in its first week and has sold over 2 million worldwide

Cheers (disambiguation)

Cheers is an American television sitcom.

Cheers or CHEERS may also refer to:

Cheers (Spain)

Cheers is the Spanish version of the original series. It was produced by Plural Entertainment and Tom Collins and broadcast by Telecinco. It was first aired on 11 September 2011. It follows the same theme as Cheers.

Cheers (season 5)

The fifth season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 25, 1986 and May 7, 1987. This season marks the departure of Shelley Long as Diane Chambers, bringing an end to the Sam and Diane relationship (although Long would return for the series finale). The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles (as Charles Burrows Charles Productions), in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 6)

The sixth season of Cheers is an award-winning American television situation comedy set in a Boston bar called "Cheers". It originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 24, 1987 and May 7, 1988. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under their production company Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television. This season features the debut of Kirstie Alley as Rebecca Howe.

Cheers (Drink to That)

"Cheers (Drink to That)" is a song recorded by Barbadian recording artist Rihanna, from her fifth studio album, Loud (2010). The song impacted US mainstream and rhythmic radio on August 2, 2011, as the seventh and final single released from Loud. The song was written by Andrew Harr, Jermaine Jackson, Stacy Barthe, LP, Corey Gibson, Chris Ivery, Lauren Christy, Graham Edwards, Avril Lavigne and Scott Spock, while production of the song was completed by Harr and Jackson under their stage name, The Runners. The song also contains samples from Lavigne's song " I'm with You", which is featured on her debut album Let Go (2002). Lyrically, "Cheers (Drink to That)" is a party-drinking song, with multiple references to drinking alcohol, including Jameson Irish Whiskey.

The song has received positive reviews from music critics, who praised the interpolation of Lavigne's "I'm with You" and also commented that it would be a successful club song due to its lyrical content. "Cheers (Drink to That)" peaked inside the top ten in New Zealand and Australia, and charted at numbers 5 and 6, respectively. The song also peaked at number 7 on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, becoming the singer's nineteenth top ten song on the chart. The music video for the song, directed by Evan Rogers and Ciara Pardo, shows footage of Rihanna on tour and different activities during her homecoming trip to Barbados. "Cheers (Drink to That)" was included on the set list of the Loud Tour (2011).

Cheers (season 1)

The first season of Cheers, an American television sitcom, originally aired in the United States on NBC between September 30, 1982, and March 31, 1983, in 22 episodes. The show was created and produced by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles, who previously worked on Taxi, another sitcom. Cheers was produced by Charles Burrows Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television. The concept and production design of the show were inspired by a public house in Boston, the Bull & Finch, which is now called Cheers Beacon Hill.

When it was first broadcast, critics praised the series as intelligent, sophisticated, cleverly written, well-cast, and well-timed. However, the Nielsen ratings for its original runs were very low. Typically, low ratings result in a show's cancellation, but before the season finale aired, the network renewed it for another season. Reruns of season 1 scored higher ratings than its first airing and the series earned award recognitions, including five Emmy Award wins in 1983. In later years, this season has still elicited positive reviews and is currently available on DVD.

Cheers (season 2)

The second season of Cheers, an American situation comedy television series, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 29, 1983, and May 10, 1984, with 22 episodes. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles, and was produced by Charles Burrows Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television. The second season has been released on DVD as a four-disc set.

The show won Emmy Awards, including one for Outstanding Comedy Series, in 1983 and 1984. Critical reception was mostly positive, with negative commentary about the extended romance between Sam and Diane.

Cheers (season 3)

The third season of Cheers, an American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 27, 1984, and May 9, 1985. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions in association with Paramount Television. The third season is available on DVD in a four-disc set.

The season marks major events that affected, or could have affected, the show. Kelsey Grammer made his debut as psychiatrist Frasier Crane, intended as part of a love triangle with Sam and Diane for the season. Actresses Rhea Perlman and Shelley Long were pregnant; Perlman's pregnancy was written into her character ( Carla Tortelli), while Long's was hidden to avoid effects on her character ( Diane Chambers). This was the final season for Nicholas Colasanto as Coach Ernie Pantusso; Colasanto died of a heart condition (dating back to the 1970s) which worsened during production, contributing to his absence from a number of episodes before his death in February 1985.

Cheers (season 7)

The seventh season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between October 27, 1988 and May 4, 1989. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 8)

The eighth season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 21, 1989 and May 3, 1990. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 9)

The ninth season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 20, 1990, and May 3, 1991. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 10)

The tenth season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 19, 1991, and May 14, 1992. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 4)

The fourth season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 26, 1985, and May 15, 1986, as part of the network's Must See TV Thursday lineup. This season marks Woody Harrelson's television debut as Woody Boyd after Nicholas Colasanto, who portrayed Coach Ernie Pantusso, died during the previous season. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles, under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (season 11)

The eleventh and final season of Cheers, an award-winning American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 24, 1992, and May 20, 1993. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Cheers (proa)

Cheers was a proa sailboat designed by Dick Newick in 1967. It was one the earliest designs in his career, which contributed substantially to the revival of multihull vessels from the 1960s to the late 20th century. Like a traditional proa, Cheers had no bow or stern and could sail in either direction.

Usage examples of "cheers".

Mocking cheers greeted him from the members of both bands, who were sitting at separated tables, as was the rule for tours.

It went on that way, each sentence interrupted by cheers and applause, as Baraka told how the men had found out plans for a sneak Israeli attack on Lobynia with atomic pistols, and they set out deep into the heartland of Israel, even into Tel Aviv, and foiled the plan and laid much of that city waste before they were finally overwhelmed by the entire Israeli army.

AMERICAN INSURRECTION Soon after the game, the cheers still ringing in his ears, Barnett phoned Robert Kennedy and called off the decoy plan.

They drove from the battleground to the ecstatic cheers of the British.

A number of men were now seen to quit the boats, and then followed three hearty English cheers, leaving no further doubts of the character of the party.

Alain put an arm around her to support her and, with cheers and lewd suggestions ringing out behind them, helped her in over the threshold.

As she disappeared there again arose the mingled uproar of cheers and groans.