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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
lip
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cry escapes sb/sb’s lips
▪ A cry escaped her lips as he tightened his grip on her wrist.
bite your lip (=because you are upset or not sure what to say)
▪ She paused uncertainly, biting her lip.
chew your lip/nails
cleft lip
have a smile on your face/lips
▪ They all had broad smiles on their faces.
keep a stiff upper lip
▪ Men were taught to keep a stiff upper lip.
lip balm
lip gloss
lip salve
lip service
▪ organizations that pay lip service to career development
lips pouted
▪ Her full lips pouted slightly.
moistened...lips (=made her lips wet with her tongue)
▪ She moistened her lips .
sb’s bottom lip
▪ Her bottom lip trembled and she started to cry.
split...lip
▪ She fell against a table and split her lip.
thin arms/legs/lips etc
▪ He has long thin hands.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
bottom
▪ Her teeth sank into her bottom lip, biting back a cry, and she winced.
▪ The bottom lip fattens and pushes out beyond the lower lip.
▪ His teeth closed lightly on her bottom lip.
▪ Her bottom lip is fat and purple and there's a split down the middle.
▪ Kate chewed on her bottom lip.
▪ She drew in her breath sharply and bit down hard on her bottom lip in an effort not to cry out.
▪ The bottom lip protrudes in sullen, worried anticipation.
▪ She looked up at him expectantly, her mouth open, the bottom lip raised, almost brutal in what it implied.
dry
▪ She licked her very dry lips and refused to succumb to the temptation of another drink.
▪ I would calm my rage, moisten my dry lips, force his return if only by the strength of my desire.
▪ He looked up one last time at the grey edifice, licking dry lips.
▪ I am growing weak, oh so weak; my tongue is dry, my lips are parched.
▪ His narrow tongue flicked once across each dry lip.
▪ His tongue flicked nervously across dry lips as he prepared to open the lid.
▪ Use the tiniest amount of a matt, dry lip pencil - it lasts longer than lipstick and it won't run.
▪ Vi pulled a dry tongue around dry lips.
full
▪ And then a smile, full lips curling, eyes sparkling.
▪ For had not Caswell been beautiful - his full, sensuous lips, whispering honeyed words.
▪ At the same time, his full lower lip projected in a way that warned you to be careful.
▪ He looked at her wide mouth, the full lips that kissed him so often and so lusciously.
▪ How soft the cheeks, how shining the eyes, how full the lips!
▪ She wore no make-up but had classic features, a straight nose, full lips and fine eyes.
▪ Kate read the expression in his eyes and parted her full lips to speak.
low
▪ He extended his lower lip and exhaled.
▪ He nervously bites his lower lip and slowly shakes his head.
▪ Her mouth was full, and a half-moon of light accentuated the lustrous curve of her lower lip.
▪ His lower jaw, lips and nose had been infested with open sores and scabs, much of the flesh eaten away.
▪ There are no teeth, no long, lower-jaw, no huge lower lip and hardly any tongue.
▪ Chewing on her lower lip, she trundled after him along a flagged passageway and up an ornate wooden staircase.
▪ Her cheeks are flushed the fluorescent melon orange that also glimmers on her lower lip.
parted
▪ His own eyes gazed down at her, watching the tip of her tongue pass unconsciously over her parted lips.
▪ Cheryl ran the tip of her tongue round her parted lips.
▪ He was still looking into her eyes and his mouth found her parted lips.
▪ He had to get closer, had to touch the statue, had to touch those parted lips.
▪ She stirred and snuggled towards him, a low murmur of peace escaping from slightly parted lips.
▪ Fifty or sixty perfect, pointed teeth gleamed between his parted lips.
▪ He kept his head turned towards Mary, though, as between parted lips they licked the tips of each other's tongues.
red
▪ Only his bright red lips and large blue eyes stood out from the general blackness.
▪ Her cheeks were paler, her teeth more regular, and her red lips thinner than most country girls'.
▪ Then she opens her pretty red lips and smiles with pretty white teeth.
▪ Sylvie sidling, smiling with red lips.
▪ Orlane and Clinique also favour red for lips and versatile, fleshy tones for eyes.
▪ She smiles out of plump, red lips.
