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Crossword clues for pants

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
pants
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a dog pants (=breathes quickly usually with its tongue hanging out)
▪ The dog was panting heavily beside her.
hot pants
scare the pants off sb (=scare someone very much)
ski pants
▪ a pair of ski pants
stirrup pants
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
baggy
▪ Self-destructive Melissa, that kooky chick who sometimes wore braces over a singlet to hold up her baggy pants.
▪ Suzanne, forty-something, looking respectable in baggy pants and a blouse, used to work here.
▪ It has to be bright, baggy tracksuit pants.
▪ The insurance companies hid behind my old coats and baggy pants and my boots with the run-over heels.
▪ It consists of a loose shirt, or tunic, with baggy pants, tied together in the middle with a belt.
▪ How about updating the context, dressing the youths in flannels and baggy pants?
▪ A chubby little man in a short-sleeved sport shirt and baggy gray twill pants came out the door.
black
▪ She dressed in an unvarying uniform of black ski pants and pink mohair pullover which became grubbier as the weeks passed.
▪ Tony Rich, wearing a fleece-trimmed black jacket with black satin pants and a derby.
▪ When not working the girls dressed alike in black tight pants, black leather jackets and black suede boots.
▪ Blue Mooney stood in the unlit doorway in his black pants, black shirt, black boots.
▪ She wears a large loose-knit white sweater and a pair of tight black pants.
▪ There is not a corpuscle to spare between her lean, muscular frame and her black Diesel pants.
▪ Ladies have sheer or bare legs, trendies cover up with black leather pants.
▪ But Tuesday night she appeared soft, relaxed and regal, even in a businesslike black pants suit.
blue
▪ He wears navy blue short pants and a little navy blue jacket with bright gold buttons.
▪ He wore white loafers, shiny blue nylon sweat pants, and a white golf shirt a size or two too small.
▪ The girl was lying on her side with her pink leotard and blue corduroy pants piled on top of her.
hot
▪ This time I was making hot pants and rainbow striped jumpers.
▪ She has graduated from the brown velvet hot pants of her stockbroker days to Armani, Ralph and Prada.
▪ Bikini bottoms look more like high-waisted hot pants, while swimsuits are squared off across the thighs or skirted.
▪ She got hot pants for this guy twice her age.
▪ Alexis's hot pants, £30; top £25, Juliette Spatchett at Hyper Hyper.
▪ For mock leather C&A waistcoats £21.99, jeans, £24.99, hot pants, £16.99.
khaki
▪ Kaczynski wore khaki pants and a long-sleeved green shirt during his appearance.
▪ His Saigon khaki pants were clean.
▪ Hanmer was wearing a white golf shirt and khaki pants he apparently used for gardening.
▪ Frank had a perfect bubble-butt and massive thigh muscles clearly outlined in his khaki pants.
▪ It was practically empty except for two middle-aged men in khaki pants and cotton shirts lounging over a quart of beer.
short
▪ His short pants have shoved up over the bare knees and one shows bloody scratches.
▪ He wears navy blue short pants and a little navy blue jacket with bright gold buttons.
▪ He was wearing only a sleeveless vest and a pair of short pants that reached almost to his bony knees.
▪ Some say the invaders wear short pants.
▪ The mice-children in these episodes wear sailor suits, or short pants with bibs and braces over little stripy jumpers.
▪ Every long table is filled with oldsters in their golden years costumes-juvenile ensembles of short pants, shirts, and sneakers.
▪ He never allowed his hands, his striped short pants or anything other than his polished shoes to touch the floor.
tight
▪ He led the way, his slim hips in the tight fitting pants snaking gracefully between the tables.
▪ Slight, fair, silk shirt, tight pants, and he walks as though he wants to wee-wee.
▪ When not working the girls dressed alike in black tight pants, black leather jackets and black suede boots.
▪ My costume fits O.K.; the tight velvet pants worked well in the dance routine work-through this morning.
▪ Though to be fair, in tight pants it's more of an undulating glide.
▪ She wears a large loose-knit white sweater and a pair of tight black pants.
white
▪ She wore black and white striped clown pants, baggy, with frills, and an oversized man's shirt.
▪ The players wore short-sleeve white shirts, long white pants and dark bow ties, with baseball caps and white sneakers.
▪ I bet you were shitting your elegant white pants when you heard I was here.
▪ He had bright white pants, black gym shoes.
▪ A delectably cool camisole and a pair of pure, white cotton pants.
White shirt, open at the neck; white pants, white shoes, white socks.
■ VERB
pull
▪ He held his hand over her mouth and tried to pull down her ski pants.
▪ Thereafter, the defendant must have pulled down her pants and tights and stabbed her private parts a number of times.
▪ Next year, George Clooney is going to pull his pants down for a guaranteed 55 share.
▪ Later, you pull up your pants and wait for the pain to go away.
▪ I reached over and pulled her pants back up.
▪ Seconds later, he was sidling, helping me pull down his pants.
▪ His checked shirt was pulled out of his pants, and his belly button was showing.
put
▪ As if this isn't difficult enough, she has to remember, too, to put the pants on before her trousers.
▪ He was so tired his bones ached; but he crawled out of bed, put on his pants and watch.
▪ I got up and dropped some pennies on the floor when I put my pants on.
▪ It was what allowed you to put your pants on in the morning.
▪ Would he have put it in his pants pocket?
scare
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ It took ten minutes to reach Honey Cottage, with Yanto trying his best to scare the pants off Mary.
▪ Lovely people who scared the pants off him.
wear
▪ She also wears skin-tight red pants.
▪ Like Angelita, who also helps them teach, but from her seat, Ilena is wearing pants.
▪ Why do I have to wear another man's pants?
▪ Kaczynski wore khaki pants and a long-sleeved green shirt during his appearance.
▪ I don't wear the pants.
▪ He wears navy blue short pants and a little navy blue jacket with bright gold buttons.
▪ Another habit that our ancestors would have frowned on was women wearing pants.
▪ Some say the invaders wear short pants.
wet
▪ Lewis beat him a further ten times, claimed Joe, who was so scared that he wet his pants.
▪ I almost wet in my pants before I got off the track to relieve myself.
▪ I dribbled, I wet my pants, even banged my head on the furniture, and bawled ... bawled almost nonstop.
▪ She was shifting from one foot to the other; she felt as if she was going to wet her pants.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a kick up the arse/backside/pants etc
▪ He was gormless, spoke in a funny nasal accent and looked as if he could do with a kick up the backside.
▪ I think I just needed a kick up the backside.
▪ They like to see officialdom and the upper classes getting a kick up the backside.
catch sb with their pants/trousers down
do sth by the seat of your pants
fly by the seat of your pants
have ants in your pants
shit (in) your pants
▪ I was so scared, I could've shit my pants.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And doesn't she look cheeky in those figure-hugging pants.
▪ He whacked his pants leg with the dowel.
▪ The tests scare the pants off many managers.
▪ The thrift men wear absurd combinations of checkered pants and checkered polyester jackets with wide lapels.
▪ Though, mind you, it scares the pants off poor old Crumwallis.
▪ Tony Rich, wearing a fleece-trimmed black jacket with black satin pants and a derby.
▪ When he opens his pants, they sigh.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
pants

