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Crossword clues for own

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
own
I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
achieve your own ends (=to get what you want, used to show disapproval)
▪ Some people would do almost anything to achieve their own ends.
acted on...own initiative (=he was not told what to do)
▪ Lt. Carlos was not obeying orders. He acted on his own initiative.
an own brandBritish English, a store brand American English (= sold by a particular store under its own name)
▪ A supermarket’s own brand should cost less than the nationally advertised brands.
an own goal (=when a player accidentally puts the ball into his/her own net)
▪ Dixon scored an unfortunate own goal against West Ham.
at your own expense (=used when saying that you pay for something yourself)
▪ He had copies of the book printed at his own expense.
at your own pace (=at the pace that suits you)
▪ This allows each child to learn at his or her own pace.
by...own admission
▪ Reese, by his own admission, lacks the necessary experience.
for your own benefit
▪ He used the money for his own benefit, instead of using it to help other people.
for your own safety
▪ He had been kept in custody for his own safety.
for...own good
▪ Take the medicine – it’s for your own good!
for...own sake (=because it will be good for him)
▪ I hope he’s told the truth for his own sake.
have your own transport
▪ The supermarket offers a free bus service for customers who do not have their own transport.
have/hold/own shares
▪ A lot of the employees own shares in the company.
have/own a business
▪ Nick owned a software business in Boston.
have/own a car
▪ Do you have a car?
her own
▪ She makes her own clothes.
his own
▪ Even his own mother would not have recognized him.
in sb’s own handwriting
▪ Entry forms must be in the candidate’s own handwriting.
its own
▪ The hotel has its own pool.
left to...own devices (=left alone and allowed to do whatever they wanted)
▪ Students were left to their own devices for long periods.
make...own mind up
▪ You’re old enough to make your own mind up about smoking.
my own boss (=I work for myself, rather than for an employer)
▪ Since I’m my own boss, my hours are flexible.
my own
▪ Even my own family wouldn’t believe me.
of my own
▪ an apartment of my own
our own
▪ We must each take responsibility for our own actions.
own a flat
▪ The couple own their own flat in Peebles.
own an apartment
▪ My parents own an apartment in Madrid.
own brand
▪ Tesco’s own brand tomato sauce
own fault
▪ I didn’t sleep well that night, but it was my own fault.
own goal
▪ The minister’s admission turned out to be a spectacular own goal.
own label
own mortality
▪ My mother’s death forced me to face the fact of my own mortality.
own special
▪ Each village has its own special charm.
own/have a farm
▪ The family owned a small farm in Suffolk.
roll...own (=make your own cigarettes)
▪ It’s cheaper to roll your own.
sb (of) your own age
▪ He needs to find people his own age.
sb’s own/home turf (=the place that someone comes from or lives in)
▪ We beat Canada on their home turf.
signing...own death warrants
▪ By indulging in casual sex, many teenagers could be signing their own death warrants.
take your own life (=kill yourself)
▪ He was depressed and decided to take his own life.
their own
▪ People had moved back into their own homes.
using...for...own ends
▪ Gerald had been using her for his own ends.
your own inimitable way/style etc
▪ He entertained us in his own inimitable style.
your own niche
▪ Everyone has their own niche within the sales team.
your own
▪ Be aware of your own feelings.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a life of its own
▪ He still wears a sailor suit, the cowlick at his hairline gives his forelock a life of its own.
▪ His hands windmill in a frenetic semaphore and his body shifts in ceaseless motion, with a life of its own.
▪ Its Studio Theatre has a life of its own at the forefront of creative theatre.
▪ Now the Vaccines for Children program has become a new bureaucratic monster with a life of its own.
▪ She watched it with mild curiosity; it seemed to have a life of its own.
▪ Tamriel is a self-sufficient world abuzz with a life of its own.
▪ The ball seemed to have acquired a life of its own.
▪ The Negro Plot took on a life of its own.
a man/woman etc after my own heart
afraid/frightened/scared etc of your own shadow
at your own risk
▪ Anyone who swims in this part of the river does it at their own risk.
▪ Danger - enter at your own risk.
▪ Journalists were allowed into the area, but only at their own risk.
▪ Visitors who park their cars in the corner lot do so at their own risk.
▪ Any such person relies upon the report at his own risk.
▪ But it's at your own risk.
▪ Follow their advice at your own risk.
▪ Parkers need to be clearly warned that they park their vehicles entirely at their own risk.
▪ Taste them at your own risk.
▪ The trespasser comes on to the premises at his own risk.
▪ There are also sanctioned nude beaches and unsanctioned beaches, where you go buff at your own risk.
▪ You could leave your bicycle at Dingle Station every day for a week for only 6d, at your own risk of course.
be hoist with/by your own petard
be master of your own fate/destiny
be minding your own business
▪ I was minding my own business, sleeping, when I heard something.
▪ It's a bit disconcerting to be minding your own business.
be of your own making
▪ He knew it was of his own making but that was not useful knowledge because he could not unmake it.
▪ Part of this is of his own making.
▪ The mink has had a chequered relationship with us, but we must remember that the changes are of our own making.
▪ The problems faced by the accountancy profession are of its own making.
▪ They frequently have to deal with awkward and unpleasant problems which may or may not be of their own making.
▪ Yet much of her frustration was of her own making and within herself.
be sb's (own) doing
▪ Nixon may blame others, but the scandal was his own doing.
▪ Am I really doing him a disservice if I leave it as one big C: drive?
▪ And however much men seem to be involved in the movie versions, women are the ones doing it.
▪ Claudia ... what the hell are you doing?
▪ If column 3 exceeds column 2, the Jones Enterprise would be better off doing something else with its resources.
▪ Sony and Disney are not doing this for charity.
▪ Then what on earth is she doing here?
▪ What is your country doing to prevent Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge returning to power?
▪ What was the Army doing there?
be your own man
▪ Do you want to be your own man and run your own business?
▪ At the same time, both here and in Hawksmoor, Ackroyd, too, is his own man.
▪ But Erlich was his own man.
▪ He turned out to be his own man, and a leader.
▪ He was his own man, after all.
▪ Major's first chance to show that he is his own man has been squandered on favours.
▪ Mobile I was my own man and played the way I believed because we lacked talent in certain areas.