▪ Their faces, stylised with oval, almond eyes and red lips, were disconcerting.
stiff
▪ Paul didn't keep a stiff upper lip because that was the way that he thought that Christians should behave.
▪ Oh, hello, guys; stiff lip, stiff lip....
▪ All he could produce was a stiff upper lip, while young Lady C cast meaningful looks at sturdy gamekeeper Mellors.
▪ The stiff upper lip is a barrier against the trembling which could lead to tears.
▪ Election losers, for instance, are traditionally expected to keep a stiff upper lip and not let their disappointment show.
▪ So please, leave the stiff upper lip to one side, at home at least.
▪ The Ulster Unionist security spokesman maintained a stiff upper lip as he had his moustache shaved off - for charity.
thin
▪ Paler, shiny colours help thin lips look more full.
▪ The shell of a young, actively growing Nucella has a thin sharp lip.
▪ His dark skin glistens, his slanted eyes above his high cheekbones are cruel, his thin lips are determined.
▪ She has a narrow face, deep-set eyes, sharp nose and thin lips.
▪ His spare middle-aged frame is topped by a large head with sallow cheeks, thin lips, and receding chin.
▪ A martyr of tolerance, I think she would like not to just purse her thin prim lips.
▪ They were humanoids: short, Caucasian but hairless, with thin lips and bulging black eyes.
top
▪ The area between his gashed top lip and his nose was heavily bruised.
▪ Her breath came in puffs, ruffling her top lip.
▪ It is as thick as baby food and leaves a soft sediment on his top lip.
▪ She heard teeth shatter under the impact, saw one of them driven through his top lip.
▪ He slammed the straight edge into his opponent's face, taking him between top lip and nostrils.
▪ A sheen of sweat had appeared above Paulie's top lip.
▪ But he rubbed his forefinger guiltily against his top lip while he pondered the implications of a new insight.
upper
▪ Paul didn't keep a stiff upper lip because that was the way that he thought that Christians should behave.
▪ He pressed a large white mustache on to his upper lip.
▪ With hands in sleeves, the old man looked extremely Oriental, long moustaches curving down from the upper lip.
▪ This time the thumb was in the mouth while the index finger was placed between the gums and the upper lip.
▪ She was drinking her tea, making a comfortable watery chirrup as her long upper lip drew the tea into her mouth.
▪ The upper lip was steep and prominent.
▪ Sweat filmed his forehead and beaded his upper lip.
▪ Her long upper lip is drawn down taut.
■ NOUN
service
▪ Politicians pay lip service to crime.
▪ That they were now even giving lip service to these ideas is significant.
▪ The hon. Gentleman should be ashamed of the lip service that he has paid to employment by continuing to outline such policies.
▪ It pays lip service to local choices but provides no specific means to make them more rational and efficient.
▪ This is in spite of the lip service paid to the proud independence of the States.
▪ Little has really changed despite lip service paid to the democratic process.
▪ Unfortunately, the system is such that we often pay only lip service to this very important area.
▪ It has been a problem, despite all the lip service given it over the years.
■ VERB
bite
▪ He nervously bites his lower lip and slowly shakes his head.
▪ Billy Bibbit shivered in the cold and bit his lip.
▪ She bit her lip over the length, but there was little she could do about it.
▪ I flushed and bit my lip.
▪ She bit her lip, weighing up in her confused mind where to run.
▪ She bit her lip, caught between natural caution and an untypical desire to live dangerously.
▪ He groaned a little and Eline bit her lip seeing the pain etched on his face.
▪ He bit his lip, clenching his fists.
chew
▪ Emily chewed her lip, thinking about Hari and Craig.
▪ He chewed his lower lip in a grudging silence.
▪ Still trying to pull herself together, Merrill chewed her inner lip crossly.
▪ Walter flew out the door; leaving Gordy and Ivan chewing their lips and wringing their hands.
▪ Janine chewed her lip, staring spitefully at her child.
▪ Kate chewed on her bottom lip.
▪ Prince William, 10, chewed his lip anxiously while eight-year-old Harry stared wistfully ahead, dreaming of Christmases past.
curl
