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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
asthma
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
AIDS/cancer/asthma/arthritis etc sufferers
▪ a support group for cancer sufferers
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
severe
▪ The condition of the 60 year-old actress, who is believed to have suffered a severe asthma attack, worsened since yesterday.
▪ He had severe asthma, and a doctor suggested he try a sport that took him away from grass and pollen.
▪ His health began to fail as a result of severe attacks of asthma.
▪ Immunology recommends allergy shots as an effective way to control moderate to severe asthma.
▪ The two-year Hopkins study dealt with children who suffer year-round from moderate to severe asthma caused by allergies.
■ NOUN
attack
▪ The deaths linked to Zyban include heart attacks, suicides, brain disorders and asthma attacks.
▪ Still, the smell of smoke inevitably triggers an asthma attack.
▪ Each practitioner was invited to record details of all patients who presented with an asthma attack during a predetermined three month period.
▪ There are a number of medications available to treat asthma attacks and to prevent attacks in the first place.
▪ The police tear-gassed all the university dorms: people had asthma attacks and a girl had her wrist broken.
▪ Doing so allows the inflammation to reoccur and an asthma attack can follow shortly.
▪ It can assist in diminishing the effects of an asthma attack and is an integral part of the childbirth process.
▪ Proponents say the changes will prevent 8,300 premature deaths each year-5,500 cases of chronic bronchitis and 360,000 asthma attacks.
sufferer
▪ One child in ten is affected and, in 1990, there were 98 deaths among five-to-24-year-old asthma sufferers.
▪ Of course, large hurdles remain before asthma sufferers can breathe easier.
▪ But frequently the asthma sufferer learned to hold back both feelings because neither are acceptable to the family.
▪ Environmental groups say the current air standards are inadequate to protect the health of asthma sufferers and others with lung diseases.
▪ The study offers hope to allergy and asthma sufferers, Bloom said.
■ VERB
suffer
▪ In later years she suffered severely from asthma.
▪ There he's caught up in a gas attack, and when he returns to Swindon he suffers recurring asthma.
▪ If Richard, who suffers badly from asthma, had children, they might not get asthma.
▪ Frederick was plagued with one illness after another throughout his childhood, mainly suffering from asthma and other breathing problems.
▪ The condition of the 60 year-old actress, who is believed to have suffered a severe asthma attack, worsened since yesterday.
▪ Shona died at the scene and Gavin, who suffers from asthma, was in a critical condition last night.
▪ Lock forward Bayfield had to leave the pitch while playing for Northampton after suffering an asthma attack.
treat
▪ There was one fascinating lecture on chirality and organic synthesis including the design of Salbutamol, a drug used to treat asthma.
▪ There are a number of medications available to treat asthma attacks and to prevent attacks in the first place.
▪ She was visiting Glasgow's Western Infirmary to learn about pioneering work to find new ways to treat asthma.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Frederick was plagued with one illness after another throughout his childhood, mainly suffering from asthma and other breathing problems.
▪ If Richard, who suffers badly from asthma, had children, they might not get asthma.
▪ Of course, large hurdles remain before asthma sufferers can breathe easier.
▪ Or you have an asthma attack?
▪ Over time, you should be able to recognize your own asthma triggers and develop a prevention or treatment plan for them.
▪ She's coped with asthma and she's sure her children could.
▪ There are a number of medications available to treat asthma attacks and to prevent attacks in the first place.
▪ We were later told about Piggy's asthma which stopped him from doing many physical things like swimming and running.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Asthma

Asthma \Asth"ma\ (?; 277), n. [Gr. ? short-drawn breath, fr. ? to blow, for ?: cf. Skr. v[=a], Goth. waian, to blow, E. wind.] (Med.) A disease, characterized by difficulty of breathing (due to a spasmodic contraction of the bronchi), recurring at intervals, accompanied with a wheezing sound, a sense of constriction in the chest, a cough, and expectoration.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
asthma

late 14c. asma, asma, from Latin asthma, from Greek asthma "short breath, a panting," from azein "breathe hard," probably related to anemos "wind." The -th- was restored in English 16c.

Wiktionary
asthma

n. (context pathology English) A long-term respiratory condition, in which the airways may unexpectedly and suddenly narrow, often in response to an allergen, cold air, exercise, or emotional stress. Symptoms include wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing.

WordNet
asthma

n. respiratory disorder characterized by wheezing; usually of allergic origin [syn: asthma attack, bronchial asthma]

Wikipedia
Asthma

Asthma is a common long term inflammatory disease of the airways of the lungs. It is characterized by variable and recurring symptoms, reversible airflow obstruction, and bronchospasm. Symptoms include episodes of wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath. These episodes may occur a few times a day or a few times per week. Depending on the person they may become worse at night or with exercise.