▪ The latest reshuffle, immediately following victory, was supposed to confirm, once and for all, that Major was his own man.
▪ You can be your own man.
be your own master
▪ In an empire where no one was his own master except the Inca, was it socialism or a dictatorship which prevailed?
be your own woman
▪ But behind everything she did was a raw power that emphasised she was her own woman.
be your own worst enemy
▪ Many drivers are their own worst enemy -- driving too close, driving too fast, all the usual faults.
▪ My mother was her own worst enemy. She knew she was ill but she did nothing to help herself.
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
be/become a victim of its own success
▪ The helpline is a victim of its own success with so many people calling that no one can get through.
▪ Moreover, to a great extent the health service is a victim of its own success.
beat sb at their own game
blow your own horn
▪ Borland has plenty of reason to blow his own horn - his company has just shown record profits.
blow your own trumpet
▪ I don't want to blow my own trumpet, but it was me who came up with the idea for the project in the first place.
▪ But he could also blow his own trumpet like Satchmo on pay per note.
▪ Despite a unique record of achievement is recent years, he can never be accused of blowing his own trumpet.
▪ For too long we Christians have heard the modern world blowing its own trumpet.
▪ I don't like to blow my own trumpet but My Better Half could eat it to a band playing.
▪ Most were reluctant, defensive, or simply hesitant to blow their own trumpet.
buy/own sth outright
by sb's own account
▪ But, by his own account, he agreed he would speak to the Shah if they too would do so.
▪ Do the math: Some 2, 250 shows by his own account.
▪ This was the type of man he was looking for and, by his own account, not infrequently found.
▪ When he was young and full of the new learning of Oxford and Cambridge he appears arrogant even by his own account.
come into your own
▪ This season Brooks has really come into his own as a goal scorer.
▪ But I did learn things about people and eventually came into my own socially.
▪ By the 1970s, Cheatham was starting to come into his own as a soloist.
▪ Generally people start to come into their own in their second season.
▪ Now the guides' training in jungle warfare came into its own.
▪ Research expanded; neural net-work terminology came into its own.
▪ The Safrane's hatchback format comes into its own when large objects need to be transported.
▪ The thesis comes into its own with respect to industrial policy where significant discontinuities in policy can be attributed to the government changing hands.
▪ Viridian and phthalocyanine green come into their own when a particularly transparent mid green is required.
cut your own throat
▪ It would be silly to give up your job now -- you'd just be cutting your own throat.
▪ You would be cutting your own throat by refusing to accept their generous offer.
▪ To cut our own throats so thoroughly and so hopelessly would require colossal stupidity.
cut your own throat
▪ To cut our own throats so thoroughly and so hopelessly would require colossal stupidity.
dig your own grave
▪ By continuing to make racist comments before the committee, he really dug his own grave.
▪ I felt the sinking whir of the back wheel as it dug its own grave.
▪ I thought that before they shot you, they made you dig your own grave first.
▪ If he went against this young man sitting opposite him, he would in effect dig his own grave.
do sth of your own free will
▪ Bronson gave us his confession of his own free will.
▪ For all men serve him of their own free will.
▪ Her mouth opened of its own free will to his playfully probing tongue, welcoming the invader.
▪ I came back of my own free will on Friday, and went to the game yesterday.
▪ I say this of my own free will.
▪ She was placed in a safe house but later returned to the coven of her own free will.
▪ To some extent, adults can choose of their own free will whether to deal with their grief or not.
▪ Without any reason he left the Firm of his own free will and went to live in Brighton.
do sth off your own bat
▪ He had made the most ancient blunder in the business quite off his own bat.
▪ Instead, off her own bat, the girl went to see a solicitor in Newton Abbott, Devon.
do sth on your own responsibility
▪ I discussed the matter with John Montgomerie and on my own responsibility decided to telephone Harold Wilson to seek his advice.
do your own thing
▪ As a kid, I wanted to do my own thing, but when I got older I realized I wanted to continue the family business.
▪ He's given up his job and is living in northern California, just doing his own thing.
▪ He has a couple of roommates but they kind of all do their own thing.
▪ The three women worked together on a stage play, and then each went off to do her own thing.
▪ We don't talk much anymore - we're both too busy doing our own thing.
▪ But I do know the difficulty the Major has in getting away to do his own things.
▪ Do you prefer structure in your exercise or to do your own thing? 9.
▪ I just want to live my own life, go my own way, do my own thing with whom I choose.
▪ I mean like royalty do, pretend to be married but do their own thing on the quiet.
▪ Keyboard, mouse and joystick are supported, but every now and then the planes seem to do their own thing!
▪ Lawrence was of the latter kind: very bright; very competent, and wanted to do his own thing.
▪ She wanted to be free to do her own thing - be independent - get a job, perhaps.
▪ You get on and do your own thing, and respect others who do the same.
each to his/their own
▪ Fathers should customize each to their own particular needs and situation.
▪ It is a case of each to his own cell with no slopping out.
fight your own battles
▪ She has a talent for playing modern women who must find the inner strength to fight their own battles.
▪ Surely it is better for the townsfolk themselves to develop the necessary skills to fight their own battles?
▪ We invaded Ireland and fought our own battles there.
fight your own battles
▪ She has a talent for playing modern women who must find the inner strength to fight their own battles.
▪ Surely it is better for the townsfolk themselves to develop the necessary skills to fight their own battles?
▪ We invaded Ireland and fought our own battles there.
for its own sake
▪ Weber says he is interested in writing for its own sake - an uncommon attitude in Hollywood these days.
▪ Are you on the side of progress, or just plain old protest for its own sake?
▪ But Rothermere and Beaverbrook were not principally interested in the issue for its own sake.
▪ But Victor Amadeus seems to have had little interest in scholarship for its own sake.
▪ I can still aim at goodness for its own sake.
▪ Our mission is three-fold: To undertake basic research to advance knowledge for its own sake.
▪ Remember what Edward Abbey wrote about growth for its own sake.
▪ The content of education must therefore be that which men would wish to know for its own sake.
▪ This is an uneven show, driven by a concept that puts too much value on the different for its own sake.
