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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
jerk
I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
around
▪ She jerked around and the wire stretched a little, but that was all.
▪ Sister Zoe jerked around, her full black skirt ballooning as she hurried to my side.
away
▪ That sudden movement, slight as it was, jerked away the stone which Chignell had placed behind one of the wheels.
▪ When I tried to pick him up he squirmed wildly, jerked away and threw himself to the ground again.
▪ He patted my head, brushing his fingers across my ear, and I jerked away.
▪ He grabbed his daughter's long sleeve, but she jerked away, ripping the flower-embroidered linen, towards the other table.
▪ He stretched out a hand to touch her face and she jerked away.
▪ Recollecting herself suddenly, she jerked away sharply.
back
▪ It is jerked back into order by the chapters voiced by the caring Anacreonte.
▪ She jerked back, surprised by the anger on his face, then reassured by the apology she saw there.
▪ I jerked back up under the covers before he saw me looking.
▪ Dyson half expected him to come jerking back for a reprise of the First Collect.
▪ Christopher jerked back and kicked, and the bowl of water spilt into the chair, over his legs and over Alan.
▪ The pupa's skull is jerked back, its jaw dislocated and its eyes suddenly black and empty.
▪ I jerked back, tingling with fear, feeling it peel off like a strand of elastoplast.
forward
▪ In no time at all it jerked forward, and there I was, on my way.
▪ The horse stopped, so suddenly that I was jerked forward on his neck.
▪ He Wrked the handle, brought the bolt rearward, then drove it forward jerking the handle down.
▪ But her sudden command made him stand violently on the pedal and they were both jerked forward against their seat-belts.
▪ Philippa's hand jerked forward anxiously and knocked over the bottle of varnish remover.
▪ The left knee is then jerked forward while the right leg is extended in a clockwise arc.
▪ His torso jerked forward convulsively, and he vomited into the mud and the rain.
round
▪ As she picked up the notebook she heard a sound close behind her and jerked round.
▪ Marcus went white and jerked round sharply to look at the figure behind him.
up
▪ And every time I came to that bit I jerked up in my chair and Miss Ross shouted at me.
▪ He grinned and his hands jerked up, tangling with the air as if he wanted to grab her.
▪ She jerked up his arm, and spun round under it.
▪ He ignored me, jerked up and down and wailed bitterly as he clung to her.
▪ Less than a second later he was jerked up and around to meet a devastating punch straight to the jaw.
▪ The full impact of it seemed to come from the roof, and was so strong that she jerked up in bed.
▪ Even the swings troubled her, dark shapes jerking up at the limit of her vision.
▪ His head jerked up in her direction then went back to studying the ground.
■ NOUN
body
▪ If his body jerked when he was struck again, and fatally, it was no more than an instant's convulsion.
▪ His whole body had jerked, he had nearly hit buy rather than sell mid-deal.
▪ Tom Dawson's body arched and jerked.
▪ Slowly Tommy placed his arm on the floor, his whole body jerking with fear.
▪ Their bodies jerked up and down, twisting and jumping.
▪ Then the drop and the slim, lithe body jerking violently at the end of the rope.
foot
▪ It jerked his foot banged his knee and was yanked back open.
hand
▪ As he choked, Gazzer's right hand jerked spasmodically behind him, clutching at Simon's jacket.
▪ He grinned and his hands jerked up, tangling with the air as if he wanted to grab her.
▪ It was in her hand when the soldier jerked her roughly around and pulled her against him.
▪ His hand jerked across the desk, but Litchfield pushed it back.
▪ Terrified that he would guess her wanton reaction to the heart-stopping touch of his hand, Isabel jerked her head away.
▪ Philippa's hand jerked forward anxiously and knocked over the bottle of varnish remover.
▪ Harry grabbed her hand and jerked her back into his arms.
▪ She put both hands before her and jerked wide awake with a scream.
head
▪ Thérèse's head jerked round: how?
▪ Garty's head jerked violently sideways; he lurched, stumbled, almost fell, then seemed to find his balance again.
▪ His head jerked up in her direction then went back to studying the ground.
▪ Flesh-skimped fingers entwined themselves in his hair and Creed cried out as his head was jerked back.
▪ The soldier woke up with a snort; his head jerked up and he looked at us inquiringly.
▪ Wexford took hold of his jacket roughly, pushing him so that his head jerked up.
knee
▪ Again people are asking why, while politicians' knees are jerking frantically.
▪ The left knee is then jerked forward while the right leg is extended in a clockwise arc.
▪ His knee jerked up and down to the clacking of the metronome on the piano lid.
thumb
▪ He waved and grinned at her and jerked a thumb upwards.
▪ The doctor jerked a thumb to the right.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
come/roll/jerk/skid etc to a stop
▪ A limousine carrying Harris and several other black passengers jerked to a stop.
▪ An unshaven old man in a stained jacket comes to a stop beside us.
▪ And moments later he comes to a stop.
▪ As it came to a stop, it widened the frenzied cluster of moths surrounding the yellow platform light over his head.
▪ He had given no sign of injury until we came to a stop.
▪ It swerved wildly towards the wall, bounced over the pavement and came to a stop four feet from the concrete wall.
▪ Once it has been consumed, the Darwinian machine comes to a stop.
▪ When it jerked to a stop they were led out into a narrow carpeted passage.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Graham had to jerk the steering wheel to the left to avoid a crash.
▪ He jerked the string and the light came on.
▪ Isabel jerked her hand away from his and shoved it in her pocket.
▪ Mark jerked the phone away from the girl.
▪ Sue jerked her thumb toward the garage.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A limousine carrying Harris and several other black passengers jerked to a stop.
▪ Bonaventure, but none of them reported any of the jerking movement, incontinence or tongue-biting that usually accompanies seizures.
▪ He jerked upright when the phone rang.
▪ His whole body had jerked, he had nearly hit buy rather than sell mid-deal.
▪ In the early hours of the morning, at about three, Stephen jerked awake from a nightmare.
▪ She mouthed the name at Ottershaw, and he jerked his head towards the kitchen.
▪ The doctor jerked a thumb to the right.
▪ The seat beneath me swayed and jerked according to the simplemindedness of that hunching locomotive fit for a child.
▪ They jerked wildly in toward the cliff, among the blocks of stone.
▪ Two men appeared in front of him, and he caught her wrist and jerked her to one side, raising his sword.
II.noun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ He's an unprofessional jerk who's always pestering the women in the office.
▪ Her husband was being a real jerk about the divorce.
▪ I liked the job, but the manager was a jerk.
▪ Ignore him. He's just a jerk.
▪ Ow! You jerk, that hurt!
▪ She pulled the dog back with a sharp jerk of his leash.
▪ She seems to always end up in a relationship with some total jerk.
▪ Some jerk just drove right into the back of my car.
▪ The train moved off with a jerk.
▪ Why do you put up with a jerk like that?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ His eyes blinked violently in a spasm that screwed up his face in rapid jerks.
▪ The man indicated the one in the far corner with a jerk of his head.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Jerk