▪ The latter was aptly named, so tart that the first gulp curled your lips back.
▪ He wanted to curl lip in the doorway, for the night.
▪ Amber was forced to notice him, but instead of apologising, she curled her lips into an ugly snarl.
▪ But at that time, biologists also saw sick, disoriented manatees acting strangely by curling their lips and arching their backs.
▪ Had I been allowed to puddle around on my own, people today might curl their lips at Faldo's approach.
▪ A self-satisfied smile curled over her lips.
▪ The sea, rather than dipping to the horizon, curled up like the lip of a dish.
▪ A cucumber sandwich is curling its lip.
kiss
▪ No kissing on the lips, no exchanging hotel room numbers.
▪ Gently, he brought his face down on to Joe's and kissed him on his lips.
▪ I said, bending over and kissing him on the lips.
▪ At the moment the two sides joined, they kissed like lips.
lick
▪ A rare, special smell that should have had her licking her lips and counting the hours until lunch.
▪ I cleared my throat, licked my lips.
▪ He looked up one last time at the grey edifice, licking dry lips.
▪ He licked his lips and looked at my laughing mouth.
▪ They lounge round my chair now, staring at the chaplain and licking their lips.
▪ Digby could almost hear the commentators licking their lips.
▪ Duvall licked his lips, looked at Cardiff ... and pulled open the door.
moisten
▪ She moistened her lips with the tip of her tongue and his sudden tension told her she was right.
▪ I would calm my rage, moisten my dry lips, force his return if only by the strength of my desire.
▪ She moistened her lips, feeling the raised and tender flesh where her teeth had bitten through.
▪ If he or she has difficulty in speaking, moistening the tongue and lips can be helpful.
▪ She didn't feel him bathe her forehead or moisten her lips from time to time.
▪ Swallowing, she moistened her lips.
▪ His mouth closed to moisten suddenly dry lips.
move
▪ Madeleine started adding up again, nodding her head as her eyes strayed down the page, moving her lips.
▪ Those of you who move your lips when you read may take a 30-second break to rest your facial muscles.
▪ He just moved his lips as he stared out there.
▪ It means, young man, that you will have to move your lips.
▪ Only as the men left did he relax sufficiently to give Constance a glance of bitter complicity and move his lips soundlessly.
▪ The figures on the screen seemed to be shaking with the ague and they moved their lips like mutes.
▪ Nicola moved her lips along Richard's neck and nuzzled his ear lobe delicately.
▪ Black teeth and black tongue moving, black lips quite near, saying over and over, My name is Kip.
part
▪ His mouth found hers, and she parted her lips in response.
▪ On her parted lips a mysterious, an unspeakable question trembled.
▪ He lay back and she stretched her body over his, leaning to his mouth and parting his lips with her tongue.
▪ The wart crept out between his parted lips.
▪ She then parted Charlie's lips expertly before her tongue began to play with his.
▪ His tongue parted her lips sensuously and then he drew so hard on her mouth that her last vestige of hope disappeared.
▪ She parted her lips for him as his mouth closed over hers once again and refused to consider where for ever might end.
▪ Kate read the expression in his eyes and parted her full lips to speak.
pass
▪ When it does, I promise not a drop will pass my lips before dinner.
▪ Oh, there were times when a few drops of liquid refreshment passed their lips.
▪ Though one would think not a morsel had passed her lips for months.
▪ As the words passed their lips they became trees, but still they were together.
pay
▪ Society pays noisy lip service to monogamy but, in reality, encourages affairs.
▪ It pays lip service to local choices but provides no specific means to make them more rational and efficient.
▪ Local authorities are expected to pay more than lip service to this requirement.
▪ Most politicians have only paid them lip service, they complain.
▪ Unfortunately, the system is such that we often pay only lip service to this very important area.
▪ The conventional methodology tends to pay lip service to user involvement.
▪ Though everybody pays lip service to performance, politics is often the ultimate arbiter of their fate.
▪ They pay lip service to equality but they don't want to have to do anything committed about it.
