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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mop
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a mass/mop of curls (=a lot of curls)
▪ a gorgeous Italian man with a mass of dark curls
a mop of hair (=a large amount of thick untidy hair)
▪ He had an unruly mop of brown hair.
mop/wipe your brow (=dry your brow with your hand or a cloth because you are hot or nervous)
wash/mop the floor
▪ The floor needs mopping.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All the spawning mops were removed and I hoped to see a shoal of young Cardinal Tetras.
▪ As he left his room, he noticed a mop and bucket sitting in a corner in the hallway.
▪ As Robert watched, Aziz raised his mop and started a kind of semaphore in the direction of the Windmill.
▪ Daily inspections of the tank will indicate a few fry hanging on the tank sides and others hiding in the mops.
▪ He was still carrying his mop and broom and wearing his brown overalls.
▪ I saw a guy with a head the size of a bucket-the kind you put mops in.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
up
▪ A second equally good story describes mopping up an oil spill at sea.
▪ After the worst of it was mopped up, lunch continued.
▪ It went down well, with dry bread to mop up the water.
▪ Unfortunately, the weapon mopping up after the Cold War is very lethal, costs a few hundred bucks and is everywhere.
▪ Staff were mopping up today as Mr Alton held his usual surgery.
▪ A janitor mopped up the gore and it all got thrown away or was buried somewhere.
▪ Anyway, the people who disposed of her body mopped up some blood, and squeezed it out on to the garments.
▪ Fire crews were mopping up early Tuesday.
■ NOUN
brow
▪ She sat on the bed, mopping his brow.
▪ Once Chuck turned and grinned delightedly at her as he paused to mop his brow, and she smiled warmly back.
▪ He sighed and mopped his brow.
▪ She stood up, mopping her brow with the back of a skeleton wrist.
▪ The Archdeacon, to Theodora's amusement, mopped his brow.
▪ The Prince mopped his brow, his hands sweaty inside his gloves, as he faced the bowling for the new over.
▪ Damien mopped his brow, but decided not to remove his jacket, as he was wearing braces.
face
▪ In the hall Kruger took out his handkerchief and mopped his perspiring face.
▪ He mopped his face with it.
▪ Georgiades came back mopping his face.
▪ The rector turned and looked out the window behind his desk, and mopped his rain-soaked face and hands with a handkerchief.
▪ I smiled, mopped my face, and sat on a rock to toast myself with two pints of chlorinated water.
▪ Roy stops mopping her face with a towel and looks up at Jody.
floor
▪ Matthew made them mop the floor and Rory hadn't minded.
▪ She came home from work in the hospital pharmacy to find him doing the laundry or mopping the floor.
▪ One was mopping the floor, another dispensing pills.
▪ Barnabas sat down at once and gazed at him, mopping the garage floor with his tail.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A trainer mopped Norwood's face with a towel.
▪ Dan has to mop the floor of the café every night.
▪ I just mopped the kitchen floor.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A second equally good story describes mopping up an oil spill at sea.
▪ Barnabas sat down at once and gazed at him, mopping the garage floor with his tail.
▪ He mopped at his chin, his attention turned inward.
▪ Run For Free led the charge in the £35,000 stamina test, and the Pipe supporting cast mopped up the minor prizes.
▪ She sat on the bed, mopping his brow.
▪ Staff were mopping up today as Mr Alton held his usual surgery.
▪ The every so often it was mopped, the every so often sprayed.
▪ Unfortunately, the weapon mopping up after the Cold War is very lethal, costs a few hundred bucks and is everywhere.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mop

Mop \Mop\, n. [CF. W. mop, mopa, Ir. moipal, Gael. moibeal, moibean; or OF. mappe a napkin (see Map, Napkin).]

  1. An implement for washing floors, or the like, made of a piece of cloth, or a collection of thrums, or coarse yarn, fastened to a handle.

  2. A fair where servants are hired. [Prov. Eng.]

  3. The young of any animal; also, a young girl; a moppet. [Prov. Eng.] --Halliwell. Mop head.

    1. The end of a mop, to which the thrums or rags are fastened.

    2. A clamp for holding the thrums or rags of a mop.

Mop

Mop \Mop\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Mopped; p. pr. & vb. n. Mopping.] To rub or wipe with a mop, or as with a mop; as, to mop a floor; to mop one's face with a handkerchief.

Mop

Mop \Mop\, n. [See Mope.] A made-up face; a grimace. ``What mops and mowes it makes!''
--Beau. & Fl.