Jerk \Jerk\ (j[~e]rk), v. t. [Corrupted from Peruv. charqui dried beef.] To cut into long slices or strips and dry in the sun; as, to jerk beef. See Charqui.

Jerk

Jerk \Jerk\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jerked (j[~e]rkt); p. pr. & vb. n. Jerking.] [Akin to yerk, and perh. also to yard a measure.]

  1. To beat; to strike. [Obs.]
    --Florio.

  2. To give a quick and suddenly arrested thrust, push, pull, or twist, to; to yerk; as, to jerk one with the elbow; to jerk a coat off.

  3. To throw with a quick and suddenly arrested motion of the hand; as, to jerk a stone.

Jerk

Jerk \Jerk\, v. i.

  1. To make a sudden motion; to move with a start, or by starts.
    --Milton.

  2. To flout with contempt.

Jerk

Jerk \Jerk\, n.

  1. A short, sudden pull, thrust, push, twitch, jolt, shake, or similar motion.

    His jade gave him a jerk.
    --B. Jonson.

  2. A sudden start or spring.

    Lobsters . . . swim backwards by jerks or springs.
    --Grew.

  3. A foolish, stupid, or otherwise contemptible person.

    Syn: jerkoff.

  4. (Sport) The lifting of a weight, in a single rapid motion, from shoulder height until the arms are outstretched above the head; distinguished from press in that the motion in a jerk is more rapid, and the body may be moved under the weight to assist completion of the movement; as, a clean and jerk of two hundred pounds.

