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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
keel
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
even
▪ Confusion seems to reign in many areas of your life at present, so try to get on an even keel.
▪ So when we got up here, I was really enjoying sort of keeping things on an even keel at home.
▪ Others may yearn for life on a more even keel but they do not feel entitled to it.
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ That Nigel was on an even keel again was a double comfort.
▪ In Chapter 11, companies' management usually remains in place while the company tries to get back on an even keel.
▪ By the time the taxi had delivered them to the restaurant Fabia was feeling on more of an even keel.
▪ Then maybe they are on an even keel.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ At the same time, the keel can be reinforced with extra pieces of spare fabric, and eyelets riveted in place.
▪ But then he wasn't carrying tons of lead on a keel that had to be dragged through the water.
▪ Had the peak risen up from the waters and punctured the keel, thereby skewering the vessel in place?
▪ I was supposed to be a caretaker, charged with setting the branch back on an even keel.
▪ So when we got up here, I was really enjoying sort of keeping things on an even keel at home.
▪ These bronze fastenings protrude through the keel and would have secured the main station frames of the hull.
▪ These two kept her on an even keel.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
over
▪ Once Muzzy Izzet had rounded off a neatly worked equaliser the Second Division side might have been expected to keel over.
▪ Truly I would keel over in spasms of exquisite nostalgia.
▪ His momentum carried him as far as the launcher and with out-thrust foot he sent it keeling over on to its side.
▪ The worker on the ladder looks as if he is ready to keel over from exhaustion.
▪ Frighten or surprise one and it will stiffen and keel over in what appears to be a dead faint.
▪ She hated him, hated him, her respect and breathless excitement keeling over under the weight of her rage and humiliation.
▪ It would allow him to go quietly in his sleep or keel over happily on the fourth green.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Frighten or surprise one and it will stiffen and keel over in what appears to be a dead faint.
▪ His momentum carried him as far as the launcher and with out-thrust foot he sent it keeling over on to its side.
▪ It would allow him to go quietly in his sleep or keel over happily on the fourth green.
▪ Once Muzzy Izzet had rounded off a neatly worked equaliser the Second Division side might have been expected to keel over.
▪ She hated him, hated him, her respect and breathless excitement keeling over under the weight of her rage and humiliation.
▪ The worker on the ladder looks as if he is ready to keel over from exhaustion.
▪ Truly I would keel over in spasms of exquisite nostalgia.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Keel

Keel \Keel\ (k[=e]l), v. t. & i. [AS. c[=e]lan to cool, fr. c[=o]l cool. See Cool.] To cool; to skim or stir. [Obs.]

While greasy Joan doth keel the pot.
--Shak.

Keel

Keel \Keel\, n. A brewer's cooling vat; a keelfat.

Keel

Keel \Keel\, n. [Cf. AS. ce['o]l ship; akin to D. & G. kiel keel, OHG. chiol ship, Icel. kj[=o]ll, and perh. to Gr. gay^los a round-built Ph[oe]nician merchant vessel, gaylo`s bucket; cf. Skr. g[=o]la ball, round water vessel. But the meaning of the English word seems to come from Icel. kj["o]lr keel, akin to Sw. k["o]l, Dan. kj["o]l.]

  1. (Shipbuilding) A longitudinal timber, or series of timbers scarfed together, extending from stem to stern along the bottom of a vessel. It is the principal timber of the vessel, and, by means of the ribs attached on each side, supports the vessel's frame. In an iron vessel, a combination of plates supplies the place of the keel of a wooden ship. See Illust. of Keelson.

  2. Fig.: The whole ship.

  3. A barge or lighter, used on the Tyne for carrying coal from Newcastle; also, a barge load of coal, twenty-one tons, four cwt. [Eng.]

  4. (Bot.) The two lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower, united and inclosing the stamens and pistil; a carina. See Carina.

  5. (Nat. Hist.) A projecting ridge along the middle of a flat or curved surface.

  6. (Aeronautics) In a dirigible, a construction similar in form and use to a ship's keel; in an a["e]roplane, a fin or fixed surface employed to increase stability and to hold the machine to its course. Bilge keel (Naut.), a keel peculiar to ironclad vessels, extending only a portion of the length of the vessel under the bilges. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. False keel. See under False. Keel boat.

