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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Arsenate

Arsenate \Ar"se*nate\, n. (Chem.) A salt of arsenic acid.

Wiktionary
arsenate

n. 1 (context chemistry English) Any salt or ester of arsenic acid. 2 (context chemistry English) The anion AsO43-.

WordNet
arsenate

n. a salt or ester of arsenic acid

Wikipedia
Arsenate

The arsenate ion is . An arsenate (compound) is any compound that contains this ion. Arsenates are salts or esters of arsenic acid. The arsenic atom in arsenate has a valency of 5 and is also known as pentavalent arsenic or As(V). Arsenate resembles phosphate in many respects, since arsenic and phosphorus occur in the same group (column) of the periodic table. Arsenates are moderate oxidizers, with an electrode potential of +0.56  V for reduction to arsenites.

Usage examples of "arsenate".

The small quantity of white flocculent precipitate which may be observed in the acetic acid solution before titrating, contains the whole of the iron as ferric arsenate.

If, after adding excess of silver nitrate to insure a complete precipitation, the arsenate of silver be filtered off, the weight of the arsenic could be estimated from the weight of silver arsenate formed.

It oxidises most combustible substances with deflagration, and thereby converts sulphides into sulphates, arsenides into arsenates, and most metals into oxides.

The metals generally remain in the form of oxide, mixed with more or less sulphate and arsenate.

It is used for the purpose of separating phosphoric oxide from bases and from other acids, and also as a test for phosphates and arsenates.

These combine with bases to form arsenites and arsenates respectively.

In the depths of punctured vugs, needlelike clusters of fragile silicates and bladed arsenates sparkled with the promise of new combinations of elements.

Then too, it was entirely possible that the presence in the vicinity of magnificently crystallized arsenates might have imbued the pools with something much worse than bad taste.

The thick liquid did indeed contain salts, but they were neither arsenates nor other poisonous derivatives of the minerals over which he was walking.

It was sprayed onto fruit as a pesticide in the form of lead arsenate.