play
▪ She found the make-up room and went in, a faint smile playing about her lips as she looked round.
▪ A smile played again about her lips.
▪ He leaned back in the chair, a slight smile playing on his lips.
▪ The smile that had played on his lips throughout the game was gone.
▪ Only Brenna let a twisted smile play around her lips as the verdicts were announced.
▪ She checked her reflection, a tiny smile playing about her lips.
▪ That's the flneur, caught in the spotlight, blushing perhaps but with a wry smile playing around his lips.
▪ But at last she looked up at him, a soft contented smile playing about her lips.
press
▪ But she pressed her lips tightly together and rode steadily on.
▪ What holds him back from pressing his lips upon those lips with brown lipstick?
▪ She shivered and pressed her lips against his skin.
▪ She rolled over on top of him pressing her lips against his, her tongue teasing, her hand rocking him.
▪ Bob Southwell only pressed his lips together and didn't say anything.
▪ He drew her towards him, in play, and pressed his lips on her lips.
▪ Slowly Ruth ran her hand across his chest and pressed her lips to his flesh once again.
purse
▪ She pursed her lips and blew on the baby's squashed, immobile face.
▪ As he read he pursed his lips.
▪ She pursed her lips and rubbed a hand over her thick brown hair.
▪ The baby may continue to move, sometimes smiling, frowning, or pursing the lips.
▪ And Goldberg, pursing his lips in concentration, flicking the hair out of his eyes, typed furiously on.
▪ He squinted, pursing his lips.
▪ Kinnear picked up his cards and pursed his lips and sucked in his breath and looked at his hand.
▪ I pursed my lips and shook my head.
read
▪ The Budget also marked a head-on collision between Conservative Party election promises and the real world, however. Read their lips.
▪ They have to read her lips.
▪ There was a boy at school who was deaf, but he could read lips so we didn't have to shout.
▪ As he read he pursed his lips.
▪ When he uttered his infamous words' Read my lips.
▪ The men gathered around the window, looking in, trying to read lips.
▪ But this kind of charm must not deflect us from what de Man is saying. Read his lips.
▪ At 12, she taught herself to read lips.
smack
▪ The chimpanzee then pulls out the grass stem and picks off the termites with its teeth, smacking its lips with pleasure.
▪ She begins cackling, smacking her lips, like a child thinking of a turkey dinner.
▪ Granny Weatherwax smacked her lips, like some one emerging from a very deep sleep.
▪ The woman seemed to be smacking her lips over every word.
▪ He smacked his lips and stroked his moustache with surprise.
▪ Shove his face into his own shit, they were learning, and he will devour it, smacking his lips.
▪ Cranston snored gently like a child, muttering now and again and smacking his lips.
▪ The young one smacked his lips.
smile
▪ She looked at Graham, not smiling, then her lips trembled and a small smile did appear.
▪ There is little emotion in her eyes, no smile on her lips.
▪ Sylvie sidling, smiling with red lips.
▪ But he smiled with his lips, as usual, giving no clue to change.
▪ That Katherine smiled with her lips open.
touch
▪ And it was no wonder that she hadn't touched his lips with hers.
▪ During these efforts, her fleshy nose could touch her lips.
▪ A bitter smile touched his lips at that, for hadn't Grainne long since been lost?
▪ He tasted warm wetness on his tongue and touched his lip and took away a bloodied finger.
▪ Disappointment! dash not from my trembling hand the bowl which almost touches my lips.
▪ The pink tip of a tongue touched her pale lips.
▪ Boris touched his lips then looked at the smear of blood on his hand.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a fat lip
bring a smile to sb's lips/face
▪ He and Stapleton can associate to their hearts' content and that's something to bring a smile to his face.
▪ It brought a smile to her lips.
▪ Nothing was more likely to bring a smile to his face than being told he was talked about.
▪ She invented a hundred little things to make him happy, to bring a smile to his face.
▪ The thought brought a smile to his face.
▪ Their screams of horror and cries for mercy only brought a smile to my face.
