Find the word definition

Crossword clues for brush

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
brush
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a brush fire (=a very large fire in an area of grass)
▪ There were frequent brush fires during the hot dry summers.
as daft as a brush (=extremely silly)
▪ She’s as daft as a brush.
brush off/wash off/clean off the dirt
▪ Wash the dirt off those boots before you come in.
brush your teeth (also clean your teeth British English)
▪ I brush my teeth twice a day.
brush/comb your hair
▪ He cleaned his teeth and brushed his hair.
brushed aside
▪ He brushed aside criticisms of his performance.
clothes brush
scrubbing brush
shaving brush
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
broad
▪ In any case, the way forward has been mapped with only the broadest of brushes.
daft
▪ All the pick-ups you've mentioned are daft as a brush.
dampened
▪ Cut out long thin strips for trimming around the top edge of the boat and fix on with a dampened paint brush.
▪ Secure the head to the body with a dampened brush. 7 Shape the remaining white icing into hands and feet.
▪ Secure the feet with a dampened brush to the front of the cake.
fine
▪ Winsor &038; Newton Gold no4 short flat fine hog brush.
▪ The pollen of one flower is transferred to another by means of a fine brush.
▪ Any visible glue line can be disguised with enamel, applied with a fine camel-hair brush.
▪ Grasses are applied in fine, light lines using a fine brush loaded with acrylic paint.
▪ This is established with a fine brush.
▪ Brightly paint the towel using blue and green food colourings and a fine paint brush.
▪ Try using a fine sable rigger brush which will make very precise lines, although this does require patience!
▪ Use a fine artist's brush to touch in sports of bare metal, scratches and chips with a metal primer.
scrub
▪ We follow a number of faint tracks that disappear on the flat and run into barriers of scrub brush and trees.
scrubbing
▪ She used the soap, but not the scrubbing brush.
▪ I can't quite picture Veronica down on her knees with a scrubbing brush.
▪ Another is a yogi on the scrubbing brush.
shaving
▪ She picked up the ivory-handled shaving brush which rested next to them, and felt the softness of its bristles against her face.
small
▪ A small revolving brush on the front was sweeping dust into a slot.
▪ The California Department of Forestry said the crash sparked a small brush fire that was quickly extinguished.
▪ Then smudge downwards towards the lashes, using a cotton bud or a small brush.
▪ Better to remove the sprayer and use a cotton swab or small artist brush.
▪ An irrelevant monoclonal antibody, J13, to human small intestinal brush border membranes served as a negative control.
▪ Lightly sand scratches and chips with fine wet-and-dry paper, and remove all traces of rust with small wire brush.
▪ When the vaporised lead cooled, it was collected by small boys with brushes and shovels.
▪ A stiff yard broom and a small stiff hand brush will remove most of the debris.
soft
▪ Use a soft bristle brush to loosen the grime and if possible a sprayer to wash it all off.
▪ The colour was thinned with water to the consistency of cream and applied with soft synthetic haired brushes.
▪ Imagine dusting each bud with a soft brush and malathion dust!
▪ Even a soft body brush can feel uncomfortable if the bristles are stuck into the skin.
▪ Clean dentures with a soft brush and soap and water after every meal and leave them in water overnight.
▪ Loosen dust and debris from the motherboard and expansion cards with a soft bristle brush.
▪ Brush away surplus after application, using a big, soft powder brush.
▪ We could brush the horse with a soft brush: it will do both of us good!
stiff
▪ Scrub away any residue with water and a stiff brush.
▪ The vacuum cleaner was welcomed at first because it meant no longer having to do the stairs with a stiff brush.
▪ Churn or utility brush: A short handled, stiff bristled brush shaped for use in awkward areas and for general cleaning.
▪ A stiff yard broom and a small stiff hand brush will remove most of the debris.
■ NOUN
border
▪ An irrelevant monoclonal antibody, J13, to human small intestinal brush border membranes served as a negative control.
▪ More recent investigations with rat jejunal brush border membrane vesicles, however, have found evidence only for passive transport.
bristle
▪ Use a soft bristle brush to loosen the grime and if possible a sprayer to wash it all off.
▪ Loosen dust and debris from the motherboard and expansion cards with a soft bristle brush.
▪ Use a good quality bristle brush - find one in your local health food shop.
▪ Wet hair tends to stretch and break and is very vulnerable so never use a bristle brush on hair when wet.
▪ Accumulations of dust can be removed with a small vacuum cleaner after loosening with a dry, soft bristle brush.
