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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
being
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
accuse sb of being a liar
▪ He accused me of being a liar.
alien beings
alien beings from another planet
describe sb/sth as (being/having) sth
▪ After the operation her condition was described as comfortable.
▪ The youth is described as being 18 to 19 years old.
intelligent beings
▪ Are there intelligent beings on other planets?
only being polite
▪ I know Ian said he liked her singing, but he was only being polite.
risk being seen/caught/arrested etc
▪ Workers who broke the strike risked being attacked when they left the factory.
Supreme Being
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I'm not being funny (but)
all (other) things being equal
▪ All other things being equal, schools where parents are highly involved are more likely to run effectively.
▪ Both snail genes and fluke genes stand to gain from the snail's bodily survival, all other things being equal.
▪ But all other things being equal, the gay and lesbian community has responded well to examples of perceived corporate goodwill.
▪ But all things being equal, most movie makers would like their facts to be right.
▪ It shows the quantities of a product which will be demanded at various prices, all other things being equal.
▪ Significant improvements in clarity and stereo imaging are amongst the more obvious benefits of such parity, all other things being equal.
▪ The bright chestnut is considered the most characteristic colour and, all other things being equal, the one to be preferred.
all (other) things being equal
▪ Both snail genes and fluke genes stand to gain from the snail's bodily survival, all other things being equal.
▪ But all things being equal, most movie makers would like their facts to be right.
▪ But all other things being equal, the gay and lesbian community has responded well to examples of perceived corporate goodwill.
▪ It shows the quantities of a product which will be demanded at various prices, all other things being equal.
▪ Significant improvements in clarity and stereo imaging are amongst the more obvious benefits of such parity, all other things being equal.
▪ The bright chestnut is considered the most characteristic colour and, all other things being equal, the one to be preferred.
being drunk and disorderly
▪ Mr. Bell denied being drunk and disorderly and denied being in breach of the bail condition.
▪ Once, in about 1985 I think, for being drunk and disorderly.
▪ Reportedly, two Houston police officers arrested a black woman for being drunk and disorderly.
for the time being
▪ Although the government aims to encourage private enterprise, around one third of the economy will remain under state control, for the time being.
▪ Bob's keeping his car in our garage for the time being.
▪ For the time being, Mrs Gilman's classes will be taken by other teachers.
▪ But for the time being, at least, stick an asterisk next to this season.
▪ But for the time being, one has to be realistic.
▪ Certainly, it rules out an easing for the time being.
▪ The villagers' resistance has led to the plan being postponed for the time being.
▪ This will, hopefully, shift his focus from writing to acting, at least for the time being.
▪ Tom is retired for the time being.
▪ We both know that the burden for the time being is going to be on him and his paintings.
▪ When it asks which formats it should play, let it take over everything for the time being.
with every fibre of your being
▪ And in that moment she wished with every fibre of her being that it really was possible for her to stay away.
▪ What she was sure of, though, was that she wanted him with every fibre of her being.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Being young and single, I wasn't really worried about what might happen.
▪ I wasn't surprised about the accident, kids being what they are.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
alien
▪ The daleks in question are not enraged alien beings with full metal jackets.
▪ There was no alien spacecraft, and there were no alien beings and no secret autopsies in the desert in 1947.
▪ One to concentrate on his thoughts, the other to concentrate on the flight ahead that was alien to his being.
▪ That was exactly how I felt, as if I had been brought up by alien beings, inhuman things.
▪ In short, he concluded without reservation that the canals were artificial constructs of technologically advanced alien beings.
conscious
▪ Science can try to understand what computational change turned a chimpanzee into a conscious human being.
▪ For nothing can be called intrinsically valuable unless it is actually valued by some conscious being.
▪ One major distinguishing feature between all conscious beings is the eyes.
fellow
▪ To: Lord Younger Please hear my plead From a fellow human being with just one need.
▪ Artists, together with their fellow beings, picked their way through ruined cities, wearing what clothes they could get.
▪ Surely some one would look at me back - recognize me as some kind of fellow human being?