▪ We thank him profusely, and manage to bring a smile to his face.
curl of sb's lip/mouth
▪ David had always treated them with a superior curl of the lip.
dry mouth/skin/lips/hair etc
▪ Finesse's hairspray formulations are non-sticky, and yet give perfect control when applied to dry hair.
▪ For 24 hours a day, the irritation caused by severely dry skin verges on torture.
▪ In places the green is so thick on the page that it develops a gloss like the dried skin of oil paint.
▪ Just as you care for dry skin on the face, the scalp needs a soothing touch ... gentle cleansing and moisturising.
▪ Make sure you use a moisturising shampoo and conditioner for dry hair.
▪ Simply spray Hot Shapes on to clean, dry hair before setting to get instant hold with a glossy finish.
▪ Specific questioning showed symptoms of dry eyes and dry mouth.
▪ There may be a dry burning sensation; a dry mouth, ropy mucus, mouth ulcers.
fall from sb's lips
▪ In her excitement, words fell from her lips in a torrent.
▪ No false word ever falls from his lips.
give sb a smack on the lips/cheek
lick your lips
▪ A rare, special smell that should have had her licking her lips and counting the hours until lunch.
▪ Digby could almost hear the commentators licking their lips.
▪ He licked his lips and looked at my laughing mouth.
▪ He bared his teeth and licked his lips, as Blackberry had done before the dead hedgehog on the road.
▪ Plummer licked his lips and frowned.
▪ She licked her lips and read fast.
▪ The other licks his lips, and stares at Slothrop.
not pass sb's lips
pay lip service to sb/sth
▪ It pays lip service to local choices but provides no specific means to make them more rational and efficient.
▪ Politicians pay lip service to crime.
▪ Previous governments have paid lip service to the idea but achieved little.
▪ The conventional methodology tends to pay lip service to user involvement.
▪ The professors all pay lip service to welcoming every point of view, but most really do not.
▪ They pay lip service to equality but they don't want to have to do anything committed about it.
▪ Though everybody pays lip service to performance, politics is often the ultimate arbiter of their fate.
▪ We need to stop paying lip service to them.
read my lips
read sb's lips
rosebud mouth/lips
▪ Corrie had a short, snub nose and rosebud mouth, and her eyes were a smoky grey.
▪ I looked down at the perfect rosebud lips, the determined chin and the tiny clenched fists of my cub.
▪ The rosebud mouth was painted a glowing coral pink, an exotic contrast with her creamy olive skin, liquid dark eyes.
smack your lips
▪ Cranston snored gently like a child, muttering now and again and smacking his lips.
▪ Granny Weatherwax smacked her lips, like some one emerging from a very deep sleep.
▪ He smacked his lips and stroked his moustache with surprise.
▪ She begins cackling, smacking her lips, like a child thinking of a turkey dinner.
▪ Shove his face into his own shit, they were learning, and he will devour it, smacking his lips.
▪ The chimpanzee then pulls out the grass stem and picks off the termites with its teeth, smacking its lips with pleasure.
▪ The woman seemed to be smacking her lips over every word.
▪ The young one smacked his lips.
stiff upper lip
▪ All he could produce was a stiff upper lip, while young Lady C cast meaningful looks at sturdy gamekeeper Mellors.
▪ Election losers, for instance, are traditionally expected to keep a stiff upper lip and not let their disappointment show.
▪ Paul didn't keep a stiff upper lip because that was the way that he thought that Christians should behave.
▪ So please, leave the stiff upper lip to one side, at home at least.
▪ The stiff upper lip is a barrier against the trembling which could lead to tears.
▪ The Ulster Unionist security spokesman maintained a stiff upper lip as he had his moustache shaved off - for charity.
zip it/zip your lip
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Her lower lip was red and swollen.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He had his eyes shut and his lips moved devoutly.
▪ He licks his lips nervously, but he doesn't move.
▪ He was sitting on the wooden lip of the hot tub.
▪ Sometimes her lips moved and she muttered something in a low tone.
▪ You're fined sixpence for lip.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Lip