▪ I find that bristle brushes are the best.
▪ After removal, accentuate with the help of a round bristle brush.
fire
▪ It is more likely, however, that it represents a short period of dry climate when there were frequent brush fires.
▪ When I met with Burke in his office last week, he was stamping out the latest political brush fire.
▪ By this point, I am doing a meltdown that makes Three Mile Island look like a brush fire.
▪ The California Department of Forestry said the crash sparked a small brush fire that was quickly extinguished.
hair
▪ Polly was standing in the middle of the floor, her hair brush raised above her head.
paint
▪ Using a paint brush paint blue eyes and whiskers on to the rabbit's face and pink ears and a nose.
▪ The rain began to fall, big sloppy drops as if some one were shaking out a paint brush.
▪ Classical painters developed the use of animal hair, and the paint brush, as we know it, was born.
▪ Then sprinkle on water and re-trowel in come loose-use an emulsion paint brush.
▪ Finally, draw a moistened paint brush along the junctions of cove and backgrounds.
▪ Whichever substance you use, put it on in as concentrated a form as you can using a large paint brush.
▪ Additionally, paint brushes can be cleaned in water.
▪ Cut out long thin strips for trimming around the top edge of the boat and fix on with a dampened paint brush.
stroke
▪ Her brush strokes mimic the uncertainty.
▪ Every brush stroke told a story.
▪ From the corner of my eye, I saw my frightened cousins obediently practicing their first brush strokes.
wire
▪ If the flashing looks sound but is obviously porous, clean the surface thoroughly with a wire brush.
▪ Keep a wire brush handy for this purpose and rub down the grill after finishing your cooking.
▪ Action with a scraper and wire brush, using manual labour, would give the desired result.
▪ Lightly sand scratches and chips with fine wet-and-dry paper, and remove all traces of rust with small wire brush.
▪ We would imagine that the wire brush is very handy for cleaning up old iron and steel.
▪ The inside of the fitting should be brushed out with a special wire brush and rubbed with wire wool.
■ VERB
apply
▪ Organic paints are often applied with a brush after the pot has been fired.
▪ Apparently, sophistication and ennui can be easily applied with a brush.
▪ Choose matt lipsticks for staying power; apply with a brush, working colour from outer to inner lip.
▪ The felt is nailed to the block and sizing is applied with a brush to give the hat some stiffness.
▪ Special fabric paint is applied using a stencil brush and then the design is fixed permanently by pressing with an iron.
▪ It is applied with a brush, sponge or pad, left for a few minutes, and then rinsed off.
clean
▪ Less than half an hour later she cleaned the brush in white spirit and pressed the lid of the tin noiselessly down.
▪ As the man got up:, the barber cleaned him with a brush.
▪ She carefully cleaned her brushes and put away the paints, then realised she was very hungry.
feel
▪ The boy could feel Izzie's body brush past him as she crawled into a corner.
▪ Of feeling the brush with power, and the greed of pushing defeat on to another child.
▪ She could feel the warm brush of his breath and smell the maleness of him.
▪ Thinly washed colour was applied, then blended with the brush and pushed around until it felt right.
pick
▪ She picked up a brush and began to attack her hair.
▪ Tom picked up a brush and moistened it in the turpentine cup.
▪ Léonie picked up the brush and got going on her cousin's hair.
put
▪ When Leo put the brush and pan into her arms, she blinked up at him, startled out of her thoughts.
▪ I think she smiled thinly, said little, and later put the brush in a drawer.
▪ I have put away my brushes for ever, he said.
▪ I put the brush on the side and carry on smoothing her hair with just my hands.
tar
▪ By 1952 he was becoming all the more determined that the United States should not be tarred with the colonial brush.
▪ I was tarred with the same brush, to a certain extent.
use
▪ Always make sure you clean your teeth properly, using a small-headed brush and only a pea-sized blob of toothpaste.
▪ I brush my hair 100 strokes at a skirted dressing table, using a silver-backed brush.
▪ If varnishing a floor, use a 6in brush or even a roller.
▪ Paul Collins uses various brushes, portable easels and aluminum frames to keep his canvas stretched.
▪ The dust is diabolical - at one stage you could be fired for using a sweeping brush and not a vacuum.
▪ Glaze the tarts lightly with the reduced syrup, using a pastry brush, and bake 10 minutes.
▪ I never find myself, fatigue in the voice, reminding Flaubert to hang up the bathmat or use the lavatory brush.
▪ Whichever substance you use, put it on in as concentrated a form as you can using a large paint brush.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
be/get tarred with the same brush