    1. A covered freight boat, with a keel, but no sails, used on Western rivers. [U. S.]

    2. A low, flat-bottomed freight boat. See Keel, n., 3.

      Keel piece, one of the timbers or sections of which a keel is composed.

      On even keel, in a level or horizontal position, so that the draught of water at the stern and the bow is the same.
      --Ham. Nav. Encyc.

      On an even keel a. & adv., steady; balanced; steadily.

Keel

Keel \Keel\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Keeled; p. pr. & vb. n. Keeling.]

  1. To traverse with a keel; to navigate.

  2. To turn up the keel; to show the bottom.

    To keel over, to upset; to capsize. [Colloq.]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
keel

"lowest timber of a ship or boat," mid-14c., probably from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse kjölr "keel," Danish kjøl, Swedish köl), from Proto-Germanic *keluz, of uncertain origin. Some etymologists say this is unconnected with the keel that means "a ship, barge," which also is the root of Middle Dutch kiel "ship," Old English ceol "ship's prow," Old High German kiel, German Kiel "ship," but the two words have influenced each other. Barnhart, however, calls them cognates. Keel still is used locally in England and U.S. for "flat-bottomed boat," especially on the Tyne.

keel

"to keep cool," from Middle English kelen, from Old English celan "to cool," from col "cool" (see cool). The form kele (from Old English colian) was used by Shakespeare, but it later was assimilated with the adjective form into the modern verb cool. Cognate with Dutch koelen, Old High German chuolen, German kühlen.

keel

1838, American English, from keel (n.). To keel over (1876) is from the nautical image of a ship turning keel-up. Related: Keeled; keeling.

Wiktionary
keel

n. 1 (context nautical English) A large beam along the underside of a ship’s hull from bow to stern. 2 (context nautical English) Sometimes, a rigid, flat piece of material anchored to the lowest part of the hull of a ship to give it greater control and stability. 3 (context aeronautics English) In a dirigible, a construction similar in form and use to a ship's keel; in an aeroplane, a fin or fixed surface employed to increase stability and to hold the machine to its course. 4 (context nautical English) A type of flat-bottomed boat. 5 A material similar to chalk or crayon used to mark pavement. 6 (context zoology English) The periphery of a whorl extended to form a more or less flattened plate; a prominent spiral ridge. 7 (context botany English) The two lowest petals of the corolla of a papilionaceous flower, united and enclosing the stamens and pistil; a carin

  1. 8 A brewer's cooling vat. v

  2. 1 (context intransitive followed by "over" English) to collapse, to fall 2 To traverse with a keel; to navigate. 3 To turn up the keel; to show the bottom.

WordNet
keel

v. walk as if unable to control one's movements; "The drunken man staggered into the room" [syn: stagger, reel, lurch, swag, careen]

keel
  1. n. the median ridge on the breastbone of birds that fly

  2. one of the main longitudinal beams (or plates) of the hull of a vessel; can extend vertically into the water to provide lateral stability

Wikipedia
KEEL

KEEL (710 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a News Talk Information format. Licensed to Shreveport, Louisiana, USA, the station serves the Shreveport area. The station is currently owned by Townsquare Media and features programming from ABC Radio and airs Louisiana Tech games. Its studios are shared with its other five sister stations in West Shreveport (one mile west of Shreveport Regional Airport), and the transmitter is in Mooringsport, Louisiana.

Among the KEEL programs are the statewide The Moon Griffon Show and the nationally carried Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Mark Levin, and Andy Dean. C.L. Bryant, an African-American conservative, also broadcasts from KEEL from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. nightly.

Bob Griffin, former KSLA broadcast journalist and sports anchor, hosts a Christian weekly half-hour program, The Bob Griffin Radio Show, which is aired from KEEL and also carried on four stations in East Texas: KGAS (AM) in Carthage, KMHT (AM) in Marshall, KWRD (AM) in Henderson, and KPXI in Overton, which serves Tyler and Longview. The program consists of travel reports, features, area personalities, and uplifting human interest stories, often with Christian testimonies. At 6:50 a.m. CST weekdays on KEEL, he airs a minute-long feature, "People to Meet, Places to Go, and Things to See and Do".