Asthma is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Environmental factors include exposure to air pollution and allergens. Other potential triggers include medications such as aspirin and beta blockers. Diagnosis is usually based on the pattern of symptoms, response to therapy over time, and spirometry. Asthma is classified according to the frequency of symptoms, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and peak expiratory flow rate. It may also be classified as atopic or non-atopic where atopy refers to a predisposition toward developing a type 1 hypersensitivity reaction.

There is no cure for asthma. Symptoms can be prevented by avoiding triggers, such as allergens and irritants, and by the use of inhaled corticosteroids. Long-acting beta agonists (LABA) or antileukotriene agents may be used in addition to inhaled corticosteroids if asthma symptoms remain uncontrolled. Treatment of rapidly worsening symptoms is usually with an inhaled short-acting beta-2 agonist such as salbutamol and corticosteroids taken by mouth. In very severe cases, intravenous corticosteroids, magnesium sulfate, and hospitalization may be required.

In 2013, 242 million people globally had asthma up from 183 million in 1990. It caused about 489,000 deaths in 2013, most of which occurred in the developing world. It often begins in childhood. The rates of asthma have increased significantly since the 1960s. Asthma was recognized as early as Ancient Egypt. The word asthma is from the Greek ἅσθμα, ásthma which means "panting".

Asthma (disambiguation)

Asthma, Asthmatic or Asthma attack may refer to:

  • Asthma, a predisposition of the respiratory system in which the airways are predisposed to bronchoconstriction
  • Asthmatic, a song by Spineshank from their 2000 album Height of Callousness
  • Asthmatic, a song by King Adora from their 2001 album Vibrate You
  • Asthmatic, a person with the predisposition
  • Asthma Attack, an instance of bronchioconstriction in an asthmatic
  • Asthma Attack, a song by The Fiery Furnaces from their 2003 album Gallowsbird's Bark
  • Asthma, a song by P.O.D. from their 2003 album Payable on Death
  • Occupational asthma or asthme is an occupational condition defined as:

Usage examples of "asthma".

While asthma is not a disease that seems primarily associated with aging, its implications for aging are important.

What else would Lily Bede collect but his bete noir, the one remaining tie to the asthma that had molded and cursed his earliest years?

Did Octavian have asthma, it makes everything that happened to him during that campaign in Macedonia logical, including his fleeing to the sea breezes and cleaner air of the salt marshes while dry ground was fogged by a suffocating pall of chaffy dust.

Disneyland, Jeanine Hilt had an acute asthma attack, went into respiratory failure, and suffered oxygen deprivation so severe that she lost all brain function: in other words, she developed hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, exactly the same fate that had befallen Lia.

Meth is speed and it is made by cooking asthma medicine called ephedrine, formaldehyde, sometimes gas or fertilizer, and baking powder.

It was a cure for impurities of the blood, coughs, pleurisy, peripneumony, erysipelas, asthma, indigestion, carchexia, hysterics, dropsy, mortification, scurvy, and hypochondria.

Numbers of all diseased--all maladies Of ghastly spasm, or racking torture, qualms Of heart-sick agony, all feverous kinds, Convulsions, epilepsies, fierce catarrhs, Intestine stone and ulcer, colic pangs, Demoniac frenzy, moping melancholy, And moon-struck madness, pining atrophy, Marasmus, and wide-wasting pestilence, Dropsies and asthmas, and joint-racking rheums.

Add in the respiratory infections, the bouquet of asthmas, cystic fibrosis, miliary TB.

The table held more pill bottles than ever-Selestone for his asthma, Ativan to help him sleep, naproxen for infections-along with a powdered milk mix and laxatives.

A general practitioner for the first time in his career, David suddenly found himself treating asthma, roseola, croup, enlarged prostate, insomnia, and peptic ulcers.

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS are annually spent upon the advice of physicians, in traveling expenses, and hotel bills, by sufferers from asthma, or phthisic, in seeking a change of climate that will be advantageous.

Sometimes it is spasmodic and irritating and particularly so when it is associated with affections of the larynx, or with asthma, involving irritation of the branches or the filaments of the pneumogastric nerve.

There is yet another group of asthmatic subjects in whom the asthma is due to some chronic or repeated infection, such as attacks of tonsillitis, sinusitis, or nasal catarrh.

For instance, when a human gets an asthma attack, his bronchioles close up.

Sister says when he comes will you ask him for some morphia for the two hernias and the appendix that were done to-day, and to say can he give you something for the asthma in number seven.