sweep/brush sth under the carpet
▪ Refuse to sweep difficulties under the carpet but sort things out even when it is painful.
▪ We knew that it wouldn't just go away if we swept it under the carpet.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a brush fire
▪ I'll just give my hair a quick brush.
▪ I felt the brush of her sleeve as she walked past.
▪ Use a wire brush to remove the rust.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ By 1952 he was becoming all the more determined that the United States should not be tarred with the colonial brush.
▪ He cut brush and cleared fields of heavy stones.
▪ It's recommended that these are used in conjunction with brushes to keep them from clogging.
▪ Paint on your lip shape with a matching pink lip pencil, or use a brush with pink lipstick.
▪ Suddenly a barrier of logs and brush blocked his path.
▪ Titanium white colour from Brera, Maimeri; no8 Bristlewhite brushes.
▪ When I met with Burke in his office last week, he was stamping out the latest political brush fire.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
aside
▪ Emanuel Shinwell's rhetoric, and the arguments which Crosland himself had developed in his writing, could not be brushed aside.
▪ He related how the fathers repeatedly brushed aside his request to be released.
▪ Corbett courteously thanked his hosts and, gently brushing aside their invitations, insisted on leaving at once.
▪ Holmes brushed aside an offer to wait, and we descended a set of echoing stone stairs.
▪ And when a problem can not be brushed aside, then a scapegoat must be found.
▪ All the assurances that the treaty would not inaugurate an arms race or cost the United States anything were brushed aside.
▪ She was brushing aside her own contribution, saying it was one thing to be seen but another to do something positive.
▪ But he brushed aside charges that government overspending, corruption and its seizure of farms are to blame.
away
▪ He emerged, shaken and slightly puzzled, long hair filled with leaves which he brushed away.
▪ This means, in the two preview episodes, brushing away canons of ethics like cobwebs.
▪ He frowned, screwed up his mouth and brushed away the letter.
▪ It is easy enough to imagine brushing away a meter or so of dry dust covering an ice deposit.
▪ Biting hard on her lower lip, Isabel brushed away a traitorous tear.
▪ Her body was unusually still and a fly had settled on her cheek, which she did not try to brush away.
▪ After comforting the little girl and brushing away her tears, Laura had taken the children upstairs to the nursery.
▪ Odysseus knew him too and brushed away a tear.
back
▪ Sleek city style is waved and brushed back into a soft full shape for casual dressing.
▪ Her dark hair is brushed back in a short, stylish cut.
▪ He was thick-set, with thinning hair brushed back, a magnificent walrus moustache and several missing teeth.
▪ She brushed back her hair, which had fallen over her eyes.
▪ She couldn't speak, could not even think while his thumb was brushing back and forth across her mouth like that.
▪ She rose suddenly and brushed back the tears, crying would get her nowhere.
▪ Her hair was snow-white and brushed back into a neat bun.
gently
▪ Placing his hand on the top of Joe's thigh, he gently brushed his knuckles against the man's groin.
▪ Corbett courteously thanked his hosts and, gently brushing aside their invitations, insisted on leaving at once.
▪ When completely dry, gently brush the surface to align the fibres.
▪ One of its paws gently brushed Lowell's neck, a feather-light touch, the claws neatly encased in fur.
▪ The prod is not to be confused with the caress which gently brushes a surface.
lightly
Lightly brush with one tablespoon of melted butter, bake for 5-8 minutes until just soft.
▪ Make the egg wash by whisking the egg and the water thoroughly together, and lightly brush the mixture on the dough.
▪ He moved to touch her arms and she lightly brushed his lips with hers.
▪ Put cookies on prepared sheets. Brush lightly with buttermilk and sprinkle with the remaining cup coconut and powdered sugar.
▪ He shifted his weight so that his body brushed lightly against hers.
▪ Up again, under his chin, now lightly brushing his mouth.
▪ To finish the roses, lightly brush green colouring around edge of each petal.
Lightly brush the surface with water.
off
▪ Unshielded babies clinging to teats would soon be brushed off.
▪ They brush off Elijah and board the ship, but they see no sign of the mysterious figures they saw boarding earlier.
▪ But Hughes is hoping to brush off the knock in time to face League champions Leeds on Sunday.
▪ Sprinkle on talcum powder, cornmeal or cornstarch; leave for two days; brush off.
▪ The mortar should be dry enough to brush off the paving without staining the slabs.
▪ He did not want to run the risk of being brushed off.
▪ New Zealands should be brushed off, hosed down and dried before you put them away for the summer.
