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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
biosphere
noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ As he examined the biosphere in succeeding years, he added more complex phenomena to the list of life-made.
▪ CO2 is the accepted limiting resource for the biosphere.
▪ He enraged biologists by considering the biosphere of living creatures as a large chemical factory.
▪ Once formed, rings soon cease to exchange with the biosphere.
▪ The elements it cradles are in a dynamic equilibrium with the cycling composition of the atmosphere and water and biosphere.
▪ The glass spaceship parked in the desert is called a biosphere because the logic of the Bios runs through it.
▪ We all depend on one biosphere for sustaining our lives.
▪ When creating a biosphere remember that: Microorganisms do most of the work.
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
biosphere

1899, on model of German Biosphäre (1875), coined by German geologist Eduard Suess (1831-1914); see bio- + sphere.

Wiktionary
biosphere

n. 1 the part of the Earth and its atmosphere capable of supporting life 2 the totality of living organisms and their environment

WordNet
biosphere

n. the regions of the surface and atmosphere of the Earth (or other planet) where living organisms exist

Wikipedia
Biosphere

The biosphere is the global sum of all ecosystems. It can also be termed as the zone of life on Earth, a closed system (apart from solar and cosmic radiation and heat from the interior of the Earth), and largely self-regulating. By the most general biophysiological definition, the biosphere is the global ecological system integrating all living beings and their relationships, including their interaction with the elements of the lithosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The biosphere is postulated to have evolved, beginning with a process of biopoesis (life created naturally from non-living matter, such as simple organic compounds) or biogenesis (life created from living matter), at least some 3.5 billion years ago. The earliest evidence for life on Earth includes biogenic graphite found in 3.7 billion-year-old metasedimentary rocks from Western Greenland and microbial mat fossils found in 3.48 billion-year-old sandstone from Western Australia. More recently, in 2015, "remains of biotic life" were found in 4.1 billion-year-old rocks in Western Australia. According to one of the researchers, "If life arose relatively quickly on Earth ... then it could be common in the universe."

In a general sense, biospheres are any closed, self-regulating systems containing ecosystems. This includes artificial biospheres such as Biosphere 2 and BIOS-3, and potentially ones on other planets or moons.

Biosphere (musician)

Biosphere is the main recording name of Geir Jenssen (born 30 May 1962), a Norwegian musician who has released a notable catalogue of ambient electronic music. He is well known for his works on ambient techno and arctic themed pieces, his use of music loops, and peculiar samples from sci-fi sources. His 1997 album Substrata was voted by the users of the Hyperreal website in 2001 as the best all-time classic ambient album.

Biosphere (disambiguation)

A biosphere is the part of a planet's shell where all life occurs; a self-regulating, closed ecological system.

Biosphere may also refer to:

  • Biosphere (musician) (born 1962), recording name of Geir Jenssen, a Norwegian musician
  • "Biosphere", a song by In Flames on their Subterranean
  • Biosphere (album), an album by Loudness
  • Biosphere 2, an artificial closed ecological system in Oracle, Arizona
  • Biosphere reserve, initiated by UNESCO
  • Montreal Biosphère, a geodesic dome in Montreal, Canada
  • BIOS-3, the first man made biosphere for sustaining humans in a closed ecology
  • The Biosphere, a book by Russian and Soviet geologist Vladimir Vernadsky
  • Sector 1/Biosphere, an area explored in the video game Metroid: Other M
Biosphere (album)

Biosphere ~Shinsekai~ is the 17th studio album by the Japanese metal band Loudness. It was released only in Japan, in 2002.

Usage examples of "biosphere".

Ego camps still absolutize the noosphere, the Eco camps are still absolutizing the biosphere, utterly unaware that this contributes every bit as much as the Ego camps to the destruction of the biosphere itself.

Ego and the Eco will never be integrated in this scheme, with the one absolutizing the noosphere and the other absolutizing the biosphere.

The alien biospheres that had produced that precious blend of breathable gases were inevitably hostile and poisonous to terrestrial organisms, some immediately fatal.

But where the differentiation of the biosphere and the noosphere was not complete, the biospheric identities sucked these movements back out of the noosphere and into the bodily or biological determinants.

The biosphere remains essentially intact on Wessex as it does on the other New48.

Divine Plan, exoskeletal forms always become dominant within any biosphere, a complex association evolving between the patterns associated with the fundamental groups of arthropods, crustaceans, and mollusks.

On other planets the biospheres had not been totally destroyed, but rather purged of all life much larger than a bacterium or a worm.

The Tsuris computer, which was able to extend its power far beyond its biosphere, like a globular creature extending a long ghostly but effective pseudopod, extended its influence and plucked the Scalsian ship out of space and dragged it down to the level of the planet.

Or it could also be said that the extreme amplification of human race, which has occurred only in the past hundred years or so, has suddenly produced a very large quantity of meat, which is sitting everywhere in the biosphere and may not be able to defend itself against a life form that might want to consume it.

And thus it is small wonder that, in these ecologically disastrous times, many moderns are attempting to resurrect the natural wisdom of tribal awareness more attuned with the biosphere.

At the end of the period of greenhouse heating, there was an overshoot of the return to normal, as the whole biosphere and its ruined biosystems strove for adjustment.

Treatment of the land is fundamental to any government concerned with permaculture, that is, with stewardship of the biosphere for        the good of future generations.

The resulting caverns were expanded, regularized into cylindrical shapes, the surface sculpted into a landscape, sealed, then turned into habitable biospheres.

Inside each herd-ship, hundreds of biospheres were painstakingly repro duced down to the microscopic flora and fauna of the topsoils.

Fifty-six thousand people had been killed when the biosphere chamber ruptured, spewing them out into space.