get/have your (own) way
▪ Monica's so spoiled - she always gets her own way.
▪ Basilio still gets his way in the end because he marries his daughter to money.
▪ For two and a half years, the company can have its way.
▪ Our genes will take care of that, anyway, and it is natural to let them have their way.
▪ She mostly managed to get her own way with him.
▪ She remembered those days when they had played together as children, too, he always getting his own way.
▪ They both push you and have their own ways of motivating you.
▪ Under the genial exterior lay a considerable vanity, and a desire to have his own way.
▪ When some one or something stops them from getting their own way, their frustration can build up to explosion point.
give sb a dose/taste of their own medicine
go your own way
▪ After that if you want to be organised, you can be - or alternatively you can go your own way.
▪ But enough to allow you to go your own way.
▪ I want to go my own way, alone.
▪ If Cultural Studies goes its own way, what happens to what is left?
▪ Or, of course, you can go your own way.
▪ Speech goes its own way, and speakers drift farther than ever from a literary standard.
▪ The herd ad is intended to show that the company goes its own way in investing.
▪ The pairs of glassy eyes no longer corresponded, in death they broke ranks, each distended eye gone its own way.
have a mind of your own
▪ But Mansell has a mind of his own, and he was adamant he would make racing his career.
▪ Joey's only two, but he has a mind of his own.
▪ My hair seems to have a mind of its own today.
▪ She's a woman with a mind of her own, who says what she thinks.
▪ I have a mind of my own.
▪ They have minds of their own and will form their own views on what is put before them.
have it your (own) way
▪ But remember that this Last Best Place can disappear if corporate colonizers and their lackeys in Congress have it their way.
▪ Well, have it your own way.
have the courage of your (own) convictions
▪ Larry displayed the courage of his convictions by saying no to his supervisor.
hold your own (against sb)
▪ And he is bound to hold his own.
▪ Chaparral and forests resisted the invasion, and in some places they have held their own even against fire and development.
▪ He and his government colleagues were confident they could hold their own against the mujahedin.
▪ In many areas, Whigs clearly continued to hold their own amongst the squirearchy.
▪ Sharpe was holding his own sword low beside his stirrup, almost as if he could not be bothered to fight.
▪ Then, holding her own breath and moving stealthily on tiptoe, she began to ease her way towards the exit.
▪ Well and nobly did... his gallant troops hold their own....
▪ You hold your own life together.
in a world of your own/in your own little world
in sb's own backyard
▪ And as they were fretting about it being nicked, it turned up in their own backyard.
▪ It will be easier to find a soul mate elsewhere than in one's own backyard.
▪ Make it in your own backyard.
▪ Now those efforts can begin right in your own backyard, when the Gardens' devotees host their annual fall plant sale.
▪ Of course, every fly-blown congressman is keen to install fresh weapons of death in his own backyard.
▪ They have a big stockmarket in their own backyard.
in your own (good) time
▪ Before, they used to count their breaks in the twelve hours, now their breaks are in their own time.
▪ Blue Mooney, a living legend in his own time.
▪ He should take his own route in his own time and avoid the tendency to see through others' eyes.
▪ Let me tell them myself, in my own time.
▪ Nurses in training who work hard physically, study in their own time and have numerous personal commitments are under pressure.
▪ The recognition that exceptional holiness and spirituality continue to manifest themselves in our own time is also a central pentecostal conviction.
▪ There were realistic hopes for Surrey as Mark Butcher and Stewart appeared to be building a stand in their own time.
▪ You would be healthy in your own time.
in your own right
▪ Kahlo was the wife of painter Diego Rivera and an artist in her own right.
▪ After two years of challenging the power of governments, the movement has become a power in its own right.
▪ Both feature Hewlett's JetDirect interface for connection to local networks, which Hewlett-Packard will also market in its own right.
▪ Cold stores: Treat like small rooms in their own right using floor wall and ceiling techniques as appropriate.
▪ It is necessary to remind ourselves that involvement in the project constituted a significant staff-development exercise in its own right.
▪ Loyalty in the emerging business organization, which will be personal and communal, will be satisfying in its own right.
▪ MacKenzie is a powerful man in his own right.
▪ Not a word about how people should have related to me, as a person in my own right.
▪ Their lyrics stand up as poems, good light verse in their own right.
in your own time
▪ Before, they used to count their breaks in the twelve hours, now their breaks are in their own time.
▪ Best to ignore him and let him come around in his own time.
▪ I can remember doing that in my own time.
▪ Nurses in training who work hard physically, study in their own time and have numerous personal commitments are under pressure.
▪ The hunt will occur later, on its own terms and in its own time.
▪ Then gradually slip the open bag into the tank, and allow the fish to swim out in their own time.
▪ They can then absorb the literature in their own time and make up their own minds.
▪ Those designs are mine, done in my own time and made up by my own outworkers.
judge/consider etc sth on its (own) merits
keep your own counsel
▪ Even with those she loves most, Ginny tends to keep her own counsel.
▪ Amelia Earhart solved the problem her grandmother presented by keeping her own counsel.
▪ However, he may simply have been keeping his own counsel when talking to me out of a proper loyalty and caution.
▪ I keep my own counsel now, and my children are baffled by the new me.
▪ McLaren keeps his own counsel, being as reticent as Ferguson is gregarious.
▪ She is precisely the person to keep her own counsel for three hours.
▪ So, obediently she kept her own counsel.
▪ They were inscrutable, they kept their own counsel, and they were intelligent.
▪ To the end, he kept his own counsel.
know your own mind
▪ I'm in my mid-thirties and ought to know my own mind by now, but I'm scared of getting married.
▪ Though not yet 15, Sara knows her own mind, and has already decided on a career.
▪ All of which suggests a person who knows his own mind and makes his own decisions.
▪ He hardly knew his own mind, they said candidly among their own intimates.
▪ People often didn't know their own minds.
▪ Shirley giggled and said I was a woman who knew her own mind, wasn't I, Jim?
▪ You don't know your own mind.
line your own pockets
mind your own business
▪ I wish you'd stop interfering and mind your own business.
▪ Folks in Montana tend to value their privacy, to the point that minding your own business is considered a virtue.