▪ And it should be even easier to brush off the next three opponents.
up
▪ For the province's future Olympic hopefuls have been brushing up on skills both on and off the sports fields.
▪ Walking through a crowded school hallway or playground is daunting because it means brushing up against so many bodies.
▪ Did I make any deals, brush up any publishing contacts?
▪ Public libraries frequently have computers that people can use to brush up on their skills.
▪ I have already said how little I knew about cancer, and I now began to brush up on it.
▪ Start at your feet and use long sweeping movements and even pressure, from knees to thighs. then brush up towards armpit.
▪ The guide can be used an introduction to the hobby or as a means to brush up skills.
■ NOUN
carpet
▪ She had not heard the door as it softly brushed the carpet.
▪ Because both sides of the political divide are benefiting from the traffic, the issue is brushed under the carpet.
▪ Two uniformed men were on their hands and knees, brushing at the carpet with their fingers.
cheek
▪ When he brushed his cheek against hers or supported her waist in multiple pirouettes the sensual heat was unmissable.
▪ The great thick braid of spun metal hung over her shoulder, and brushed his cheek as she leaned over him.
▪ A spider the size of her thumbnail dropped past her in the gloom, its legs brushing her cheek.
▪ Death had brushed Dustin's cheek twice, threatening to take him first by fire and secondly by a bomb.
▪ The rough tweed of his jacket brushed her cheek and she caught the scent of soap and his aftershave.
▪ A rough chin brushing his cheek.
▪ Michele's lips brushed first one cheek then the other, his tongue-tip gathering the twin tears.
▪ No sigh of wind brushed David's cheek in the silence.
crumb
▪ He had brushed the crumbs from his desk top into his wastebasket.
▪ The historian brushed crumbs from the tablecloth.
▪ Balor had unbuttoned his jerkin and brushed the crumbs from his front and was preparing to take a snooze.
dust
▪ She brushed dust off the toe.
▪ She stopped for a moment to brush the dust from her hands and clothes and set off back to the house.
▪ He brushed a speck of dust from his sleeve as he waited for the silence he required.
▪ He brushed dust from his sleeve and headed towards the flight of stone steps that led up to the embankment.
face
▪ She cleaned her face, brushed her hair.
▪ I washed my face and brushed my teeth.
finger
▪ Run your fingers through your partner's hair several times, allowing your fingers to brush the scalp. 3.
▪ Jack's fingers brushed against her skin as her shirt fell open and he felt her shiver gently at his touch.
foot
▪ Maura pulled her to her feet and began to brush down Margaret's uniform, which was covered in grey dust.
▪ Instinctively he waved it from his face before getting to his feet and brushing it from the lapels of his overcoat.
hair
▪ Thick, immaculately cut ash-blonde hair brushed the padded silk shoulders of a black and white striped Roland Klein suit.
▪ Thick, long silver-gray hair, brushed straight back, covered his well-shaped head.
▪ He was thick-set, with thinning hair brushed back, a magnificent walrus moustache and several missing teeth.
▪ Undaunted, he began nibbling her earlobe, as fine strands of hair brushed his face.
▪ The hairs on his forearm brushed hers, he sat so close.
▪ Fourth Aunt knelt silently, her hair brushing the ground.
▪ Her face was washed and her hair brushed.
▪ Her dark hair is brushed back in a short, stylish cut.
hand
▪ Her hands brushed the keys, her head began to nod, then her body to tremble.
▪ She leans over his shoulder to follow the music; her hand brushes his arm when she turns a page.
▪ Two weeks ago we were given hand brushes to dust the machines in front of us.
▪ As she raised a trembling hand to brush them away she heard him swearing softly under his breath.
▪ As she reached up to pat his leg, the side of her hand brushed mine where I held him.
▪ Then hold the ear up over the head with one hand and carefully brush the hair down.
▪ Her hands brush unexpected surfaces, she steps across unfamiliar thresholds.
head
▪ I lift the long curls from my head and brush some life back into my flattened hair.
▪ He patted my head, brushing his fingers across my ear, and I jerked away.
▪ I really liked it, the way she moved my head and brushed her fingers through my hair.
▪ Turning his head, he brushed his lips against her brow in silent question.
lip
▪ She squirmed, but only until his lips brushed hers.
▪ Our lips brushed, but our tongues did not mingle.
▪ A moment later her arms were twining round his neck as his lips brushed hers as soft as gossamer.
▪ Biting hard on her lower lip, Isabel brushed away a traitorous tear.
▪ Michele's lips brushed first one cheek then the other, his tongue-tip gathering the twin tears.
mouth
▪ He frowned, screwed up his mouth and brushed away the letter.
