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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
broadcasting
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
independent television/radio/broadcasting etcBritish English (= not owned or paid for by the government)
▪ independent television companies
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
new
▪ By 1981 some parties were planning to launch new papers or broadcasting stations.
▪ Radio Rentals take a pride in keeping up to date with new broadcasting technology.
▪ The refinements also had to cover the new forms of broadcasting.
▪ There is a new sound broadcasting system under study, for introduction early in the next century.
▪ Also at fault is the new broadcasting law, which rules out many potential buyers.
▪ The company had to bid for its new broadcasting licence at auction and won it with a bid of £2,000.
public
▪ Also in 1920, the first public broadcasting station in Britain was opened by Marconi.
▪ Section 2 deals with the concept of public service broadcasting.
▪ Still less can they accept impartial public broadcasting combined with a biased press and biased satellite television.
▪ There are moves to reintroduce public service broadcasting which lost all credibility under Pinochet's dictatorship.
▪ Principle, as well as expediency, therefore ensured that public service broadcasting was to be impartial.
▪ The government even proved willing to take certain industries into public ownership: broadcasting, overseas airways, and the electricity-generating industry.
▪ Much time and energy in the early 1970S was spent on distinctions between state and public service broadcasting.
▪ I've always been a strong advocate of public service broadcasting, such an important element in this influential means of communication.
religious
▪ The region has continued to develop projects to assist professionals working in religious broadcasting.
▪ Air Your Faith gives the background to religious broadcasting in Britain and outlines the current situation.
▪ During the workshop, participants shared reports on the status of religious broadcasting in their respective countries.
■ NOUN
authority
▪ The directive was simply another obstacle which had to be taken into account by the broadcasting authorities.
radio
Radio producers have to remind themselves each week that radio broadcasting isn't about selling records, but about entertaining an audience.
▪ For the most part, only lip-service has been paid to the importance of radio broadcasting.
▪ Although radio broadcasting killed the Electrophone Company and piped entertainment in London, telephone transmissions continued in Bournemouth until 1937.
▪ It stretched from the infancy of radio broadcasting in the early twenties right through to television and the present day.
▪ There were no doubts or misgivings about the move from my chosen field of journalism to the wider horizons of radio broadcasting.
▪ When regular radio broadcasting began in 1922, the press refused at first to publish free the daily programme schedules.
service
▪ Section 2 deals with the concept of public service broadcasting.
▪ There are moves to reintroduce public service broadcasting which lost all credibility under Pinochet's dictatorship.
▪ Principle, as well as expediency, therefore ensured that public service broadcasting was to be impartial.
▪ Much time and energy in the early 1970S was spent on distinctions between state and public service broadcasting.
▪ I've always been a strong advocate of public service broadcasting, such an important element in this influential means of communication.
▪ But within this regulatory system, one also finds the basis of the idea of public service broadcasting.
▪ Public service broadcasting probably can not survive in the market-place and it therefore needs financial, political, and cultural support.
state
▪ Therein probably lies the potency of the Gaullist concept of state broadcasting.
▪ The Tzannetakis administration left state broadcasting free to report objectively.
▪ De Gaulle's notes to Peyrefitte, mentioned above, indicate dissatisfaction with the implementation of the state broadcasting policy.
station
▪ Also in 1920, the first public broadcasting station in Britain was opened by Marconi.
▪ The leader of the earlier occupation of the broadcasting station was identified as Maj. Narcisse Djoua.
▪ We saluted the Press, mentioning the government forces that insisted on closing down our city's own broadcasting station.
▪ A cordon of armour was parked around newspapers and broadcasting stations, and key members of the previous administration were arrested.
▪ Should the broadcasting station be placed under a government department under a politically appointed boss?
▪ By 1981 some parties were planning to launch new papers or broadcasting stations.
▪ The conference agreed to set up a base in Kurdistan, including a broadcasting station.
▪ The Communist Party and various affiliates control nearly all Soviet printing presses and broadcasting stations.
system
▪ MPEG-2 sets the standard for the compression of digital signals, the most complicated and expensive element of any digital broadcasting system.
▪ Emphasis will be given to media training schemes and also to considering the establishment of a public broadcasting system.
▪ There is a new sound broadcasting system under study, for introduction early in the next century.
television
▪ For many pro-reform Soviet citizens, Nevzorov personified the hardline editorial shift in television broadcasting.
▪ The Interfax news agency reported demonstrations in St Petersburg on June 22 over access to television broadcasting.
■ VERB
begin
▪ Sunshine 855 began broadcasting from a farmer's barn in the late seventies.
▪ Radio 303 began broadcasting in Skopje in February 1990.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
terrestrial TV/broadcasting/channels etc
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Current broadcasting rules would ban the choice prize a takeover of Granada, the suitor Tyne Tees spurned last year.
▪ Gaullist control of broadcasting did not lessen.
▪ Much time and energy in the early 1970S was spent on distinctions between state and public service broadcasting.
▪ Principle, as well as expediency, therefore ensured that public service broadcasting was to be impartial.
▪ Section 2 deals with the concept of public service broadcasting.
▪ The extent to which educational skills are needed in broadcasting can none the less be exaggerated.
▪ The only clear case where this strategy succeeded was when Thatcher introduced the SinnFéin broadcasting ban.
▪ We began by asking her how she came to be in broadcasting.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
broadcasting

broadcasting \broad"cast`ing\ n. the medium that disseminates via telecommunications; radio and television.