▪ He also fired his lawyer and told civil libertarians to mind their own business.
▪ He had not minded his own business as a man of seventy in New York should do.
▪ His life had been well-ordered and reasonably happy, he thought, by minding his own business.
▪ I asked her if he'd returned home and she told me to mind my own business.
▪ I was minding my own business, sleeping, when I heard something.
▪ She hoped he didn't interpret them as telling him to mind his own business.
▪ Then I felt a fool and decided to leave it and mind my own business.
not know your own strength
of sb's/sth's own accord
▪ A cigarette between his girlish lips seemed to be emitting smoke of its own accord.
▪ A healthy man to put himself into a sickbed of his own accord.
▪ Almost of their own accord his hands shuffled the rest of the pack.
▪ Chloasma nearly always goes away of its own accord when the high levels of circulating hormones return to normal.
▪ Dealers who weren't going to make it left, often of their own accord, before getting sacked.
▪ Ongoing problems seem to arise of their own accord, and then to spread through the ranks with no ostensible cause.
▪ Optimists had hoped the answer was that opposition would ebb of its own accord as evidence of growth began.
▪ Will we leave peacefully of our own accord?
of your own volition
▪ Deena left the company of her own volition.
▪ But not of his own volition.
▪ Either you go down there of your own volition or I strangle you with my two bare hands.
▪ In the end Frank and I met of our own volition.
▪ Note that it is not possible to apply for a family assistance order; the court must act of its own volition.
▪ One gentleman has fled the country of his own volition, using yet another identity.
▪ The court does not, of its own volition, enquire into the merits of the case.
▪ There are tales of clanking chains and doors which open and close of their own volition.
▪ Very well; sometimes society changes for the good purely of its own volition.
on your own account
▪ Carrie decided to do a little research on her own account.
▪ Although his ministers were never permitted to decide matters on their own account, Victor Amadeus delegated wide administrative powers to them.
▪ But if the operators are set against discounting it will not prevent the agencies from doing some on their own account.
▪ He advanced large sums to Parliament and later invested heavily on his own account in the purchase of bishops' lands.
▪ He was going to miss old Mr Schofield and he was disappointed on his own account too.
▪ In 1862 Smith set up in business on his own account.
▪ The company imposed regulations on its members, but individuals still traded on their own account.
▪ They may not set up in practice on their own account for a further three years.
on your own head be it
paddle your own canoe
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
sb has their own life to lead
sb was (just) minding their own business
▪ I was just walking along, minding my own business, when this guy ran straight into me.
stand on your own (two) feet
▪ Able to stand on her own feet.
▪ I guess I shall have to learn to stand on my own feet.
▪ Out-and-out competitive in the world market standing on our own feet?
▪ She's very kind, but we ought to stand on our own feet.
▪ She, who'd always stood on her own feet, fought her own battles.
▪ Such beliefs are able to stand on their own feet, without support from others.
▪ Using the market price means that each division must stand on its own feet, as though it were an independent company.
strike out on your own
▪ It feels great to strike out on your own and find a job and a place to live.
▪ After problems in obtaining components, Comart struck out on its own, producing its Comart Communicator, a small business computer.
▪ And I was beginning to feel I wanted to strike out on my own.
▪ But she was right: it is time for him to strike out on his own.
▪ Glover was afraid Paul was going to strike out on his own with that suitcase, with that hat on his head.
▪ I found that I could quickly discard the handbook in favour of striking out on my own and was quite satisfied with the results.
▪ Or should I throw off all restraints and strike out on my own?
▪ So why not strike out on your own?
▪ The time was finally ripe, they decided, to strike out on their own.
take matters into your own hands
▪ The city council took matters into its own hands and set a date for the meeting.
▪ As a result, some countries have taken matters into their own hands.
▪ Finally the women of Buntong Tiga can stand it no longer - they take matters into their own hands.
▪ She then took matters into her own hands.
▪ She was more than capable of taking matters into her own hands.
▪ So why not take matters into our own hands?
▪ The last thing leaders want is Tutsi who survived the genocide taking matters into their own hands.
▪ When the psycho is caught, then let go on a technicality, Mom takes matters into her own hands.
take the law into your own hands
▪ Citizens should not be expected to take the law into their own hands.
through no fault of her/my etc own
▪ In my opinion Anna acted more childishly but through no fault of her own.
▪ So, through no fault of my own, I was at a loose end quite a bit.
under your own steam
▪ Can you manage to get up to the house under your own steam while I bring up the food?
▪ I never thought Sal and Thomas would make it here under their own steam!
▪ He left unexplained why, if that was his view, he had not gone under his own steam somewhat earlier.
▪ He would prefer an assistant who was prepared to be directed, not one who would dash away under their own steam.
▪ It now stands in North Road museum having last moved under its own steam in 1925.
▪ Otherwise, they'd be all over the place under their own steam.
▪ We need to know whether Paul got to the Cathedral under his own steam and at what time.
your own flesh and blood
▪ He raised those kids like they were his own flesh and blood.
your very own
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
jointly
▪ The land is jointly owned by both local clubs.
▪ A mutual fund is a portfolio of stocks or bonds that is jointly owned by a large number of investors.
▪ Fox has managing control of Fox / Liberty Sports and typically runs the ventures owned jointly.
▪ The plant, jointly owned by Maserati and Fiat, has built Innocentis since 1974.
▪ If the house is owned jointly the profit can be split for tax purposes.
privately
▪ Capital is privately owned by a minority, the capitalist class.
▪ Except during tours, the privately owned homes are not open to the public.
▪ Two further reasons have been given for the establishment of government-owned newspapers or for the taking over of existing privately owned ones.
▪ The villas themselves looked better than before, deserted except for the few that were privately owned and still habitable.
▪ Popular, privately owned century-old hotel, awash with oriental rugs, rich mahogany, walnut panelling and other Victoriana.
▪ As often as not, land reforms consist of turning large privately owned farms into state-or communally owned cooperatives.
▪ The privately owned land is a steep, rugged parcel of 171 acres near Highway 92.