Lip \Lip\, v. t. To clip; to trim. [Obs.]
--Holland.

Lip

Lip \Lip\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lipped (l[i^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. Lipping (-p[i^]ng).]

  1. To touch with the lips; to put the lips to; hence, to kiss.

    The bubble on the wine which breaks Before you lip the glass.
    --Praed.

    A hand that kings Have lipped and trembled kissing.
    --Shak.

  2. To utter; to speak. [R.]
    --Keats.

Lip

Lip \Lip\ (l[i^]p), n. [OE. lippe, AS. lippa; akin to D. lip, G. lippe, lefze, OHG. lefs, Dan. l[ae]be, Sw. l["a]pp, L. labium, labrum. Cf. Labial.]

  1. One of the two fleshy folds which surround the orifice of the mouth in man and many other animals. In man the lips are organs of speech essential to certain articulations. Hence, by a figure they denote the mouth, or all the organs of speech, and sometimes speech itself.

    Thine own lips testify against thee.
    --Job xv. 6.

  2. An edge of an opening; a thin projecting part of anything; a kind of short open spout; as, the lip of a vessel.

  3. The sharp cutting edge on the end of an auger.

  4. (Bot.)

    1. One of the two opposite divisions of a labiate corolla.

    2. The odd and peculiar petal in the Orchis family. See Orchidaceous.

  5. (Zo["o]l.) One of the edges of the aperture of a univalve shell.

  6. Impudent or abusive talk; as, don't give me any of your lip. [Slang] Syn: jaw. Lip bit, a pod auger. See Auger. Lip comfort, comfort that is given with words only. Lip comforter, one who comforts with words only. Lip labor, unfelt or insincere speech; hypocrisy. --Bale. Lip reading, the catching of the words or meaning of one speaking by watching the motion of his lips without hearing his voice. --Carpenter. Lip salve, a salve for sore lips. Lip service, expression by the lips of obedience and devotion without the performance of acts suitable to such sentiments. Lip wisdom, wise talk without practice, or unsupported by experience. Lip work.

    1. Talk.

    2. Kissing. [Humorous]
      --B. Jonson.

      To make a lip, to drop the under lip in sullenness or contempt.
      --Shak.

      To shoot out the lip (Script.), to show contempt by protruding the lip.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
lip

Old English lippa, from Proto-Germanic *lepjon (cognates: Old Frisian lippa, Middle Dutch lippe, Dutch lip, Old High German lefs, German Lefze, Swedish läpp, Danish læbe), from PIE *leb- "to lick; lip" (source also of Latin labium).\n

\nFrench lippe is from a Germanic source. Transferred sense of "edge or margin of a cup, etc." is from 1590s. Slang sense "saucy talk" is from 1821, probably from move the lip (1570s) "utter even the slightest word (against someone)." To bite (one's) lip "show vexation" is from early 14c. Stiff upper lip as a sign of courage is from 1833. Lip gloss is attested from 1939; lip balm from 1877. Related: Lips.

lip

c.1600, "to kiss," from lip (n.). Meaning "to pronounce with the lips only" is from 1789. Related: Lipped; lipping.

Wiktionary
lip

n. 1 (context countable English) Either of the two fleshy protrusions around the opening of the mouth. 2 (context countable English) A part of the body that resembles a lip, such as the edge of a wound or the labi

  1. v

  2. 1 To touch with the lips; to kiss or lick; to lap the lips against something. 2 To utter verbally. 3 To simulate speech merely by lip-movement, as suffices for a lip-reader. 4 (context sports English) to make a golf ball hit the lip of the cup, without dropping in.

WordNet
lip
  1. n. fleshy folds of tissue as those surrounding the mouth

  2. an impudent or insolent rejoinder; "don't give me any of your sass" [syn: sass, sassing, backtalk, back talk, mouth]

  3. the top edge of a vessel [syn: brim, rim]

  4. [also: lipping, lipped]

Wikipedia
Lip (disambiguation)

Lip (plural lips or labia) may refer to:

Lip

Lips are a visible body part at the mouth of humans and many animals.

Lips are soft, movable, and serve as the opening for food intake and in the articulation of sound and speech. Human lips are a tactile sensory organ, and can be erogenous when used in kissing and other acts of intimacy.

LIP (company)

LIP is a French watch and clock company whose turmoil became emblematic of the conflicts between workers and management in France.