▪ The satisfaction of helping fellow human beings in need.
▪ Their failure was that, because of man's inhumanity to his fellow beings, they did not fulfil their potential.
▪ I would be more than happy to greet the Duchess with the manners and respect that any fellow human being deserves.
▪ It never does to judge one's fellow human beings, does it?
▪ He gave the impression of being perpetually amused by, and yet far above, the foibles of fellow human beings.
human
▪ Sharing in such a personal faith gives unity to the diversity of human beings, bringing us together with others.
▪ A human being can undergo only so many changes and take in only so many experiences.
▪ It is clear that the destination of post-mortem existence was a world other than and different from the world human beings inhabit.
▪ But Night Trap could not be exempted because it depicted violent actions involving realistic images of human beings rather than straight forward computer graphics.
▪ Certainly we now know that suffering and death existed among animals long before the appearance of the first human beings.
▪ The funny man who had found her on a distant planet and had treated her as a human being.
▪ The human being, in other words, may be the victim of generations of male choice even more than female choice.
intelligent
▪ Is this consistent with respect for intelligent human beings?
▪ He is a decent, intelligent human being who happens to see the world through a very narrow prism.
▪ We are hiding from the attack presented by the plain statements of a normal and intelligent human being.
▪ He took me to the farmer, who soon realized that I was not an animal, but an intelligent being.
▪ Maybe some other race of intelligent beings elsewhere in the galaxy will achieve a better balance between responsibility and aggression.
▪ Some scientists believe that these marine mammals may be more intelligent than human beings.
▪ For we are clearly concerned with intelligent human beings.
living
▪ Why should spirits aid living beings?
▪ Odonata have never attacked a living human being.
▪ It had all the required characteristics of a living being and Lovelock concluded that this indeed was what it was.
▪ A living being is therefore in essence a potentially self-healing system.
▪ Filaments linked living beings with the seeds of themselves in the deep-down ooze.
▪ Its excesses had already degenerated into the sacrifice of living beings and its Chaotic nature was increasingly evident.
▪ He does not take into consideration the fact that they are killing, or trying to kill an living being.
▪ They were trying to earn a decent living as human beings.
other
▪ It displays a basic lack of respect for other human beings.
▪ Secondly, central bankers, like other human beings, can take the wrong decisions.
▪ They can even distinguish the scent of other human beings by sniffing the ground where they may have walked.
▪ So children take precedence over animals and other human beings generally do also.
▪ Just three years later I was taller than any other human being at our school, teachers included.
▪ Form close relationships with other human beings.
rational
▪ In turn, this presupposes treating the other as a person, as, at least partly, a rational being.
▪ It is the specification of those basic intrinsic values that all rational beings would desire.
▪ The implication, they fear, is that when the chips are down it is only rational human beings that really matter.
▪ So indeterminism is a necessary condition of the later development of morally important freedom in rational beings.
▪ I am not convinced that the principle of natural selection alone makes the emergence of rational beings probable.
social
▪ Socialisation is essential for a person to develop into a social being.
▪ Perceptions shaped her; proving her only human, a social being.
▪ Fourthly, ideology legitimizes social relations and covers over contradictions in the material relations of social being.
▪ Individuals, through love, become real social beings, each identifying with and loving through the other.
▪ Style may crystallize into persona and persona be understood as a public presentation of a particular type of social being.
▪ In the country you lived as a social being and at the valuation of others.
▪ For scientists are social beings, their ideas moulded partly by social experience.
▪ Every child presents this process of transformation to us; only by that means does it become a moral and social being.
supreme
▪ I presume that we mean a supreme personal being - distinct from the world and creator of the world.
▪ Belief in supreme beings of whatever creed or breed seemed to Kate to constitute an evasion of personal responsibility.
▪ Fundamentalism is a belief system that can not be refuted because it comes from a supreme being.
whole
▪ She shivered through her whole being.
▪ Real compassion involves our whole being.
▪ His whole being had been consumed by a passionate longing to return.
▪ Two whole beings, joined together.
▪ In fact my whole being was permeated by the leaden-armed pervading weakness one feels when forced to work in the small hours.
▪ The thought was terrifying to one whose whole being was devoted to the outer show.