▪ His mouth plundered hers, brushing her lips, forcing entry with his tongue, demanding, demanding all the while.
▪ She kept her head down, let her mouth brush the fibres of the carpet, caked with mud and dust.
question
▪ That helped his hangover, too, but he couldn't so easily brush off the questions about Katherine.
shoulder
▪ Thick, immaculately cut ash-blonde hair brushed the padded silk shoulders of a black and white striped Roland Klein suit.
▪ I could stand beside her as she fixed dinner, but if I brushed her shoulder she edged apart.
▪ They jangled when she moved and brushed her creamy shoulders each time she turned her head.
▪ The bobbed hair had grown and was brushing her shoulders.
tear
▪ She absently brushed the tears from her cheeks and sniffed.
▪ Odysseus knew him too and brushed away a tear.
▪ Biting hard on her lower lip, Isabel brushed away a traitorous tear.
▪ After comforting the little girl and brushing away her tears, Laura had taken the children upstairs to the nursery.
▪ She brushed away the tear that she'd been totally unaware was slowly trickling down her face.
▪ She rose suddenly and brushed back the tears, crying would get her nowhere.
▪ Luce put the diary down and brushed away her tears.
tooth
▪ Slowly brush two teeth at a time, using small circular movements.
▪ Even little boy Isopo brushes his teeth.
▪ However deep the trouble, dinner, like brushing your teeth, had to happen.
▪ When the vomiting stopped, he brushed his teeth.
▪ She brushes her teeth with fluoride, but spits to deter the Evil Eye.
▪ We managed to insert it into the schools: conflict resolution becomes as ordinary as brushing your teeth.
▪ After brushing her teeth Polly struggled into the tracksuit she had brought along to double as a bathrobe.
▪ Eat a clove of garlic in the bathroom in the guise of brushing your teeth.
■ VERB
begin
▪ He began brushing again. ` Huh!
▪ I began brushing my hair, but when it came time to braid it up, I rebelled.
▪ I have already said how little I knew about cancer, and I now began to brush up on it.
▪ I began brushing it off, but as quickly as I did so, it settled again.
▪ Maura pulled her to her feet and began to brush down Margaret's uniform, which was covered in grey dust.
let
▪ She would let me brush her hair some days.
▪ Just let me brush your hair back and put on this Alice band.
▪ She kept her head down, let her mouth brush the fibres of the carpet, caked with mud and dust.
▪ She lets me brush her hair sometimes.
reach
▪ Huy looked at her, reaching over to brush a last detail of natron away from her face.
▪ From a decade of cobwebs and dyed glass she felt old leaf-like hands reach out and brush her.
stand
▪ I stand up and brush my coat down.
▪ I stood up and brushed myself off.
▪ The man with the kidney lips folded his knife and stood up and brushed the whittle shavings out of his lap.
▪ Jinju stood up, brushed the dirt off her backside with her bundle, and slowly headed home.
try
▪ However, if cracks do appear, you should try brushing a mixture of peat or compost and coarse sand into them.
▪ Her body was unusually still and a fly had settled on her cheek, which she did not try to brush away.
▪ Kruger tried to brush the dart from his robe.
▪ When anyone tried to brush her hair, give her a bath, or change her diaper, it hurt.
▪ A good guide is to try to brush your ear with your shoulder as it throws the rig.
wash
▪ Her face was washed and her hair brushed.
▪ I washed my face and brushed my teeth.
▪ It has an open textured paste when ripe and is usually washed or brushed with brine.
▪ She washed quickly and brushed her teeth, then returned to Nathan's cabin.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Brush the dough with melted butter.
▪ As she passed, her bare arm brushed against his arm, sending a shiver down his spine.
▪ Have you brushed your teeth yet?
▪ I brushed the crumbs off the sofa.
▪ I felt something brush against the back of my head.
▪ It's time for you kids to go brush your teeth.
▪ The car brushed the bush at the end of the driveway.
▪ The car brushed the hedges on both sides of the narrow lane.
▪ Use small strokes to brush on the paint.
▪ You should brush your jacket -- it's covered in dust.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Bernard brushed his hands together then walked back to the door.
▪ Conference-goers, though, brushed aside the news as a blip on the political radar screen.
▪ Even Marshall had brushed aside all suggestions of having a few minutes to spare to give Harbury something exclusive.
▪ I brushed his back surreptitiously as I walked past.
▪ She stopped when something soft and fluttery brushed her face.
▪ The warm evening air brushed her face and tugged at her hair as the car sped south.
▪ When it was cut into ravioli, I decided, I would brush each one very lightly with egg white.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Brush

