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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
tunic
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blue
▪ Watching a youth in a blue tunic and spangles performing on the slack rope, he determined to attempt a similar feat.
white
▪ He wore a red-and-gold headdress, and a white tunic trimmed with the same colours.
▪ A meat saw roared, scattering sawdust, worked by a butcher in a white tunic.
■ VERB
wear
▪ They would come back on leave and wear their scarlet tunics in the dale.
▪ All of them were wearing brown cotton tunics because of a promise I had made on the very first day of construction.
▪ It was bitterly cold, and Killion wore Dickinson's tunic.
▪ He wore a light yellow tunic which reached the knee, and on his feet were leather sandals with decorated metal buckles.
▪ He was wearing the tunic in which he had been shot down.
▪ Otherwise, out of doors, more practical hooded cloaks were worn over knee-length tunics.
▪ Of rather grim appearance, she wore a tunic of writhing snakes.
▪ It is equally important when she is wearing a soft tunic or one-piece tights and leotard.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All of them were wearing brown cotton tunics because of a promise I had made on the very first day of construction.
▪ Behind the big drum came the band of four musicians dressed in loose black tunics and black pillbox hats.
▪ Knee-length tunics, loose and thin, moved with each step.
▪ The tunic was piped in branch-colour around the collar, deep cuffs, and down the front edge.
▪ They would come back on leave and wear their scarlet tunics in the dale.
▪ Watching a youth in a blue tunic and spangles performing on the slack rope, he determined to attempt a similar feat.
▪ Why are there fleurs-de-lys on his tunic?
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Tunic

Tunic \Tu"nic\, n. [L. tunica: cf. F. tunique.]

  1. (Rom. Antiq.) An under-garment worn by the ancient Romans of both sexes. It was made with or without sleeves, reached to or below the knees, and was confined at the waist by a girdle.

  2. Any similar garment worm by ancient or Oriental peoples; also, a common name for various styles of loose-fitting under-garments and over-garments worn in modern times by Europeans and others.

  3. (R. C. Ch.) Same as Tunicle.

  4. (Anat.) A membrane, or layer of tissue, especially when enveloping an organ or part, as the eye.

  5. (Bot.) A natural covering; an integument; as, the tunic of a seed.

  6. (Zo["o]l.) See Mantle, n., 3 (a) .

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
tunic

late 15c., from Middle French tunique (12c.) or directly from Latin tunica "undergarment worn by either sex" (source of Spanish tunica, Italian tonica, Old English tunece, Old High German tunihha), probably from a Semitic source (compare Hebrew kuttoneth "coat," Aramaic kittuna). Also see chitin.

Wiktionary
tunic

n. A garment worn over the torso, with or without sleeves, and of various lengths reaching from the hips to the ankles.

WordNet
tunic
  1. n. an enveloping or covering membrane or layer of body tissue [syn: tunica, adventitia]

  2. any of a variety of loose fitting cloaks extending to the hips or knees

Wikipedia
Tunic

A tunic is any of several types of garment for the body, usually simple in style, reaching from the shoulders to a length somewhere between the hips and the ankles. The name derives from the Latintunica, the basic garment worn by both men and women in Ancient Rome, which in turn was based on earlier Greek garments that covered people around their waist.

Tunic (military)

A military tunic is a type of medium length coat or jacket, the lower hem of which reaches down to the thighs all the way round. It is named after the tunic, a garment of similar length worn in Ancient Rome.

Usage examples of "tunic".

Tiriki scampered into the room, her silky fair hair all aflutter about the elfin face, her small tunic torn, one pink foot sandalled and the other bare, whose rapid uneven steps bore her swiftly to Domaris.

Her expression was grim, but she showed no surprise when he shrugged out of his tunic, squirmed into a padded buckram aketon, and lifted his scale shirt from its rack.

Stepping away as far as he could, Alec pulled the harp string from his tunic and waved it like a pass.

She pulled the collar of her tunic up over her mouth to protect her teeth from the algid air she breathed.

I tucked myself back into my bra and, still clutching the aquamanile, buttoned up my tunic.

The young Arend had changed out of his garish clothing and now wore brown hose, a green tunic, and a dark-brown wool cape.

He was undressing and folding his tunic when Argan walked slowly through the hatch, clearly trying to control each step.

Then, as he bent over the sword, the thong-tied, golden ring fell out from his tunic, swinging in front of him like a subtle message from the mighty god Axan himself.

He clenched his fist over the golden axes on his black tunic coat and bowed jerkily from the waist.

The street they were following crossed a small square in which a wildly gesticulating ayatollah clad in a yellow tunic and green smock was haranguing a crowd pressed from wall to wall.

He was simply but well dressed in an indigo buffin tunic and leather breeches.

Both the Gate-guards were clad in loose-fitting tunics belted at the middle, taltry-hoods with camails, and cross-gartered breeches tucked into boots.

The priests and priestesses of Azza wore saffron tunics with the crimson chlamys, or half-cloak, fastened with bronze brooches.

He was dried on towels of fine linen, perfumed with chypre and dressed in saffron-dyed linen breeches and a long tunic.

Under his jubbah Cipres wore a tunic of white damask that Tirant had given him with the cross of Saint George embroidered on it.