publicly
▪ The agency should have powers of compulsory purchase and therefore the site of the town should be publicly owned.
▪ If anything, publicly owned utilities are cheaper.
▪ Tellingly, the publicly owned Tennessee Valley Authority is the only utility to have expressed interest recently in nuclear power.
▪ And what worked for a partnership proved disastrous in a publicly owned corporation.
▪ All five are to be incorporated as publicly owned companies from July 1, prior to the bidding process.
▪ For 100 years, publicly owned utilities have sold electricity at lower prices than their private counterparts.
▪ As it is publicly owned, this sector is subject to direct government influence and, frequently, political direction.
▪ Today, publicly owned cable television systems do the same.
wholly
▪ The Styrofoam plant is now wholly owned by Dow.
▪ In 1969, Lechmere merged with Dayton Corp., becoming a wholly owned subsidiary of the giant Minneapolis-based retailer.
▪ A wholly owned subsidiary is one in which the parent owns 100 percent of the voting stock of the subsidiary.
▪ Many wholly owned subsidiaries are originally founded by the parent for some special purpose.
▪ Monster Motorsports will remain a wholly owned subsidiary.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a life of its own
▪ He still wears a sailor suit, the cowlick at his hairline gives his forelock a life of its own.
▪ His hands windmill in a frenetic semaphore and his body shifts in ceaseless motion, with a life of its own.
▪ Its Studio Theatre has a life of its own at the forefront of creative theatre.
▪ Now the Vaccines for Children program has become a new bureaucratic monster with a life of its own.
▪ She watched it with mild curiosity; it seemed to have a life of its own.
▪ Tamriel is a self-sufficient world abuzz with a life of its own.
▪ The ball seemed to have acquired a life of its own.
▪ The Negro Plot took on a life of its own.
a man/woman etc after my own heart
afraid/frightened/scared etc of your own shadow
at your own risk
▪ Anyone who swims in this part of the river does it at their own risk.
▪ Danger - enter at your own risk.
▪ Journalists were allowed into the area, but only at their own risk.
▪ Visitors who park their cars in the corner lot do so at their own risk.
▪ Any such person relies upon the report at his own risk.
▪ But it's at your own risk.
▪ Follow their advice at your own risk.
▪ Parkers need to be clearly warned that they park their vehicles entirely at their own risk.
▪ Taste them at your own risk.
▪ The trespasser comes on to the premises at his own risk.
▪ There are also sanctioned nude beaches and unsanctioned beaches, where you go buff at your own risk.
▪ You could leave your bicycle at Dingle Station every day for a week for only 6d, at your own risk of course.
be master of your own fate/destiny
be of your own making
▪ He knew it was of his own making but that was not useful knowledge because he could not unmake it.
▪ Part of this is of his own making.
▪ The mink has had a chequered relationship with us, but we must remember that the changes are of our own making.
▪ The problems faced by the accountancy profession are of its own making.
▪ They frequently have to deal with awkward and unpleasant problems which may or may not be of their own making.
▪ Yet much of her frustration was of her own making and within herself.
be sb's (own) doing
▪ Nixon may blame others, but the scandal was his own doing.
▪ Am I really doing him a disservice if I leave it as one big C: drive?
▪ And however much men seem to be involved in the movie versions, women are the ones doing it.
▪ Claudia ... what the hell are you doing?
▪ If column 3 exceeds column 2, the Jones Enterprise would be better off doing something else with its resources.
▪ Sony and Disney are not doing this for charity.
▪ Then what on earth is she doing here?
▪ What is your country doing to prevent Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge returning to power?
▪ What was the Army doing there?
be your own man
▪ Do you want to be your own man and run your own business?
▪ At the same time, both here and in Hawksmoor, Ackroyd, too, is his own man.
▪ But Erlich was his own man.
▪ He turned out to be his own man, and a leader.
▪ He was his own man, after all.
▪ Major's first chance to show that he is his own man has been squandered on favours.
▪ Mobile I was my own man and played the way I believed because we lacked talent in certain areas.
▪ The latest reshuffle, immediately following victory, was supposed to confirm, once and for all, that Major was his own man.
▪ You can be your own man.
be your own master
▪ In an empire where no one was his own master except the Inca, was it socialism or a dictatorship which prevailed?
be your own woman
▪ But behind everything she did was a raw power that emphasised she was her own woman.
be your own worst enemy
▪ Many drivers are their own worst enemy -- driving too close, driving too fast, all the usual faults.
▪ My mother was her own worst enemy. She knew she was ill but she did nothing to help herself.
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
be your own worst enemy
▪ In other words, we are our own worst enemy.
▪ My father was his own worst enemy.
▪ People are their own worst enemies.
▪ Players can be real snobs about names, too, so they are their own worst enemies.
▪ To what extent would she say she was her own worst enemy?
▪ You could say that Gilly is her own worst enemy.
be/become a victim of its own success
▪ The helpline is a victim of its own success with so many people calling that no one can get through.
▪ Moreover, to a great extent the health service is a victim of its own success.
beat sb at their own game
buy/own sth outright
by sb's own account
▪ But, by his own account, he agreed he would speak to the Shah if they too would do so.
▪ Do the math: Some 2, 250 shows by his own account.
▪ This was the type of man he was looking for and, by his own account, not infrequently found.
▪ When he was young and full of the new learning of Oxford and Cambridge he appears arrogant even by his own account.
cut your own throat
▪ To cut our own throats so thoroughly and so hopelessly would require colossal stupidity.
do sth of your own free will
▪ Bronson gave us his confession of his own free will.
▪ For all men serve him of their own free will.
▪ Her mouth opened of its own free will to his playfully probing tongue, welcoming the invader.
▪ I came back of my own free will on Friday, and went to the game yesterday.
▪ I say this of my own free will.
▪ She was placed in a safe house but later returned to the coven of her own free will.
▪ To some extent, adults can choose of their own free will whether to deal with their grief or not.
▪ Without any reason he left the Firm of his own free will and went to live in Brighton.
do sth off your own bat
▪ He had made the most ancient blunder in the business quite off his own bat.
▪ Instead, off her own bat, the girl went to see a solicitor in Newton Abbott, Devon.
do sth on your own responsibility