Brush \Brush\ (br[u^]sh), n. [OE. brusche, OF. broche, broce, brosse, brushwood, F. brosse brush, LL. brustia, bruscia, fr. OHG. brusta, brust, bristle, G. borste bristle, b["u]rste brush. See Bristle, n., and cf. Browse.]

  1. An instrument composed of bristles, or other like material, set in a suitable back or handle, as of wood, bone, or ivory, and used for various purposes, as in removing dust from clothes, laying on colors, etc. Brushes have different shapes and names according to their use; as, clothes brush, paint brush, tooth brush, etc.

  2. The bushy tail of a fox.

  3. (Zo["o]l.) A tuft of hair on the mandibles.

  4. Branches of trees lopped off; brushwood.

  5. A thicket of shrubs or small trees; the shrubs and small trees in a wood; underbrush.

  6. land covered with brush[5]; in Australia, a dense growth of vegetation in good soil, including shrubs and trees, mostly small.

  7. (Elec.) A bundle of flexible wires or thin plates of metal, used to conduct an electrical current to or from the commutator of a dynamo, electric motor, or similar apparatus.

  8. The act of brushing; as, to give one's clothes a brush; a rubbing or grazing with a quick motion; a light touch; as, we got a brush from the wheel as it passed.

    [As leaves] have with one winter's brush Fell from their boughts.
    --Shak.

  9. A skirmish; a slight encounter; a shock or collision; as, to have a brush with an enemy; a brush with the law.

    Let grow thy sinews till their knots be strong, And tempt not yet the brushes of the war.
    --Shak.

  10. A short contest, or trial, of speed.

    Let us enjoy a brush across the country.
    --Cornhill Mag.

    Electrical brush, a form of the electric discharge characterized by a brushlike appearance of luminous rays diverging from an electrified body.

Brush

Brush \Brush\, v. i. To move nimbly in haste; to move so lightly as scarcely to be perceived; as, to brush by.

Snatching his hat, he brushed off like the wind.
--Goldsmith.

Brush

Brush \Brush\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Brushed (br[u^]sht); p. pr. & vb. n. Brushing.] [OE. bruschen; cf. F. brosser. See Brush, n.]

  1. To apply a brush to, according to its particular use; to rub, smooth, clean, paint, etc., with a brush. ``A' brushes his hat o' mornings.''
    --Shak.

  2. To touch in passing, or to pass lightly over, as with a brush.

    Some spread their sailes, some with strong oars sweep The waters smooth, and brush the buxom wave.
    --Fairfax.

    Brushed with the kiss of rustling wings.
    --Milton.

  3. To remove or gather by brushing, or by an act like that of brushing, or by passing lightly over, as wind; -- commonly with off.

    As wicked dew as e'er my mother brushed With raven's feather from unwholesome fen.
    --Shak.