The LIP factory, based in Besançon in eastern France, was having financial problems in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and management decided to try to close it. However, after strikes and a highly publicized factory occupation in 1973, LIP became worker-managed. All the fired employees were rehired by March 1974, but the firm was liquidated again in the spring of 1976. This led to a new struggle, called "the social conflict of the 1970s" by the daily newspaper Libération.

Confédération Française Démocratique du Travail (CFDT) union leader Charles Piaget led the strike. The Unified Socialist Party (PSU), which included former Radical Pierre Mendès-France, was then in favor of autogestion ( workers' self-management).

Lip (gastropod)

In the shell of gastropod mollusks (a snail shell), the lip is the free margin of the peristome (synonym: peritreme) or aperture (the opening) of the gastropod shell.

In dextral (right-handed) shells (most snail shells are right-handed), the right side or outer side of the aperture is known as the outer lip (labrum). The left side of the aperture is known as the inner lip or columellar lip (labium) if there is a pronounced lip there. In those species where there is no pronounced lip, the part of the body whorl that adjoins the aperture is known as the parietal wall.

The outer lip is usually thin and sharp in immature shells, and in some adults (e.g. the land snails Helicella and Bulimulus). However, in some other land snails and in many marine species the outer lip is thickened (also called callused), or reflected (turned outwards). In some other marine species it is curled inwards (inflected), as in the cowries such as Cypraea. It can also be expanded, as in Strombus; it can have finger-like processes (digitate) or it can be fringed with spines (foliated), as in Murex.

The lip is called emarginate when it is incised or slit, as in Pleurotomaria. It is described as effuse when the basal or anterior extremity is slightly produced, depressed or reflected, as in Thiara. When the lip is bent into an "s" curve it is called sinuous, as is the case in the sigmoidal margin of Janthina exigua.

Interiorly when the lip has teeth it is dentate as in Nerita. When the teeth are rib-like it is described as plicate or lamellate. When it has numerous large plications, nodules or teeth it is known as ringent, as in Pythia. The lip is called sulcate, when it is grooved within. It is known as labiate or marginate, when it is callously thickened near the margin.

Usage examples of "lip".

Their breaths mingled there between them, their lips mere inches apart, and Abigail could not tear her eyes away from his mesmerizing gaze.

I see for the least instant that Her lips are not quite firm and Her eyes abrim with tears.

The lower lip curved outward, making a platform that abutted at the height of perhaps a hundred feet upon a sinister-looking gorge below.

His upper lip was furry and mobile, making his face more expressive than those of earlier adapid species.

Through the space between slack lips, Vicki could hear heavy adenoidal breathing.

But the words had hardly left his lips before the aeroplane was back on a level keel once more.

Red Indian chief in full war- paint, the lined lips compressed to a thread, eyes wrinkled, nostrils aflare, and the whole face lit by so naked a passion of hate that I started.

Out front on the green cement lawn a tiptoed Cupid, wings aflutter, squirted from pouty lips an eternal stream of blue-colored water into a marble pool deep in good-luck coins and casino chips.

Lennox lifted his head up over the starboard aft lip of the sail, looking for the position of the Jianghu fast frigate, which was nowhere in sight.

Both also were almost physical carbon copies of their ageless mother except for higher-pitched voices and thicker lips.

At the Royal Canal bridge, from his hoarding, Mr Eugene Stratton, his blub lips agrin, bade all comers welcome to Pembroke township.

There are groups of women of every age, decked out in their smartest clothes, crowds of mousmes with aigrettes of flowers in their hair, or little silver topknots like Oyouki--pretty little physiognomies, little, narrow eyes peeping between their slits like those of new-born kittens, fat, pale, little cheeks, round, puffed-out, half-opened lips.

She chewed her lower lip as a million places sprang to mind, bat driving aimlessly around was pointless.

ASIA: You said that spirits spoke, but it was thee Sweet sister, for even now thy curved lips Tremble as if the sound were dying there Not dead PANTHEA: Alas it was Prometheus spoke Within me, and I know it must be so I mixed my own weak nature with his love .

His captor, a round-faced man with a scar twisting his lower lip, rattled off some sort of challenge, punctuating it by poking Alec in the chest with his finger.