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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
slate
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a slate roof (=covered with thin pieces of a grey rock)
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
blank
▪ Start with a blank slate in the new year.
clean
▪ The bambina hardly knows me, let's give her, too, a start on a clean slate.
▪ Many academics really do believe that all of us are now beginning once again with a clean slate.
▪ The new-born child is virtually a clean slate, to be written on by the world.
▪ Orson Pratt, one of the originals, stressed the clean slate of history on which they wrote.
▪ Although there is never a clean slate on which to start planning, the new start provides the necessity for such planning.
▪ He wanted to use the subsidiary as a totally clean slate and he wanted true collaboration from the beginning.
▪ When things go wrong Many people today believe that children begin life with a clean slate.
▪ Standard variable cost is better as any inefficiencies stay in the transferring division and the receiving division starts with a clean slate.
grey
▪ There was another Bentley outside the grey slate Gothic place with a smart yellow Cortina snuggling up against it.
▪ The pink brick and grey slate was catching the dying rays of the sun.
▪ It had a grey slate roof and one small chimney, and there were two little windows at the front.
▪ Dark grey Hardrow slates were specified to give the scheme a natural and mature appearance from the outset.
▪ His eyes were dull like slate, grey like slate.
▪ A white cottage with a grey slate roof and a black chimney and a bright butter-yellow front door.
▪ The grey slates and shales of the Silurian rock are obvious as you walk.
■ NOUN
quarry
▪ It depended for its prosperity on the local slate quarries and when these ran into trouble so did the railway.
▪ The giant slate quarries and tips of waste rock at Llanberis and Bethesda are great scars on the landscape.
▪ We then cycled uphill to the town of Rosebush with its deserted slate quarries.
▪ Many Lake District slate quarries are still working, but of course modern roads and vehicles make the job much less dangerous now.
▪ Both slate quarries are open daily April to October, 100.00 a.m. -5.30 p.m.
▪ From directly above them came a noise like an explosion in a slate quarry.
roof
▪ Dorchester Terrace was a row of tall red houses with sloping slate roofs.
▪ Ranks of houses stretched away into the distance like waves breaking on a rocky shore, their slate roofs glistening.
▪ All can be used with tile-covered roofs, or as a contrast, with slate roofs.
▪ Porous state My slate roof is leaking through general wear.
▪ It had a grey slate roof and one small chimney, and there were two little windows at the front.
▪ At the foot of the bed, a window looked out on dip-backed slate roofs.
▪ Outside the snow was already melting on the slate roofs of the houses.
▪ Because the sun shone so brightly the slate roof blazed like a slab of silver.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
clean sheet/slate
▪ A clean sheet of blotting paper should be in the blotter. 5.
▪ Everton's record of failing to keep a clean sheet in 15 matches soon looked ominously likely to continue.
▪ He wanted to use the subsidiary as a totally clean slate and he wanted true collaboration from the beginning.
▪ Hereford just can't keep a clean sheet and their lowly league position reflects that.
▪ Orson Pratt, one of the originals, stressed the clean slate of history on which they wrote.
▪ The new-born child is virtually a clean slate, to be written on by the world.
▪ They are treading unfamiliar ground in the relegation zone and have failed to keep a clean sheet this season.
▪ When things go wrong Many people today believe that children begin life with a clean slate.
wipe the slate clean
▪ It would be nice if we could wipe the slate clean and start over.
▪ First among these was the introduction of penances which, it was hoped, would wipe the slate clean.
▪ We must start wiping the slate clean of all such inner accounting.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A third candidate, radio talk show host Alan Keyes, filed a partial slate.
▪ Best Director nominees usually parallel the Best Picture slate with one exception.
▪ In a spirit of community service, books and slates appeared.
▪ Many academics really do believe that all of us are now beginning once again with a clean slate.
▪ The falls of the flowers are a delicate yellowish green veined with slate blue.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
clean sheet/slate
▪ A clean sheet of blotting paper should be in the blotter. 5.
▪ Everton's record of failing to keep a clean sheet in 15 matches soon looked ominously likely to continue.
▪ He wanted to use the subsidiary as a totally clean slate and he wanted true collaboration from the beginning.
▪ Hereford just can't keep a clean sheet and their lowly league position reflects that.
▪ Orson Pratt, one of the originals, stressed the clean slate of history on which they wrote.
▪ The new-born child is virtually a clean slate, to be written on by the world.
▪ They are treading unfamiliar ground in the relegation zone and have failed to keep a clean sheet this season.
▪ When things go wrong Many people today believe that children begin life with a clean slate.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Council deliberations on the budget are slated for June 25, 26, 27 and 30.
▪ Fratney had been slated to be closed and reopened as what was to be called an Exemplary Teaching Center.
▪ He was slated for his tactics when they went wrong, but how often did that happen?
▪ Old Navy flagship sites in Chicago and Seattle also are slated to open in 1998.
▪ The flight is slated for launching between Dec. 2 and Dec. 27 from Cape Canaveral.
▪ The project is slated for completion in 1999.
▪ They were slated as Wedding Present imitators and never escaped the suffocating connection with the band.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Slate