▪ I discussed the matter with John Montgomerie and on my own responsibility decided to telephone Harold Wilson to seek his advice.
do your own thing
▪ As a kid, I wanted to do my own thing, but when I got older I realized I wanted to continue the family business.
▪ He's given up his job and is living in northern California, just doing his own thing.
▪ He has a couple of roommates but they kind of all do their own thing.
▪ The three women worked together on a stage play, and then each went off to do her own thing.
▪ We don't talk much anymore - we're both too busy doing our own thing.
▪ But I do know the difficulty the Major has in getting away to do his own things.
▪ Do you prefer structure in your exercise or to do your own thing? 9.
▪ I just want to live my own life, go my own way, do my own thing with whom I choose.
▪ I mean like royalty do, pretend to be married but do their own thing on the quiet.
▪ Keyboard, mouse and joystick are supported, but every now and then the planes seem to do their own thing!
▪ Lawrence was of the latter kind: very bright; very competent, and wanted to do his own thing.
▪ She wanted to be free to do her own thing - be independent - get a job, perhaps.
▪ You get on and do your own thing, and respect others who do the same.
each to his/their own
▪ Fathers should customize each to their own particular needs and situation.
▪ It is a case of each to his own cell with no slopping out.
fight your own battles
▪ She has a talent for playing modern women who must find the inner strength to fight their own battles.
▪ Surely it is better for the townsfolk themselves to develop the necessary skills to fight their own battles?
▪ We invaded Ireland and fought our own battles there.
for its own sake
▪ Weber says he is interested in writing for its own sake - an uncommon attitude in Hollywood these days.
▪ Are you on the side of progress, or just plain old protest for its own sake?
▪ But Rothermere and Beaverbrook were not principally interested in the issue for its own sake.
▪ But Victor Amadeus seems to have had little interest in scholarship for its own sake.
▪ I can still aim at goodness for its own sake.
▪ Our mission is three-fold: To undertake basic research to advance knowledge for its own sake.
▪ Remember what Edward Abbey wrote about growth for its own sake.
▪ The content of education must therefore be that which men would wish to know for its own sake.
▪ This is an uneven show, driven by a concept that puts too much value on the different for its own sake.
get/have your (own) way
▪ Monica's so spoiled - she always gets her own way.
▪ Basilio still gets his way in the end because he marries his daughter to money.
▪ For two and a half years, the company can have its way.
▪ Our genes will take care of that, anyway, and it is natural to let them have their way.
▪ She mostly managed to get her own way with him.
▪ She remembered those days when they had played together as children, too, he always getting his own way.
▪ They both push you and have their own ways of motivating you.
▪ Under the genial exterior lay a considerable vanity, and a desire to have his own way.
▪ When some one or something stops them from getting their own way, their frustration can build up to explosion point.
give sb a dose/taste of their own medicine
go your own way
▪ After that if you want to be organised, you can be - or alternatively you can go your own way.
▪ But enough to allow you to go your own way.
▪ I want to go my own way, alone.
▪ If Cultural Studies goes its own way, what happens to what is left?
▪ Or, of course, you can go your own way.
▪ Speech goes its own way, and speakers drift farther than ever from a literary standard.
▪ The herd ad is intended to show that the company goes its own way in investing.
▪ The pairs of glassy eyes no longer corresponded, in death they broke ranks, each distended eye gone its own way.
have a mind of your own
▪ But Mansell has a mind of his own, and he was adamant he would make racing his career.
▪ Joey's only two, but he has a mind of his own.
▪ My hair seems to have a mind of its own today.
▪ She's a woman with a mind of her own, who says what she thinks.
▪ I have a mind of my own.
▪ They have minds of their own and will form their own views on what is put before them.
have it your (own) way
▪ But remember that this Last Best Place can disappear if corporate colonizers and their lackeys in Congress have it their way.
▪ Well, have it your own way.
have the courage of your (own) convictions
▪ Larry displayed the courage of his convictions by saying no to his supervisor.
in a world of your own/in your own little world
in sb's own backyard
▪ And as they were fretting about it being nicked, it turned up in their own backyard.
▪ It will be easier to find a soul mate elsewhere than in one's own backyard.
▪ Make it in your own backyard.
▪ Now those efforts can begin right in your own backyard, when the Gardens' devotees host their annual fall plant sale.
▪ Of course, every fly-blown congressman is keen to install fresh weapons of death in his own backyard.
▪ They have a big stockmarket in their own backyard.
in your own (good) time
▪ Before, they used to count their breaks in the twelve hours, now their breaks are in their own time.
▪ Blue Mooney, a living legend in his own time.
▪ He should take his own route in his own time and avoid the tendency to see through others' eyes.
▪ Let me tell them myself, in my own time.
▪ Nurses in training who work hard physically, study in their own time and have numerous personal commitments are under pressure.
▪ The recognition that exceptional holiness and spirituality continue to manifest themselves in our own time is also a central pentecostal conviction.
▪ There were realistic hopes for Surrey as Mark Butcher and Stewart appeared to be building a stand in their own time.
▪ You would be healthy in your own time.
in your own good time
▪ He would do what had to be done in his own good time; she must leave him to it.
▪ Once the rabbit is dead it can be retrieved in your own good time.
▪ The problems are the normal ones of adolescence and will pass in their own good time.
▪ Tina had felt let down, but knowing Bobby, he would tell them in his own good time what had happened.
▪ Whatever Jack wanted to do or say he would do or say in his own good time.
in your own right
▪ Kahlo was the wife of painter Diego Rivera and an artist in her own right.
▪ After two years of challenging the power of governments, the movement has become a power in its own right.
▪ Both feature Hewlett's JetDirect interface for connection to local networks, which Hewlett-Packard will also market in its own right.
▪ Cold stores: Treat like small rooms in their own right using floor wall and ceiling techniques as appropriate.
▪ It is necessary to remind ourselves that involvement in the project constituted a significant staff-development exercise in its own right.
▪ Loyalty in the emerging business organization, which will be personal and communal, will be satisfying in its own right.
▪ MacKenzie is a powerful man in his own right.
▪ Not a word about how people should have related to me, as a person in my own right.