    2. Calisthenic exercises, such as push-ups or deep knee bends; also called physical jerks. [British]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
jerk

"to pull," 1540s, "to lash, strike as with a whip," of uncertain origin, perhaps echoic. Related: Jerked; jerking.

jerk

as a method of preserving meat, 1707, American English, from American Spanish carquear, from charqui (see jerky). Related: Jerked.

jerk

"tedious and ineffectual person," 1935 (the lyric in "Big Rock Candy Mountain" apparently is "Where they hung the Turk [not jerk] that invented work"), American English carnival slang, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from jerkwater town (1878), where a steam locomotive crew had to take on boiler water from a trough or a creek because there was no water tank [Barnhart, OED]. This led 1890s to an adjectival use of jerk as "inferior, insignificant." Alternatively, or influenced by, verbal phrase jerk off "masturbate" [Rawson].

jerk

1550s, "stroke of a whip," from jerk (v.1). Sense of "sudden sharp pull or twist" first recorded 1570s. Meaning "involuntary spasmodic movement of limbs or features" first recorded 1805. As the name of a popular dance, it is attested from 1966. Sense in soda jerk attested from 1883, from the pulling motion required to work the taps.

Wiktionary
jerk

Etymology 1 alt. 1 A sudden, often uncontrolled movement, especially of the body. 2 A quick, often unpleasant tug or shake. 3 (context US slang pejorative English) A dull or stupid person. 4 (context US slang pejorative English) A person with unlikable or obnoxious qualities and behavior, typically mean, self-centered(,) or disagreeable. 5 (context physics engineering English) The rate of change in acceleration with respect to time. 6 (context obsolete English) A soda jerk. 7 (context weightlifting English) A lift in which the weight is taken with a quick motion from shoulder height to a position above the head with arms fully extended and held there for a brief time. n. 1 A sudden, often uncontrolled movement, especially of the body. 2 A quick, often unpleasant tug or shake. 3 (context US slang pejorative English) A dull or stupid person. 4 (context US slang pejorative English) A person with unlikable or obnoxious qualities and behavior, typically mean, self-centered(,) or disagreeable. 5 (context physics engineering English) The rate of change in acceleration with respect to time. 6 (context obsolete English) A soda jerk. 7 (context weightlifting English) A lift in which the weight is taken with a quick motion from shoulder height to a position above the head with arms fully extended and held there for a brief time. vb. 1 (context intransitive English) To make a sudden uncontrolled movement. 2 (context transitive English) To give a quick, often unpleasant tug or shake. 3 (context US slang vulgar English) To masturbate. 4 (context obsolete English) To beat, to hit. 5 (context obsolete English) To throw with a quick and suddenly arrested motion of the hand. 6 (context usually transitive weightlifting English) To lift using a jerk. 7 (context obsolete English) To flout with contempt. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context Caribbean English) A rich, spicy Jamaican marinade 2 (context Caribbean English) Meat cured by jerking; charqui. vb. To cure (meat) by cutting it into strips and drying it, originally in the sun.

WordNet
jerk
  1. v. pull, or move with a sudden movement; "He turned the handle and jerked the door open" [syn: yank]

  2. move with abrupt, seemingly uncontrolled motions; "The patient's legs were jerkings" [syn: twitch]

  3. make an uncontrolled, short, jerky motion; "his face is twitching" [syn: twitch]

  4. jump vertically, with legs stiff and back arched; "the yung filly bucked" [syn: buck, hitch]

  5. throw or toss with a quick motion; "flick a piece of paper across the table"; "jerk his head" [syn: flick]

jerk
  1. n. a dull stupid fatuous person [syn: dork]

  2. an abrupt spasmodic movement [syn: jerking, jolt]

  3. (mechanics) the rate of change of velocity [syn: rate of acceleration]

  4. a sudden abrupt pull [syn: tug]

Wikipedia
Jerk (band)

Jerk were an Australian industrial metal band formed in 1998. They released a sole album, When Pure Is Defiled (April 2003), with the line-up of Charles Cilia, Leeno Dee, Johnathan Devoy and Lamar Lowder, which peaked at No. 38 on the ARIA Albums Chart. Their song "Sucked In" was used in the video games, Need for Speed: Underground and NHL 2004. Jerk supported gigs by Marilyn Manson, Insane Clown Posse, Killing Joke and Disturbed on their respective tours.