Slate \Slate\ (sl[=a]t), n. [OE. slat, sclat, OF. esclat a shiver, splinter, F. ['e]clat, fr. OF. esclater to shiver, to chip, F. ['e]clater, fr. OHG. sleizen to tear, slit, split, fr. sl[=i]zan to slit, G. schleissen. See Slit, v. t., and cf. Eclat.]

  1. (Min.) An argillaceous rock which readily splits into thin plates; argillite; argillaceous schist.

  2. Any rock or stone having a slaty structure.

  3. A prepared piece of such stone. Especially:

    1. A thin, flat piece, for roofing or covering houses, etc.

    2. A tablet for writing upon.

  4. An artificial material, resembling slate, and used for the above purposes.

  5. A thin plate of any material; a flake. [Obs.]

  6. (Politics) A list of candidates, prepared for nomination or for election; a list of candidates, or a programme of action, devised beforehand. [Cant, U.S.]
    --Bartlett.

    Adhesive slate (Min.), a kind of slate of a greenish gray color, which absorbs water rapidly, and adheres to the tongue; whence the name.

    Aluminous slate, or Alum slate (Min.), a kind of slate containing sulphate of alumina, -- used in the manufacture of alum.

    Bituminous slate (Min.), a soft species of sectile clay slate, impregnated with bitumen.

    Hornblende slate (Min.), a slaty rock, consisting essentially of hornblende and feldspar, useful for flagging on account of its toughness.

    Slate ax or Slate axe, a mattock with an ax end, used in shaping slates for roofs, and making holes in them for the nails.

    Slate clay (Geol.), an indurated clay, forming one of the alternating beds of the coal measures, consisting of an infusible compound of alumina and silica, and often used for making fire bricks.
    --Tomlinson.

    Slate globe, a globe the surface of which is made of an artificial slatelike material.

    Slate pencil, a pencil of slate, or of soapstone, used for writing on a slate.

    Slate rocks (Min.), rocks which split into thin lamin[ae], not necessarily parallel to the stratification; foliated rocks.

    Slate spar (Min.), a variety of calcite of silvery white luster and of a slaty structure.

    Transparent slate, a plate of translucent material, as ground glass, upon which a copy of a picture, placed beneath it, can be made by tracing.

Slate

Slate \Slate\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Slated; p. pr. & vb. n. Slating.]