    And from the boughts brush off the evil dew.
    --Milton.

    To brush aside, to remove from one's way, as with a brush.

    To brush away, to remove, as with a brush or brushing motion.

    To brush up, to paint, or make clean or bright with a brush; to cleanse or improve; to renew.

    You have commissioned me to paint your shop, and I have done my best to brush you up like your neighbors.
    --Pope.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
brush

late 15c., "to clean or rub (clothing) with a brush," also (mid-15c.) "to beat with a brush," from brush (n.1). Related: Brushed; brushing. To brush off someone or something, "rebuff, dismiss," is from 1941.

brush

"dust-sweeper, a brush for sweeping," late 14c., also, c.1400, "brushwood, brushes;" from Old French broisse (Modern French brosse) "a brush" (13c.), perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bruscia "a bunch of new shoots" (used to sweep away dust), perhaps from Proto-Germanic *bruskaz "underbrush."

brush

"shrubbery," early 14c., from Anglo-French bruce "brushwood," Old North French broche, Old French broce "bush, thicket, undergrowth" (12c., Modern French brosse), from Gallo-Roman *brocia, perhaps from *brucus "heather," or possibly from the same source as brush (n.1).

brush

"move briskly" especially past or against something or someone, 1670s, from earlier sense (c.1400) "to hasten, rush," probably from brush (n.2), on the notion of a horse, etc., passing through dense undergrowth (compare Old French brosser "travel (through woods)," and Middle English noun brush "charge, onslaught, encounter," mid-14c.), but brush (n.1) probably has contributed something to it as well. Related: Brushed; brushing.\n

Wiktionary
brush

n. 1 An implement consisting of multiple more or less flexible bristles or other filament attached to a handle, used for any of various purposes including cleaning, painting, and arranging hair. 2 A piece of conductive material, usually carbon, serving to maintain electrical contact between the stationary and rotating parts of a machine. 3 The act of brushing something. 4 (lb en uncountable) Wild vegetation, generally larger than grass but smaller than trees (http://en.wikipedi

  1. org/wiki/Shrubland). v

  2. 1 To clean with a brush. 2 To untangle or arrange with a brush. 3 To apply with a brush. 4 To remove with a sweeping motion. 5 To touch with a sweeping motion, or lightly in passing.

WordNet
brush
  1. v. rub with a brush, or as if with a brush; "Johnson brushed the hairs from his jacket"

  2. touch lightly and briefly; "He brushed the wall lightly"

  3. clean with a brush; "She brushed the suit before hanging it back into the closet"

  4. sweep across or over; "Her long skirt brushed the floor"; "A gasp swept cross the audience" [syn: sweep]

  5. remove with or as if with a brush; "brush away the crumbs"; "brush the dust from the jacket"; "brush aside the objections"

  6. cover by brushing; "brush the bread with melted butter"

brush
  1. n. a dense growth of bushes [syn: brushwood, coppice, copse, thicket]

  2. an implement that has hairs or bristles firmly set into a handle

  3. momentary contact [syn: light touch]

  4. conducts current between rotating and stationary parts of a generator or motor

  5. a minor short-term fight [syn: clash, encounter, skirmish]

  6. the act of brushing your teeth; "the dentist recommended two brushes a day" [syn: brushing]

  7. the act of brushing your hair; "he gave his hair a quick brush" [syn: brushing]

  8. contact with something dangerous or undesirable; "I had a brush with danger on my way to work"; "he tried to avoid any brushes with the police"

Gazetteer
Brush, CO -- U.S. city in Colorado
Population (2000): 5117
Housing Units (2000): 1923
Land area (2000): 2.413702 sq. miles (6.251460 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 2.413702 sq. miles (6.251460 sq. km)
FIPS code: 09555
Located within: Colorado (CO), FIPS 08
Location: 40.257836 N, 103.628109 W
ZIP Codes (1990): 80723
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Brush, CO
Brush
Wikipedia
Brush

A brush is a tool with bristles, wire or other filaments, used for cleaning, grooming hair, make up, painting, surface finishing and for many other purposes. It is one of the most basic and versatile tools known to mankind, and the average household may contain several dozen varieties. It generally consists of a handle or block to which filaments are affixed either parallel- or perpendicular-wise, depending on the way the brush is to be gripped during use. The material of both the block and bristles or filaments is chosen to withstand hazards of its application, such as corrosive chemicals, heat or abrasion.