Jerk (physics)

In physics, jerk, also known as jolt, surge, or lurch, is the rate of change of acceleration; that is, the derivative of acceleration with respect to time, and as such the second derivative of velocity, or the third derivative of position. Jerk is a vector, and there is no generally used term to describe its scalar magnitude (more precisely, its norm, e.g. "speed" as the norm of the velocity vector). According to the result of dimensional analysis of jerk, [length/time], the SI units are m/s (or m·s); jerk can also be expressed in standard gravity per second (g/s).

Jerk

Jerk or the Jerk may refer to:

Titled works:

  • Jerk (album), by hHead
  • Jerk (play)
  • The Jerk (1979), film
  • "The Jerk" (House episode) on television
  • "Jerk", a 1996 song by Kim Stockwood

Other:

  • Jerk (band)
  • Jerk (dance)
  • Jerk (physics), aspect of variable motion
Jerk (album)

Jerk is the second album by Canadian alternative/indie rock band hHead, released in 1994. The prize money that hHead won from a CFNY-FM contest went towards paying the costs for making this album. Some critics say that this album sounded a lot more 'produced' than the previous album, Fireman, mainly because of the style change, from a garagey sound to a more professional sound.

Videos were made for "Answers" and "Happy".

Jerk (dance)

The jerk was a popular or fad dance in the 1960s.

Jerk (play)

Jerk is a one-person puppet play by the American writer Dennis Cooper, made in collaboration with director Gisèle Vienne and performer Jonathan Capdevielle, based on Cooper's 1993 novel of the same name. It is based on the story of serial killer Dean Corll and his teenage accomplices David Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley. The play develops the conceit that Brooks has learnt puppetry in prison and, as part of his rehabilitation, acts out the murders in which he participated via the use of glove puppets and ventriloquism. The performance also involved sections in which the audience read about the murders in pamphlets, entitled "Two Texts for a Puppet Play by David Brooks" that were distributed.

The production premiered on 5 March 2008 in Brest, France. The play was also performed in an English-language version at the South London Gallery as part of the Paris Calling season of performing arts, opening on 1 July 2009. Its performance included music by Peter Rehberg.

In his analysis of Jerk, theater scholar Jordan Schildcrout states, "The production becomes a meta-puppet show when the actor playing David is giving voice to the puppets playing the killers, who in turn give voice to the puppets playing the corpses... In the final scenario, though, David abandons his puppets and does all the voices, including his own, as a ventriloquist, not moving his lips, as if he is also losing his humanity, becoming increasingly inanimate. In the story, David is ultimately alone in a house of corpses, and in performance he is alone on an empty stage, with only lifeless puppets sharing the space."

Usage examples of "jerk".

They now came up over the big dirigible and tried to plant the last two bombs on her broad back, but the Bullet jerked so badly due to the lost aileron, that the bombs widely missed their marks.

Unable to free his hand from the reins, Alec was jerked off balance and swung out over the cliff edge.

Simultaneously Badging jerked, and his elbow knocked an ashtray of the arm of his chair.

He clawed at the bandanna, jerking it up so high he nearly blinded himself.

Hand over hand, not hurriedly so as to avoid jerking Bas and Lugh, he went up, and up.

The hawk bated, wings flapping and thrashing, and Romilly jerked, with a convulsive reflex action, and the strip of raw meat fell into the straw.

I see nothing illusive in the wretchedly bedaubed sheet of canvas that forms your background, or in these pasteboard slips that hitch and jerk along the front.

All seemed to be going well, but as the cart turned the corner out of Bergamot Street, Muirne abruptly jerked bolt upright.

Tram Bir, who was supervising the placement of the tents, stopped them and said something, jerking his thumb toward the caravan.

Staring up at him with eyes still heavy with sleep, she jerked away from his hand, opening her mouth for what Blu assumed would be a blood-curdling scream.

With a quick jerk, Ruark doffed the hat and held it in both hands before him like a bondslave suddenly confronted by his master.

The nozzle jerked loose and tumbled along the bark with Booce wrapped around it.

T-Dub and Chicamaw scraped in sudden violence and Bowie jerked up like a jackknife.

His left Colt bucked and the adversary jerked backwards onto the grass.

Leaping straight up, he looped a leg around it and jerked Buel, the man holding the chain, off his feet.