▪ Their lyrics stand up as poems, good light verse in their own right.
in your own sweet way/time
▪ Did he think he was so important that he could finish the cottage in his own sweet time?
▪ I'd rather carry on in my own sweet way, and I'd rather be in Stockholm.
▪ I probably love him, in my own sweet way.
▪ You can just sit back and read the responses and decide the winner in your own sweet time.
in your own time
▪ Before, they used to count their breaks in the twelve hours, now their breaks are in their own time.
▪ Best to ignore him and let him come around in his own time.
▪ I can remember doing that in my own time.
▪ Nurses in training who work hard physically, study in their own time and have numerous personal commitments are under pressure.
▪ The hunt will occur later, on its own terms and in its own time.
▪ Then gradually slip the open bag into the tank, and allow the fish to swim out in their own time.
▪ They can then absorb the literature in their own time and make up their own minds.
▪ Those designs are mine, done in my own time and made up by my own outworkers.
judge/consider etc sth on its (own) merits
keep your own counsel
▪ Even with those she loves most, Ginny tends to keep her own counsel.
▪ Amelia Earhart solved the problem her grandmother presented by keeping her own counsel.
▪ However, he may simply have been keeping his own counsel when talking to me out of a proper loyalty and caution.
▪ I keep my own counsel now, and my children are baffled by the new me.
▪ McLaren keeps his own counsel, being as reticent as Ferguson is gregarious.
▪ She is precisely the person to keep her own counsel for three hours.
▪ So, obediently she kept her own counsel.
▪ They were inscrutable, they kept their own counsel, and they were intelligent.
▪ To the end, he kept his own counsel.
not know your own strength
of sb's/sth's own accord
▪ A cigarette between his girlish lips seemed to be emitting smoke of its own accord.
▪ A healthy man to put himself into a sickbed of his own accord.
▪ Almost of their own accord his hands shuffled the rest of the pack.
▪ Chloasma nearly always goes away of its own accord when the high levels of circulating hormones return to normal.
▪ Dealers who weren't going to make it left, often of their own accord, before getting sacked.
▪ Ongoing problems seem to arise of their own accord, and then to spread through the ranks with no ostensible cause.
▪ Optimists had hoped the answer was that opposition would ebb of its own accord as evidence of growth began.
▪ Will we leave peacefully of our own accord?
of your own volition
▪ Deena left the company of her own volition.
▪ But not of his own volition.
▪ Either you go down there of your own volition or I strangle you with my two bare hands.
▪ In the end Frank and I met of our own volition.
▪ Note that it is not possible to apply for a family assistance order; the court must act of its own volition.
▪ One gentleman has fled the country of his own volition, using yet another identity.
▪ The court does not, of its own volition, enquire into the merits of the case.
▪ There are tales of clanking chains and doors which open and close of their own volition.
▪ Very well; sometimes society changes for the good purely of its own volition.
on your own account
▪ Carrie decided to do a little research on her own account.
▪ Although his ministers were never permitted to decide matters on their own account, Victor Amadeus delegated wide administrative powers to them.
▪ But if the operators are set against discounting it will not prevent the agencies from doing some on their own account.
▪ He advanced large sums to Parliament and later invested heavily on his own account in the purchase of bishops' lands.
▪ He was going to miss old Mr Schofield and he was disappointed on his own account too.
▪ In 1862 Smith set up in business on his own account.
▪ The company imposed regulations on its members, but individuals still traded on their own account.
▪ They may not set up in practice on their own account for a further three years.
on your own head be it
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
sb was (just) minding their own business
▪ I was just walking along, minding my own business, when this guy ran straight into me.
take matters into your own hands
▪ The city council took matters into its own hands and set a date for the meeting.
▪ As a result, some countries have taken matters into their own hands.
▪ Finally the women of Buntong Tiga can stand it no longer - they take matters into their own hands.
▪ She then took matters into her own hands.
▪ She was more than capable of taking matters into her own hands.
▪ So why not take matters into our own hands?
▪ The last thing leaders want is Tutsi who survived the genocide taking matters into their own hands.
▪ When the psycho is caught, then let go on a technicality, Mom takes matters into her own hands.
take the law into your own hands
▪ Citizens should not be expected to take the law into their own hands.
through no fault of her/my etc own
▪ In my opinion Anna acted more childishly but through no fault of her own.
▪ So, through no fault of my own, I was at a loose end quite a bit.
under your own steam
▪ Can you manage to get up to the house under your own steam while I bring up the food?
▪ I never thought Sal and Thomas would make it here under their own steam!
▪ He left unexplained why, if that was his view, he had not gone under his own steam somewhat earlier.
▪ He would prefer an assistant who was prepared to be directed, not one who would dash away under their own steam.
▪ It now stands in North Road museum having last moved under its own steam in 1925.
▪ Otherwise, they'd be all over the place under their own steam.
▪ We need to know whether Paul got to the Cathedral under his own steam and at what time.
with your own fair hands
your own flesh and blood
▪ He raised those kids like they were his own flesh and blood.
your very own
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ American newspapers in different cities are often owned by the same company.
▪ Andy and his wife own a vacation home near the beach.
▪ Clark owns about 40 companies in northern Europe.
▪ I don't even own a car.
▪ In National Parks, although the land is privately owned, there are strict controls on the use of the land.
▪ The company was previously owned by the French government.
▪ The horse is owned by a Saudi businessman.
▪ They own a small electronics company.
▪ They stayed in a villa once owned by the writer, Somerset Maugham.
▪ We don't own the apartment, we're just renting it.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Also, my uncle owns this ship!
▪ In fact, it was the ogre who owned the land that the king had just driven through.
▪ It is an actual spacecraft from the Soviet space shuttle program, owned and operated by former cosmonauts and space program employees.
▪ She was owned by Peter Phillips.
▪ Tasika Angus, owned by D. Judah.
▪ The property was purchased for investment purposes, and is still owned only because of the current property slump. 3.
▪ We don't own a picnic hamper.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Own