Syn: broadcast media.

2. taking part in a radio or tv program.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
broadcasting

1922, verbal noun from broadcast (v.).

Wiktionary
broadcasting
  1. Sending in all directions. n. 1 (context business English) The business or profession of radio and television. 2 The act by which something is broadcast. v

  2. (present participle of broadcast English)

WordNet
broadcasting
  1. n. a medium that disseminates via telecommunications [syn: broadcast medium]

  2. taking part in a radio or tv program

Wikipedia
Broadcasting

Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video content to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to-many model. Broadcasting began with AM radio broadcasting which came into popular use starting with the invention of the crystal detector in 1906. Before this, all forms of electronic communication, radio, telephone, and telegraph, were "one-to-one", with the message intended for a single recipient. The term "broadcasting", borrowed from the agricultural method of sowing seeds in a field by casting them broadly about, was coined by either KDKA manager Frank Conrad or RCA historian George Clark around 1920 to distinguish this new activity of "one-to-many" communication; a single radio station transmitting to multiple listeners.

Over the air broadcasting is usually associated with radio and television, though in practice radio and television transmissions take place using both wires and radio waves. The receiving parties may include the general public or a relatively small subset; the point is that anyone with the appropriate receiving technology can receive the signal. The field of broadcasting includes a wide range of practices, from relatively private exchanges such as public radio, community radio and commercial radio, public television, and commercial television.

U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, title 47, part 97 defines "broadcasting" as "transmissions intended for reception by the general public, either direct or relayed". Private or two-way telecommunications transmissions do not qualify under this definition. For example, amateur ("ham") and citizens band (CB) radio operators are not allowed to broadcast. As defined, "transmitting" and "broadcasting" are not the same.

Transmission of radio and television programs from a radio or television station to home receivers over the spectrum is referred to as OTA (over the air) or terrestrial broadcasting and in most countries requires a broadcasting license. Transmissions using a combination of satellite and wired transmission, like cable television (which also retransmits OTA stations with their consent), are also considered broadcasts, and do not require a license. Transmissions of television and radio via streaming digital technology have increasingly been referred to as broadcasting as well, though strictly speaking this is incorrect.

Broadcasting (networking)

In telecommunication and information theory, broadcasting is a method of transferring a message to all recipients simultaneously. Broadcasting can be performed as a high level operation in a program, for example broadcasting Message Passing Interface, or it may be a low level networking operation, for example broadcasting on Ethernet.

All-to-all communication is a computer communication method in which each sender transmits messages to all receivers within a group. This contrasts with the point-to-point method in which each sender communicates with one receiver.

Usage examples of "broadcasting".

BCN has just learned that the Secret Service has taken into custody one Dennis Nealon, technical director for the Multinational Broadcasting Corporation, in connection with the Captain Audion terror transmission.

They would use the kids as hostages and boogie to the border in that big flashy Jaguar with the helicopters broadcasting every moment of the trip on live TV.

The institute was a thoroughly modern and up-to-date facility, in keeping with the modern and up-to-date subjects taught within its walls: electricity and electronics, mechanics, plumbing, recycling and reclamation, construction, carpentry, accounting and bookkeeping, secretarial skills, data recording, computer programming and repair, cybernation maintenance, aeronautics, solar-cell construction, electrical generating, motion-picture projection, camera operation, audio recording, hydrogen-fusion operation, power broadcasting, electrical space propulsion, satellite construction and repair, telemetry, and many more.

Goebbels, who was staging the performance and directing the broadcasting of it to the nation, observed - and noted in his diary - that the old Field Marshal had tears in his eyes.

An aircraft construction man named Bowyer who was broadcasting together with him agreed with this.

I can get plenty of journalistic and broadcasting work, it is rather a hand-to-mouth existence.

The best known of these is the New British Broadcasting Station, which earlier in the war the Blackshirts used to advertise by means of stickybacks.

Letter to Rayner Heppenstall The British Broadcasting Corporation Broadcasting House, London, W1 24 August 1943 Dear Rayner,          Thanks for yours.

I believe that in the present political situation the broadcasting of British propaganda to India is an almost hopeless task.

Poetry and the Microphone          About a year ago I and a number of others were engaged in broadcasting literary programmes to India, and among other things we broadcast a good deal of verse by contemporary and near-contemporary English writers -- for example, Eliot, Herbert Read, Auden, Spender, Dylan Thomas, Henry Treece, Alex Comfort, Robert Bridges, Edmund Blunden, D.

I should add that the fact that we were broadcasting to an Indian audience dictated our technique to some extent.

I was early struck by the fact that the broadcasting of a poem by the person who wrote it does not merely produce an effect upon the audience, if any, but also on the poet himself.

One must remember that extremely little in the way of broadcasting poetry has been done in England, and that many people who write verse have never even considered the idea of reading it aloud.

In broadcasting your audience is conjectural, but it is an audience of one.

The poet feels that he is addressing people to whom poetry means something, and it is a fact that poets who are used to broadcasting can read into the microphone with a virtuosity they would not equal if they had a visible audience in front of them.