▪ The self is how people see themselves as whole beings.
▪ There is joy in living in this very moment with the whole being.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
I'm not being funny (but)
all (other) things being equal
▪ All other things being equal, schools where parents are highly involved are more likely to run effectively.
▪ Both snail genes and fluke genes stand to gain from the snail's bodily survival, all other things being equal.
▪ But all other things being equal, the gay and lesbian community has responded well to examples of perceived corporate goodwill.
▪ But all things being equal, most movie makers would like their facts to be right.
▪ It shows the quantities of a product which will be demanded at various prices, all other things being equal.
▪ Significant improvements in clarity and stereo imaging are amongst the more obvious benefits of such parity, all other things being equal.
▪ The bright chestnut is considered the most characteristic colour and, all other things being equal, the one to be preferred.
all (other) things being equal
▪ Both snail genes and fluke genes stand to gain from the snail's bodily survival, all other things being equal.
▪ But all things being equal, most movie makers would like their facts to be right.
▪ But all other things being equal, the gay and lesbian community has responded well to examples of perceived corporate goodwill.
▪ It shows the quantities of a product which will be demanded at various prices, all other things being equal.
▪ Significant improvements in clarity and stereo imaging are amongst the more obvious benefits of such parity, all other things being equal.
▪ The bright chestnut is considered the most characteristic colour and, all other things being equal, the one to be preferred.
being drunk and disorderly
▪ Mr. Bell denied being drunk and disorderly and denied being in breach of the bail condition.
▪ Once, in about 1985 I think, for being drunk and disorderly.
▪ Reportedly, two Houston police officers arrested a black woman for being drunk and disorderly.
for the time being
▪ Although the government aims to encourage private enterprise, around one third of the economy will remain under state control, for the time being.
▪ Bob's keeping his car in our garage for the time being.
▪ For the time being, Mrs Gilman's classes will be taken by other teachers.
▪ But for the time being, at least, stick an asterisk next to this season.
▪ But for the time being, one has to be realistic.
▪ Certainly, it rules out an easing for the time being.
▪ The villagers' resistance has led to the plan being postponed for the time being.
▪ This will, hopefully, shift his focus from writing to acting, at least for the time being.
▪ Tom is retired for the time being.
▪ We both know that the burden for the time being is going to be on him and his paintings.
▪ When it asks which formats it should play, let it take over everything for the time being.
spring into existence/being
▪ Finally new businesses do not spring into existence simply because taxes are reduced in a given area.
▪ Here, a fast, sparkling fresh stream springs into existence, fords a lane and runs parallel to a wooden pathway.
▪ It may be possible to think of a universe springing into existence out of nothing at all.
▪ Louis, have sprung into being.
▪ The nurse's soft, slightly damp touch faded and darkness sprang into being inside Chesarynth's head.
strike sb as (being) sth
▪ His arguments struck us as completely ridiculous.
▪ Mr. West struck me as a very good businessman.
▪ Alan and I used to fight - but that was just little boys striking out.
▪ It all struck Tish as an exciting ride.
▪ It did strike me as somewhat odd that Ellen would wait so long in life to discover her true orientation.
▪ Jocasta struck him as a typical Hollywood brat, neglected, indulged, selfish and forced to grow up too fast.
▪ She struck me as being a horror in the play.
▪ Surely these folks were great pals but that strikes me as a strange way to show it.
▪ They hoped that the very talk of a general strike would act as a restraining influence on militarism.
▪ Thus the strike came as no surprise to those involved.
with every fibre of your being
▪ And in that moment she wished with every fibre of her being that it really was possible for her to stay away.
▪ What she was sure of, though, was that she wanted him with every fibre of her being.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a human being
▪ living beings
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And that electrical energy also affects human beings.
▪ First of all, the bureaucrats shop like robots, not like human beings.
▪ It's so peculiar to think that you plus wife equals a new human being.
▪ Nature is said to abhor a vacuum; human beings abhor complexity. 3.
▪ The physiological states of growing organisms including human beings - vary greatly from one stage to another.
▪ These are status-hungry beings eager to define a place in the world for themselves and for others.
▪ We live by these great beings in the sky.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Being

