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youths
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Youths

Youth \Youth\ ([=u]th), n.; pl. Youths ([=u]ths; 264) or collectively Youth. [OE. youthe, youh[thorn]e, [yogh]uhe[eth]e, [yogh]uwe[eth]e, [yogh]eo[yogh]e[eth]e, AS. geogu[eth], geogo[eth]; akin to OS. jugu[eth], D. jeugd, OHG. jugund, G. jugend, Goth. junda. [root]28

  1. See Young.] 1. The quality or state of being young; youthfulness; juvenility. ``In my flower of youth.''
    --Milton.

    Such as in his face Youth smiled celestial.
    --Milton.

  2. The part of life that succeeds to childhood; the period of existence preceding maturity or age; the whole early part of life, from childhood, or, sometimes, from infancy, to manhood.

    He wondered that your lordship Would suffer him to spend his youth at home.
    --Shak.

    Those who pass their youth in vice are justly condemned to spend their age in folly.
    --Rambler.

  3. A young person; especially, a young man.

    Seven youths from Athens yearly sent.
    --Dryden.

  4. Young persons, collectively.

    It is fit to read the best authors to youth first.
    --B. Jonson.

Wiktionary
youths

n. (plural of youth English)

Usage examples of "youths".

The youths he trained in the exercise of arms, and near his own person: to the damsels he gave a liberal and Roman education, and by bestowing them in marriage on some of his principal officers, gradually introduced between the two nations the closest and most endearing connections.

It was stipulated by the same treaty, that three royal youths, the sons of emperors, should be called to the hopes of the succession.

The youths of a promising genius were instructed in the arts and sciences, and their price was ascertained by the degree of their skill and talents.

He reminded the assembly of the evils which Rome had endured from the vices of headstrong and capricious youths, congratulated them on the election of a virtuous and experienced senator, and, with a manly, though perhaps a selfish, freedom, exhorted Tacitus to remember the reasons of his elevation, and to seek a successor, not in his own family, but in the republic.

The servile and profligate youths whom Marcus had banished, soon regained their station and influence about the new emperor.

The former tyrants, Caligula and Nero, Commodus, and Caracalla, were all dissolute and inexperienced youths, educated in the purple, and corrupted by the pride of empire, the luxury of Rome, and the perfidious voice of flattery.

An iniquitous sentence had been pronounced against some opulent youths of that country, the execution of which would have stripped them of far the greater part of their patrimony.

To be ever surrounded by a band of select youths was the pride and strength of the chiefs, their ornament in peace, their defence in war.

These fortunate youths were strangers, however, to that conscious superiority, either of birth or of merit, which can alone render the possession of a throne easy, and as it were natural.

The youths to whose licentious embraces they were abandoned received a solemn exhortation from the judge, to exert their most strenuous efforts to maintain the honor of Venus against the impious virgin who refused to burn incense on her altars.

The magistrates of the most distant provinces were therefore directed to institute schools, to appoint professors, and by the hopes of rewards and privileges, to engage in the study and practice of architecture a sufficient number of ingenious youths, who had received a liberal education.

The whole empire was deeply interested in the education of these five youths, the acknowledged successors of Constantine.

The most celebrated professors of the Christian faith, of the Grecian philosophy, and of the Roman jurisprudence, were invited by the liberality of the emperor, who reserved for himself the important task of instructing the royal youths in the science of government, and the knowledge of mankind.

This justice was rigorously inflicted on some unfortunate youths of a royal race.

Yet they rallied in their extreme distress, and the martial youths, who had clamorously demanded the battle, refused to survive the ignominy of flight.