Mop

Mop \Mop\, v. i. To make a wry mouth. [Obs.]
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
mop

late 15c., mappe "bundle of yarn, etc., fastened to the end of a stick for cleaning or spreading pitch on a ship's decks," from Walloon (French) mappe "napkin," from Latin mappa "napkin" (see map (n.)). Modern spelling by 1660s. Of hair, from 1847. Grose ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," Grose, 1788] has mopsqueezer "A maid servant, particularly a housemaid."

mop

1709, from mop (n.). Related: Mopped; mopping.

Wiktionary
mop

n. 1 An implement for washing floors, or the like, made of a piece of cloth, or a collection of thrums, or coarse yarn, fastened to a handle. 2 (context humorous English) A dense head of hair. 3 (context British dialect English) A fair where servants are hired. 4 (context British dialect English) The young of any animal; also, a young girl; a moppet. 5 A made-up face; a grimace. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To rub, scrub, clean or wipe with a mop, or as if with a mop. 2 (context intransitive English) To make a wry expression with the mouth.

WordNet
mop
  1. v. to wash or wipe with or as if with a mop; "Mop the hallway now"; "He mopped her forehead with a towel" [syn: wipe up, mop up]

  2. make a sad face and thrust out one's lower lip; "mop and mow"; "The girl pouted" [syn: pout, mow]

  3. [also: mopping, mopped]

mop
  1. n. cleaning implement consisting of absorbent material fastened to a handle; for cleaning floors [syn: swab, swob]

  2. [also: mopping, mopped]

Wikipedia
Mop

A mop (such as a floor mop) is a mass or bundle of coarse strings or yarn, etc., or a piece of cloth, sponge, or other absorbent material, attached to a pole or stick. It is used to soak up liquid, for cleaning floors and other surfaces, to mop up dust, or for other cleaning purposes. The word (then spelled mappe) is attested in English as early as 1496, but new refinements and variations of mop designs have been introduced, from time to time. For example, American inventor Jacob Howe received U.S. patent #241 for a mop holder in 1837 and Thomas W. Stewart (U.S. patent #499,402) in 1893.

MOP (electrical safety)

Means Of Protection, or MOP, is a concept introduced in the standard for medical electrical equipment IEC 60601-1. The concept is that no one means of protection should be totally necessary to the device's safety, so that the failure of one should not make the device immediately dangerous.

MOP is further divided into MOOP and MOPP.

Usage examples of "mop".

King looked on apathetically while his seconds mopped the streaming water from him, dried his face, and prepared him to leave the ring.

With the bandanna, she mopped away the specks of sweat under her eyes.

He had watched Joe mop up the dayroom with Benet for playing fast and loose with safety rules while working a hotstick job, and it put Benet in sick bay for three days.

A few moments later, as the crowd held its aching sides and mopped its eyes, Samson the Strong Man hauled prone, soaked, semi-conscious, fearfully hallucinating Buffo off up the gangway that led to the foyer as little children gave him one last tittering poke for luck before he vanished as from the face of the earth, while the clowns ran round and round the tiers of seats, kissing babies, distributing bonbons and laughing, laughing, laughing to hide their broken hearts.

The bureaucrat went back in for his briefcase, took out a handkerchief and mopped his brow.

After a few more minutes of unsuccessfully trying not to think of what lay in store for a celibate nun in a meat show, I trudged over to the Man of Many Colors, who was lying very still on one of the cots, while the Human Lizard and the India Rubber Man took turns rubbing his wrists vigorously and mopping sweat from his forehead.

Fergus continued eating until his plate was clean, mopped with ciabatta from the bread basket.

The column moved swiftly forward to cut the enemy into disorganized fragments for the following Covenanter infantry to mop up.

Cybil flicked a glance up, watching Jody, with her expressive brown eyes and mop of dusky-blond hair, energetically pace around the studio.

One of them, an elderly gent with a mop of untidy white hair, was ahead of the other two.

Dumping grounds for the uneducated hoi polloi, the jobless peasants, the Asians, the blacks, the Dominicans, the fodder that keeps our opulent society humming, the little people who kill the chickens and disembowel the cattle and pick the cotton and work in the sweatshops and wash the dishes, scrub the toilets, mop floors, and buy all the cigarettes.

While imbibing, he found several of the top sergeants of the tanker battalion and promised them invitations to a jungle juice party in order to ensure there would be no hassle with getting the drivers Junkman and Mop recruited in to sick call the next morning.

Dorel could do nothing but tow her along like a gray dust mop over the garden trail as Katana towed her.

Denisov, flushed after the mazurka and mopping himself with his handkerchief, sat down by Natasha and did not leave her for the rest of the evening.

Caine quickly mopped the co ners of his mouth, and then surreptitiously swiped the napkin ovt the cold sweat that had moistened his forehead.