Be \Be\ (b[=e]), v. i. [imp. Was (w[o^]z); p. p. Been (b[i^]n); p. pr. & vb. n. Being.] [OE. been, beon, AS. be['o]n to be, be['o]m I am; akin to OHG. bim, pim, G. bin, I am, Gael. & Ir. bu was, W. bod to be, Lith. bu-ti, O. Slav. by-ti, to be, L. fu-i I have been, fu-turus about to be, fo-re to be about to be, and perh. to fieri to become, Gr. fy^nai to be born, to be, Skr. bh[=u] to be. This verb is defective, and the parts lacking are supplied by verbs from other roots, is, was, which have no radical connection with be. The various forms, am, are, is, was, were, etc., are considered grammatically as parts of the verb ``to be'', which, with its conjugational forms, is often called the substantive verb. [root]97. Cf. Future, Physic.]

  1. To exist actually, or in the world of fact; to have existence.

    To be contents his natural desire.
    --Pope.

    To be, or not to be: that is the question.
    --Shak.

  2. To exist in a certain manner or relation, -- whether as a reality or as a product of thought; to exist as the subject of a certain predicate, that is, as having a certain attribute, or as belonging to a certain sort, or as identical with what is specified, -- a word or words for the predicate being annexed; as, to be happy; to be here; to be large, or strong; to be an animal; to be a hero; to be a nonentity; three and two are five; annihilation is the cessation of existence; that is the man.

  3. To take place; to happen; as, the meeting was on Thursday.

  4. To signify; to represent or symbolize; to answer to.

    The field is the world.
    --Matt. xiii. 38.

    The seven candlesticks which thou sawest are the seven churches.
    --Rev. i. 20.

    Note: The verb to be (including the forms is, was, etc.) is used in forming the passive voice of other verbs; as, John has been struck by James. It is also used with the past participle of many intransitive verbs to express a state of the subject. But have is now more commonly used as the auxiliary, though expressing a different sense; as, ``Ye have come too late -- but ye are come. '' ``The minstrel boy to the war is gone.'' The present and imperfect tenses form, with the infinitive, a particular future tense, which expresses necessity, duty, or purpose; as, government is to be supported; we are to pay our just debts; the deed is to be signed to-morrow.

    Note: Have or had been, followed by to, implies movement. ``I have been to Paris.''
    --Sydney Smith. ``Have you been to Franchard ?''
    --R. L. Stevenson.

    Note: Been, or ben, was anciently the the indicative present. ``Ye ben light of the world.''
    --Wyclif, Matt. v. 14. Afterwards be was used, as in our Bible: ``They that be with us are more than they that be with them.''
    --2 Kings vi. 16. Ben was also the old infinitive: ``To ben of such power.''
    --R. of Gloucester. Be is used as a form of the present subjunctive: ``But if it be a question of words and names.''
    --Acts xviii. 1

  5. But the indicative forms, is and are, with if, are more commonly used.

    Be it so, a phrase of supposition, equivalent to suppose it to be so; or of permission, signifying let it be so.
    --Shak.

    If so be, in case.

    To be from, to have come from; as, from what place are you? I am from Chicago.

    To let be, to omit, or leave untouched; to let alone. ``Let be, therefore, my vengeance to dissuade.''
    --Spenser.

    Syn: To be, Exist.

    Usage: The verb to be, except in a few rare cases, like that of Shakespeare's ``To be, or not to be'', is used simply as a copula, to connect a subject with its predicate; as, man is mortal; the soul is immortal. The verb to exist is never properly used as a mere copula, but points to things that stand forth, or have a substantive being; as, when the soul is freed from all corporeal alliance, then it truly exists. It is not, therefore, properly synonymous with to be when used as a copula, though occasionally made so by some writers for the sake of variety; as in the phrase ``there exists [is] no reason for laying new taxes.'' We may, indeed, say, ``a friendship has long existed between them,'' instead of saying, ``there has long been a friendship between them;'' but in this case, exist is not a mere copula. It is used in its appropriate sense to mark the friendship as having been long in existence.

Being

Being \Be"ing\, adv. Since; inasmuch as. [Obs. or Colloq.]

And being you have Declined his means, you have increased his malice.
--Beau. & Fl.

Being

Being \Be"ing\, p. pr. from Be. Existing.

Note: Being was formerly used where we now use having. ``Being to go to a ball in a few days.''
--Miss Edgeworth.

Note: In modern usage, is, are, was or were being, with a past participle following (as built, made, etc.) indicates the process toward the completed result expressed by the participle. The form is or was building, in this passive signification, is idiomatic, and, if free from ambiguity, is commonly preferable to the modern is or was being built. The last form of speech is, however, sufficiently authorized by approved writers. The older expression was is, or was, a-building or in building.

A man who is being strangled.
--Lamb.

While the article on Burns was being written.
--Froude.

Fresh experience is always being gained.
--Jowett (Thucyd. )

Being

Being \Be"ing\, n.

  1. Existence, as opposed to nonexistence; state or sphere of existence.

    In Him we live, and move, and have our being.
    --Acts xvii. 28.

  2. That which exists in any form, whether it be material or spiritual, actual or ideal; living existence, as distinguished from a thing without life; as, a human being; spiritual beings.

    What a sweet being is an honest mind !
    --Beau. & Fl.

    A Being of infinite benevolence and power.
    --Wordsworth.

  3. Lifetime; mortal existence. [Obs.]

    Claudius, thou Wast follower of his fortunes in his being.
    --Webster (1654).