pants \pants\ n.

  1. n. pl. A garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately.

    Syn: trousers.

  2. Underpants.

    Syn: drawers.

  3. Specifically: Underpants worn by women; panties.

    Syn: bloomers, drawers, panties.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
pants

trousers, 1840, see pantaloons. Colloquial singular pant is attested from 1893. To wear the pants "be the dominant member of a household" is first attested 193

  1. To do something by the seat of (one's) pants "by human instinct" is from 1942, originally of pilots, perhaps with some notion of being able to sense the condition and situation of the plane by engine vibrations, etc. To be caught with (one's) pants down "discovered in an embarrassing condition" is from 193

Wiktionary
pants

Etymology 1

  1. (context British slang English) of inferior quality, rubbish. n. (context plural only chiefly North America Australia New Zealand South Africa English) An outer garment worn by men and women that covers the body from the waist downwards, covering each leg separately, usually as far as the ankles; trousers. (from 19th c.) v

  2. To pull someone’s pants down; to forcibly remove someone’s pants. Etymology 2

    vb. (en-third-person singular of: pant)

WordNet
pants
  1. n. (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers" [syn: trousers]

  2. (usually in the plural) underpants worn by women; "she was afraid that her bloomers might have been showing" [syn: bloomers, drawers, knickers]

Wikipedia

Usage examples of "pants".

Her palms had sweated onto the cloth cover of the book and she set it aside, wiping her hands off on her pants, swearing in annoyance as she realized she was trembling.

There I was, with my pants unfastened and my anther in my hand, shaking it over a flower in a big pot.

He was almost glad the house was so dark because he felt ridiculous: sitting here in his blacked-out raid wear, Kevlar vest, and bloused BDU pants, surrounded by lace antimacassars, crochet work, and frilly doilies.

I recognized the little scholar with the shaggy gray beard, crocheted white cap, and drab shirt and pants who had come into the archive that morning.

She had her old beatnik costume on-the tight black pants, the bulky black sweater-and her hair was brushed and her lipstick was bright and straight.

The vendor was a short, middle-aged man in a light blue shirt and black beltless pants.

The folds of his belly hung over the beltless loops of the garish pants.

His beltless pants drooped off his hips, showing two inches of skin and three inches of black and yellow striped underwear below the tail of his shirt.

And he didn’t think that this morning they’d stop with just taking his backpack, or pantsing him, or figuring out some other way to humiliate him.