  1. To cover with slate, or with a substance resembling slate; as, to slate a roof; to slate a globe.

  2. To register (as on a slate and subject to revision), for an appointment. [Polit. Cant]

  3. To schedule.

  4. To reserve or designate for a specific purpose.

Slate

Slate \Slate\, v. t. [Cf. AS. sl[=ae]ting a privilege of hunting.] To set a dog upon; to bait; to slat. See 2d Slat, 3. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [Written also slete.]
--Ray.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
slate

mid-14c., from Old French esclate, fem. of esclat "split piece, splinter" (Modern French éclat; see slat), so called because the rock splits easily into thin plates. As an adjective, 1510s. As a color, first recorded 1813. Sense of "a writing tablet" (made of slate), first recorded late 14c., led to that of "list of preliminary candidates prepared by party managers," first recorded 1842, from notion of being easily altered or erased. Clean slate (1856) is an image from customer accounts chalked up in a tavern.

slate

1520s, "to cover with slates" (earlier sclatten, late 15c.), from slate (n.). Meaning "propose, schedule" is from 1883; earlier "to nominate" (1804); the notion is of writing on a slate board. Related: Slated; slating.

Wiktionary
slate
  1. Having the bluish-grey/gray colour/color of slate. n. 1 (context uncountable English) A fine-grained homogeneous sedimentary rock composed of clay or volcanic ash which has been metamorphosed so that it cleaves easily into thin layers. 2 (context uncountable English) The bluish-grey colour of most slate. 3 (context countable English) A sheet of slate for writing on with chalk or with a thin rod of slate (a slate pencil) formerly commonly used by younger children for writing practice in schools. 4 (context countable English) A roofing-tile made of slate. 5 (context countable English) A record of money owed. 6 (context countable chiefly US English) A list of affiliated candidates for an election. 7 An artificial material resembling slate and used for the same purposes. 8 A thin plate of any material; a flake. v

  2. 1 To cover with slate. 2 (context chiefly British English) To criticise harshly. 3 (context chiefly US English) To schedule. 4 (context chiefly US English) To destine or strongly expect. 5 To punish severely.

WordNet
slate
  1. n. (formerly) a writing tablet made of slate

  2. thin layers of rock used for roofing [syn: slating]

  3. a fine-grained metamorphic rock that can be split into thin layers

  4. a list of candidates nominated by a political party to run for election to public offices [syn: ticket]

slate
  1. v. designate or schedule; "He slated his talk for 9 AM"; "She was slated to be his successor"

  2. enter on a list or slate for an election; "He was slated for borough president"

  3. cover with slate; "slate the roof"

Gazetteer
Wikipedia
SLATE

SLATE, a pioneer organization of the New Left and precursor of the Free Speech Movement and formative counterculture era, was a campus political party at the University of California, Berkeley from 1958 to 1966.

Slate (disambiguation)

Slate is a type of rock, often used for roofing.

Slate may also refer to:

  • Slate turkey, a breed of domestic fowl
  • Slate (writing), a material for writing on
  • Slate (surname)
  • Slate board ( clapperboard), a device used during film production
  • Slate gray, a color
  • Slate and stylus, tools used by blind persons to write and read
  • Slate (typeface), a neo-grotesque typeface
Slate (writing)
Slate (elections)

A slate is a group of candidates that run in multi-seat or multi-position elections on a common platform.

The common platform may be because the candidates are all members of a political party, have the same or similar policies, or some other reason.

Slate (magazine)

Slate is an English-language online current affairs, politics and culture magazine in the United States created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley, initially under the ownership of Microsoft as part of MSN. On 21 December 2004, it was purchased by The Washington Post Company, later renamed the Graham Holdings Company. Since 4 June 2008, Slate has been managed by The Slate Group, an online publishing entity created by the Graham Holdings Company to develop and manage web-only magazines. Slate is based in New York City, with an additional office in Washington DC.

A French version (slate.fr) was launched in February 2009 by a group of four journalists, including Jean-Marie Colombani, Eric Leser, and economist Jacques Attali. Among them, the founders hold 50% in the publishing company, while The Slate Group holds 15%. In 2011, slate.fr started a separate site covering African news, Slate Afrique, with a Paris-based editorial staff.

In July 2014, Julia Turner replaced David Plotz, who had been editor of Slate since 2008. Plotz had been the deputy editor to Jacob Weisberg, Slate's editor from 2002 until his designation as the Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of The Slate Group. The Washington Post Company's John Alderman is Slates publisher.