Own \Own\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Owned; p. pr. & vb. n. Owning.] [OE. ohnien, ahnien, AS. [=a]gnian, fr. [=a]gen own,

  1. See Own, a.] To hold as property; to have a legal or rightful title to; to be the proprietor or possessor of; to possess; as, to own a house.

Own

Own \Own\ ([=o]n), v. t. [OE. unnen to grant, permit, be pleased with, AS. unnan to grant; akin to OS. giunnan, G. g["o]nnen, Icel. unna; of uncertain origin. This word has been confused with own to possess.] To grant; to acknowledge; to admit to be true; to confess; to recognize in a particular character; as, we own that we have forfeited your love.

The wakeful bloodhound rose, and shook his hide; But his sagacious eye an inmate owns.
--Keats.

Own

Own \Own\, a. [OE. owen, awen, auen, aughen, AS. [=a]gen, p. p. of [=a]gan to possess; akin to OS. [=e]gan, G. & D. eigen, Icel. eiginn, Sw. & Dan. egen. [root]110. See Owe.] Belonging to; belonging exclusively or especially to; peculiar; -- most frequently following a possessive pronoun, as my, our, thy, your, his, her, its, their, in order to emphasize or intensify the idea of property, peculiar interest, or exclusive ownership; as, my own father; my own composition; my own idea; at my own price. ``No man was his own [i. e., no man was master of himself, or in possession of his senses].''
--Shak.

To hold one's own, to keep or maintain one's possessions; to yield nothing; esp., to suffer no loss or disadvantage in a contest.
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
own

Old English agen "one's own," literally "possessed by," from Proto-Germanic *aigana- "possessed, owned" (cognates: Old Saxon egan, Old Frisian egin, Old Norse eiginn, Dutch eigen, German eigen "own"), from past participle of PIE *aik- "to be master of, possess," source of Old English agan "to have" (see owe).

own

c.1200, ouen, "to possess, have; rule, be in command of, have authority over;" from Old English geagnian, from root agan "to have, to own" (see owe), and in part from the adjective own (q.v.). It became obsolete after c.1300, but was revived early 17c., in part as a back-formation of owner (mid-14c.), which continued. From c.1300 as "to acknowledge, admit as a fact," said especially of things to one's disadvantage. To own up "make full confession" is from 1853. Related: Owned; owning. \n\n

Wiktionary
own

Etymology 1 vb. 1 (lb en transitive) To have rightful possession of (property, goods or capital); "To possess by right; to have the right of property in; to have the legal right or rightful title to." (Ref 1) 2 (lb en transitive) To have recognized political sovereignty over a place, territory, as distinct from the ordinary connotation of property ownership. 3 (lb en intransitive) To admit, concede, grant, allow, acknowledge, confess; not to deny. 4 (lb en transitive) To claim as one's own; to answer to. 5 (lb en intransitive) To acknowledge or admit the possession or ownership of. (Ref 3) 6 (lb en transitive) To defeat or embarrass; to overwhelm. 7 (lb en transitive) To virtually or figuratively enslave. 8 (lb en gaming slang) To defeat, dominate, or be above, also spelled (m en pwn). 9 (lb en transitive computing slang) To illicitly obtain "super-user" or "root" access into a computer system thereby having access to all of the user files on that system; pwn. Etymology 2

  1. belong to; possessed; proper to. alt. belong to; possessed; proper to. Etymology 3

    v

  2. 1 (context transitive obsolete English) To grant; give. 2 (context transitive English) To admit; concede; acknowledge. 3 (context transitive English) To recognise; acknowledge. 4 (context intransitive UK dialectal English) To confess.

WordNet
own

adj. belonging to or on behalf of a specified person (especially yourself); preceded by a possessive; "for your own use"; "do your own thing"; "she makes her own clothes"; "`ain' is Scottish" [syn: own(a), ain]

own

v. have ownership or possession of; "He owns three houses in Florida"; "How many cars does she have?" [syn: have, possess]

Wikipedia
OWN

OWN may refer to:

  • Old West Norse, a North Germanic language
  • Once Was Not (2005), an album by Cryptopsy
  • One Warrior Nation: what The Ultimate Warrior calls his fans
  • OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, a U.S.-based cable and satellite television channel

:*OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network (Canada), a Canadian cable and satellite television channel

Usage examples of "own".

Q Factor, though high, is not of any such extraordinary highness as to justify an attempt at psychosurgery to correct the aberration, it is therefore recommended that subject be released from the Communipath Creche on her own recognizance after suitable indoctrination erasure.

Even the Templars and the Hospitallers were divided, and the Italian merchant princes abetted one faction or the other as their own interests decreed.

We may, however, omit for the present any consideration of the particular providence, that beforehand decision which accomplishes or holds things in abeyance to some good purpose and gives or withholds in our own regard: when we have established the Universal Providence which we affirm, we can link the secondary with it.

But, as it was, he ably supported the exposed flank that Johnston so skillfully attacked, won the battle, inflicted losses a good deal larger than his own, and gained his ulterior objective as well as if there had not been a fight at all.

The chest claimed to be that of Elder Brewster, owned by the Connecticut Historical Society, was not improb ably his, but that it had any MAY-FLOWER relation is not shown.

In a second she was giving her own breakfast to Abo, who neither thanked her or acknowledged her presence.

His greatest problem was the sheer quantity of specie he now had aboard his own ship.

I mean, our own government had terrible policies for Aboriginal people.

The other two aborigines, their luminous eyes aglow, drew their own axes from the back-sheaths and slipped away.

Chrissie, took both her hands and held them gently in his, as aware of her abraded palm as he was aware of his own injured wrist.

Coarse dorneck linen abraded her own fingers as she twisted them into the folds of her apron.

Except for the annoyance of the bombs, the gunners of the forts had it much their own way until the broadsides of the Pensacola, which showed eleven heavy guns on either side, drew up abreast of them.

The laws which excuse, on any occasions, the ignorance of their subjects, confess their own imperfections: the civil jurisprudence, as it was abridged by Justinian, still continued a mysterious science, and a profitable trade, and the innate perplexity of the study was involved in tenfold darkness by the private industry of the practitioners.

Up till now, to his own surprise, all three of his fellow absconders had acted as if he were still one of them, in equal peril from outsiders-or settlers, like the Meldrums-and therefore bent, as they were, on escape.

Matter, then, thus brought to order must lose its own nature in the supreme degree unless its baseness is an accidental: if it is base in the sense of being Baseness the Absolute, it could never participate in order, and, if evil in the sense of being Evil the Absolute, it could never participate in good.