  4. An abode; a cottage. [Prov. Eng.]
    --Wright.

    It was a relief to dismiss them [Sir Roger's servants] into little beings within my manor.
    --Steele.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
being

c.1300, "condition, state, circumstances; presence, fact of existing," early 14c., existence," from be + -ing. Sense of "that which physically exists, person or thing" (as in human being) is from late 14c.

Wiktionary
being

conj. (context obsolete English) Given that; since. n. 1 A living creature. 2 The state or fact of existence, consciousness, or life, or something in such a state. 3 (context philosophy English) That which has actuality (materially or in concept). 4 (context philosophy English) One's basic nature, or the qualities thereof; essence or personality. 5 (context obsolete English) An abode; a cottage. vb. (present participle of be English)

WordNet
being
  1. n. the state or fact of existing; "a point of view gradually coming into being"; "laws in existence for centuries" [syn: beingness, existence] [ant: nonexistence, nonbeing]

  2. a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently [syn: organism]

Wikipedia
Being (Kotoko song)

"being" is the fifth single by Kotoko under Geneon Entertainment. The title track was used as the second opening theme for the anime series Shakugan no Shana. As of January 2014, this remains Kotoko's most successful single since it peaked at #4 in the Oricon charts and sold a total of 34,736 copies.

Being (album)

Being is a 1974 album by the Finnish progressive rock group Wigwam.

Being

Being is what one who is sentient is in the way of mind, body, spirit, and their union, and what one knows about these things and those of similar life forms. What individuals (i.e., human beings) have in terms of relating and inter-relating form and expression is an extremely broad concept encompassing objective and subjective features of reality and existence. Anything that partakes in being is also called a "being", though often this use is limited to entities that have subjectivity (as in the expression " human being"). So broad a notion has inevitably been elusive and controversial in the history of philosophy, beginning in western philosophy with attempts among the pre-Socratics to deploy it intelligibly.

As an example of efforts in recent times, Martin Heidegger (who himself drew on ancient Greek sources) adopted German terms like Dasein to articulate the topic. Several modern approaches build on such continental European exemplars as Heidegger, and apply metaphysical results to the understanding of human psychology and the human condition generally (notably in the Existentialist tradition).

By contrast, in mainstream analytical philosophy the topic is more confined to abstract investigation, in the work of such influential theorists as W. V. O. Quine, to name one of many. One most fundamental question that continues to exercise philosophers is put by William James: "How comes the world to be here at all instead of the nonentity which might be imagined in its place? … from nothing to being there is no logical bridge."

Being (disambiguation)

Being is an extremely broad concept encompassing objective and subjective features of reality and existence.

Being may also refer to:

Being (Lali Esposito song)

Being is track number 8 by the singer,actress and model Lali Esposito, from her first studio album A Bailar

Usage examples of "being".

In truth, she wondered that Tane did not suspect Asara of being an Aberrant, but it seemed that he would rather not know.

I will not wear thy soul with words about my grief and sorrow: but it is to be told that I sat now in a perilous place, and yet I might not step down from it and abide in that land, for then it was a sure thing, that some of my foes would have laid hand on me and brought me to judgment for being but myself, and I should have ended miserably.

Now Ralph, he and his, being known for friends, these wild men could not make enough of them, and as it were, compelled them to abide there three days, feasting them, and making them all the cheer they might.

With the exception of Harry Keeler, who posed a direct threat to the Abiders, he had yet to see or hear of an Interloper killing a human being.

She gave every appearance of being concerned, though Abigail knew she was not.

Will pegged as physically being able to visit those other realms, he had a hard time accepting their existence and his ability to travel to them.

But it must be understood that this refers to one who had made her abjuration as one manifestly taken in heresy, or as one strongly suspected of heresy, and not to one who has so done as being under only a light suspicion.

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

Nearly every item that came aboard was subject to a gentle touch of his hand before being taken below.

Harry, is that if the orders were lying about for all to see, with sailors being the gossips they are then the men aboard any ship in the harbour would soon be appraised of their contents.

Munday the 25 being Christmas day, we began to drinke water aboord, but at night, the Master caused vs to have some Beere, and so on board we had diverse times now and then some Beere, but on shore none at all.

There was a great deal of social stigma attached to being Aboriginal at our school.

Nan was younger, Aborigines were considered sub-normal and not capable of being educated the way whites were.

In physique he closely resembled the Aliansa, being tall and robust and with a face less humanoid than the aborigines of the Mire and Mountain.

But no human being loved the aborigines more, nor stood ready to lay down her life for them if it were necessary.