Slate , which is updated daily, covers politics, arts and culture, sports, and news. According to Turner, the magazine is "not fundamentally a breaking news source," but rather aimed at helping readers to "analyze and understand and interpret the world" with witty and entertaining writing. As of mid-2015, it publishes about 1500 stories per month. Slate is known (and sometimes criticized) for adopting contrarian positions, giving rise to the term "Slate Pitches." It is ad-supported and has been available to read free of charge since 1999, but restricted access for non-US readers via a metered paywall in 2015.

Slate (typeface)

Slate is a neo-grotesque sans-serif typeface designed by Rod McDonald at Monotype Corporation in 2006, and it is designed for high levels of legibility. Slate Pro is the UI font of the BlackBerry 10 operating system.

McDonald had previously done research with the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) focusing on maximizing the legibility of characters and readability of text, and the Slate family was designed for maximum legibility for both print and screen. The Slate family is also a beautiful design, and as McDonald says "I didn't want a face with an 'engineered' look, or with any noticeable design gimmicks or devices."

Slate (surname)

Slate is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • Cody Slate (born 1987), American football player
  • Jenny Slate (born 1982), American actress and comedian
  • Jeremy Slate (1926–2006), American actor

Usage examples of "slate".

He felt a touch on his arm, and looked up to see the Archon again holding out the slate.

By the time they topped the last long hill that led down to the city, the steep slate roofs rising like a stone forest from the paler stones of the houses, the royal residence sitting on its artificial hill to the north as though it floated above the ordinary world, they could see the crowds gathering along the Horsegate Road.

Parchment Paper and Parchment Slates -- Double and Triple Osmotic Parchment -- Utilising Waste Parchment Paper -- Parchmented Linen and Cotton -- Parchment Millboard -- Imitation Horn and Ivory from Parchment Paper -- Imitation Parchment Paper -- Artificial Parchment -- Testing the Sulphuric Acid.

Even the churches, ancient chapels under moorstone slate roofs in shades of tawny yellow and green and russet, seemed gaunt and forbidding.

Sir Walter Palgrave, or am I to begin, as it were, with a clean slate?

The higgledly-piggledy line of the village houses with their uneven roof lines, crooked chimneys, thatch or slate roofs and pargeted or brick frontages, every detail deeply familiar, stood serenely unchanged.

Instead, it was slate gray, illuminated by several brilliantly lit stars, each haloed with iridescent color that reminded Lina of the pearlized belly of a seashell.

Big Eva was also slated for release from the penitentiary, since he had once been a bandit associate of Hondo Weatherbee, Doc had disguised himself to resemble Big Eva and offered himself as a sacrifice to see if he was guessing right.

But when she looked out on the gallery and saw the two black children, both of them barefoot, bending down attentively on each side of Flower while she showed them how to print their names in chalk on the piece of slate, Abigail felt a prescience about the future that was more optimistic than any she had experienced in years.

Using the stylus from her data slate as a pointer, she indicated the pulsar centered on the screen.

Windows were broken and covered by paper or stuffed with straw, street-doors had disappeared, gutters and waste-pipes hung crazily down the sides of the buildings, tufts of grass and weeds sprouted under the eaves, and on the rooves whole areas of slates were missing.

The seascape shrank as Harris ran south west along the Manx coast, rounding first Maughold, then slipping past the gray slate cliffs and steep sided coves until Laxey Bay opened to starboard.

Vredech took in the old tower with its stained and spalling rendering and its steeply pitched slate roof, dotted with spheres of moss.

Dylan for years had clung to this one face, bent over the slates as though they were sheets of Spirograph paper on the floor of his room, not noticing until too late that they were part of an edifice which curled past Bond and Nevins Street, into the unknown.

Skinner argued that the child, or animal, was at birth virtually a tabula rasa, physiologically competent, but behaviorally an empty slate on which experience would cut the grooves that would determine all subsequent patterns of function.