Brush (disambiguation)

__NOTOC__ A brush is a device with bristles, wire or other filaments used for cleaning, grooming, painting ( paintbrush), etc. Brush may also refer to:

Brush (electric)

A brush is a device which conducts current between stationary wires and moving parts, most commonly in a rotating shaft. Typical applications include electric motors, alternators and electric generators.

Brush (video game)

Brushes are templates, used in some 3D video games such as games based on the Quake engine, the Source game engine, or Unreal Engine, to construct levels. Brushes can be primitive shapes (such as cubes, spheres & cones), pre-defined shapes (such as staircases), or custom shapes (such as prisms and other polyhedra).

During the map compilation process, brushes are turned into meshes that can be rendered by the game engine. Often brushes are restricted to convex shapes only, as this reduces the complexity of the binary space partitioning process. However, using CSG operations, complex rooms and objects can be created by adding, subtracting and intersecting brushes to and from one another. Additionally, brushes can used as liquids or as an area trigger.

Brush (surname)

Brush is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Charles F. Brush (1849–1929), United States inventor
  • George de Forest Brush (1855–1941), United States painter
  • George Jarvis Brush (1831–1912), United States mineralogist
  • Henry Brush (1778–1855), United States legislator
  • Jared M. Brush (1814–1895), former mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Joey Brush (1955-2015), American politician
  • John T. Brush (1845–1912), United States sports executive
  • Katharine Brush (1902–1952), United States author
  • Paul Brush (born 1958), English footballer
  • Richard Brush (born 1984), English footballer

Usage examples of "brush".

The boy stood beside the curule chair and looked down at the crowd, this his first experience of the extraordinary euphoria so many united people could generate, feeling the adulation brush his cheek because he stood so close to its source, and understanding what it must be like to be the First Man in Rome.

Through the gnarled limbs Aganippe saw two great rounded folds of earth, with a dark cleft between them, topped by a tuft of trees and brush.

Mark leading the way, they rounded still another corner, brushing past nurses and candy stripers, meditative interns and the aimlessly ambling, dull-eyed relatives of the ailing.

The crowd surged forward to the corral again and several strangers clapped Alec on the back, envying him his brush with royalty.

Then there was a small library of other books, including a medical lexicon published in London and an almanac beginning at the year 1731, the Holy Bible, ink, pens and writing paper, a box of watercolours and brushes, reams of fine-quality drawing paper, knitting needles and wool, a roll of soft tanned leather from which to make the uppers for footwear- the soles would be cut from buffalo rawhide.

He opened and cleaned the wounds with something that felt like a wire brush, stitched them up neatly, covered them all with aluminium foil and bandage, fed me a variety of pills then, for good measure, jabbed me a couple of times with a hypodermic syringe.

Cloud snorted and the other horses acted bothered, but the ambient was otherwise quiet, and Cloud settled to being brushed again, rocking gently to the strong strokes Danny put into it.

Shy, iridescent, coltish, pelvically anfractuous, amply busted, given to diffident movements of hand brushing flaxen hair from front of dear creamy forehead, movements which drove Bruce Green up a private tree.

His steps slowed overhead and she found herself listening out for him anxiously as she hurried to her own bedroom, showered and scrambled into a simple scoop-neck T-shirt and denim button-through skirt, dragging aquick brush through her hair.

Passing over the nightstand, his fingers touch a box of aspirin, brush the preserved Epigaea repens, and curl around the neck of the half-full Arbutus bottle.

He pulled the fabric lower, revealing the edges of her areolae, brushing his tongue across them.

 The robber that accosted Brother Francis was not in any obvious way one of the malformed, but that he came from the Valley of the Misborn was made evident when two hooded figures arose from behind a tangle of brush on the slope that overlooked the trail and hooted mockingly at the monk from ambush, while aiming at him with drawn bows.

Tony brushed it off against his jeans as Arra laid a strainer over the top of the jar and decanted the hot, greenish-brown vodka into it.

The sardonic cleric seated beside Rosvita, who kept making sarcastic asides, brushed at his shoulder when Liath tugged at his robes, as though brushing at a fly.

With a slow movement, he raised three times the asperges brush, and he purified him with a gentle rain.