Keel (band)

Keel is an American heavy metal band founded in 1984 in Los Angeles, California. They are known for their rock anthem "The Right to Rock." The band was active until 1989, with a brief reunion in 1998. Keel reunited again in 2008 and toured in 2009 for their 25th anniversary.

Keel (album)

Keel is the fourth album by the American glam metal band Keel, released on June 21, 1987. This was the last album to feature guitarists Marc Ferrari and Bryan Jay, as they left the band a year later (although Jay can be heard on the live portion of the band's next release, Larger Than Live.) They eventually re-joined Keel in 1998 to release Keel VI: Back in Action and again in 2009 for the band's 25th anniversary.

This was the band's first album since their 1984 debut Lay Down the Law to be produced by someone other than Gene Simmons.

Keel (disambiguation)

A keel is the central beam of the hull of a boat. Keel may also be:

  • Keel (anatomy), several meanings
Keel (unit)

Keel was a unit used to measure coal in the northeast of England, being the quantity of coal carried by a keelboat on the Tyne and Wear rivers. In 1750 it was said to be equal to 8 Newcastle chaldrons (waggons), a measure of volume, or a weight of 21 tons 4 cwt (approx. 21.5 metric tons).

Keel (anatomy)

A keel (or in Latin carina), in anatomy, is a structure whose shape resembles the keel of a boat. The term may refer to :

Keel (bird anatomy)

A keel or carina (plural carinae) in bird anatomy is an extension of the sternum (breastbone) which runs axially along the midline of the sternum and extends outward, perpendicular to the plane of the ribs. The keel provides an anchor to which a bird's wing muscles attach, thereby providing adequate leverage for flight. Keels do not exist on all birds; in particular, some flightless birds lack a keel structure.

Historically, the presence or absence of a pronounced keel structure was used as a broad classification of birds into two orders: Carinatae (from carina, "keel"), having a pronounced keel; and ratites (from ratis, "raft" — referring to the flatness of the sternum), having a subtle keel structure or lacking one entirely. However, this classification has fallen into disuse as evolutionary studies have shown that many flightless birds have evolved from flighted birds. The current definition of Carinatae now includes all extant birds.

Usage examples of "keel".

In another hour I had the se acock installed, the line freed from the keel and the boat floating upright in her shady berth.

But the words had hardly left his lips before the aeroplane was back on a level keel once more.

Then he straightened out the ailerons and elevators, and began to run on a level keel.

In this fashion they ran for fifteen or twenty miles on a perfectly even keel, the apparatus automatically working the elevators and ailerons of the craft as various wind currents tended to disturb its equilibrium.

The torpedo struck Blucher five feet below the surface, on the very tip of her curved keel.

I heard the keel grating against the rough calcareous bottom of the coral reef.

When any of the silly young clunches in my regiment locked up their knees while at attention and keeled over, loosening their collars was always one of the first things I did.

And, boy, did they know from tack downhaul, kicking strap, mainsheet, clew outhaul, topping lift, boom, tack, reefing points, leech, spreader, foresail hanks, shrouds, inner forestay, stanchion, toe rail, and fin keel!

Hijgend, klam van zweet, doorvloeid van een doffe lauwte, met een verschroeide keel stond zij op, verfrischte zich het gelaat in een natten handdoek, en dronk een, twee drie glazen water achter elkander.

A week after, in the recess between the Chimneys and the cliff, a dockyard was prepared, and a keel five-and-thirty feet long, furnished with a stern-post at the stern and a stem at the bows, lay along the sand.

Towards the bows, on both sides of the keel, seven or eight feet from the beginning of the stem, the sides of the brig were frightfully torn.

The keel, of good oak, measured 110 feet in length, this allowing a width of five-and-twenty feet to the midship beam.

Photodilus seem not to have been investigated, but it has been found to want the tarsal loop, as well as the manubrial process, while its clavicles are not joined in a furcula, nor do they meet the keel, and the posterior margin of the sternum has processes and fissures like the tawny section.

In Hawaii he constructed a two-hulled vessel using modern tools, joinery and metalwork--including steel springs to reduce the racking strains on the connexions between the hulls, large sawn beams for keel plates, and nuts, bolts, and nails.

This is the sort of weather when brave hearts snap ashore, and keeled hulls split at sea.