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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
jeer
verb
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ About 5,000 teachers jeered Gov. Gardner on Friday.
▪ After the match the crowd were all jeering at him.
▪ He was booed and jeered by the spectators when he argued with the umpire.
▪ The boys jeered as she ran away.
▪ The fans jeered as it became obvious that their team was going to lose.
▪ The mayor was jeered and booed as he tried to speak to the crowd.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A crowd ran after them, jeering all the way.
▪ At Houston Street we are jeered by a group of Brooklyn punks.
▪ I could hear Hilda moaning, then the grunts, laughter and jeering of the soldiers.
▪ Nutty got a glimpse of Gloria and Seb, jaws dropping, as everyone started to jeer and clap.
▪ The guests leaned over the rail, jeered, and shouted advice.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Jeer

Jeer \Jeer\, v. t. To treat with scoffs or derision; to address with jeers; to taunt; to flout; to mock at.

And if we can not jeer them, we jeer ourselves.
--B. Jonson.

Jeer

Jeer \Jeer\, n. A railing remark or reflection; a scoff; a taunt; a biting jest; a flout; a jibe; mockery.

Midas, exposed to all their jeers, Had lost his art, and kept his ears.
--Swift.

Jeer

Jeer \Jeer\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Jeered; p. pr. & vb. n. Jeering.] [Perh. a corrup. of cheer to salute with cheers, taken in an ironical sense; or more prob. fr. D. gekscheren to jeer, lit., to shear the fool; gek a fool (see 1st Geck) + scheren to shear. See Shear, v.] To utter sarcastic or scoffing reflections; to speak with mockery or derision; to use taunting language; to scoff; as, to jeer at a speaker.

But when he saw her toy and gibe and jeer.
--Spenser.

Syn: To sneer; scoff; flout; gibe; mock.

Jeer

Jeer \Jeer\, n. [Cf. Gear.] (Naut.)

  1. A gear; a tackle.

  2. pl. An assemblage or combination of tackles, for hoisting or lowering the lower yards of a ship.

    Jeer capstan (Naut.), an extra capstan usually placed between the foremast and mainmast.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
jeer

1550s, gyr, "to deride, to mock," of uncertain origin; perhaps from Dutch gieren "to cry or roar," or German scheren "to plague, vex," literally "to shear." OED finds the suggestion that it is an ironical use of cheer "plausible and phonetically feasible, ... but ... beyond existing evidence." Related: Jeered; jeering.

jeer

1620s, from jeer (v.).

Wiktionary
jeer

Etymology 1 n. A railing remark or reflection; a scoff; a taunt; a biting jest; a flout; a jibe; mockery. vb. (context intransitive jeer '''at''' English) To utter sarcastic or mocking comments; to speak with mockery or derision; to use taunting language. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context nautical English) A gear; a tackle. 2 (context nautical in the plural English) An assemblage or combination of tackles, for hoisting or lowering the yards of a ship.

WordNet
jeer
  1. n. showing your contempt by derision [syn: jeering, mockery, scoff, scoffing]

  2. v. laugh at with contempt and derision; "The crowd jeered at the speaker" [syn: scoff, flout, barrack, gibe]

Usage examples of "jeer".

Of course the sailor brutes started jeering when the atheling shipped his oar, so Radgar arrived at the stern with his face redder than ever.

We saw him minutes later, looking down and beckoning from one of the narrow parapets from which the rock-apes had jeered at us at twilight.

Though the knight was escorted by Captain Bludder and his Alsatian bullies, several of the crowd did not seem disposed to confine themselves to jeers and derisive shouts, but menaced him with some rough usage.

I have known all my life, the falseness in a hearty laugh, the envy and the malice in a jesting word, the naked hatred in a jeering eye, and all the damned, warped, poisonous constrictions of the heart--the horrible fear and cowardice and cruelty, the naked shame, the hypocrisy, and the pretence, that are masked there behind the full hearty tones, the robust manliness of the Hortons of this earth .

Somebody snickered--probably Lou Klock--and all his life, however brave and impassioned before an audience that hated him gravely, Gid would always feel watery in the backs of his knees when anybody jeered.

Progress for the inebriated became a trial of slipped steps and hooked ankles, overseen by jeering, half-naked sailors.

Now, as they carried Asineth in a prison cart through the streets of Inwit, with ten thousand people jeering at her, cursing her though she had never done them harm, she prayed.

Do not let this jeering jingler wither the flame of your dream with his windy words.

It was now for more than the middle span of our allotted years that he had passed through the thousand vicissitudes of existence and, being of a wary ascendancy and self a man of rare forecast, he had enjoined his heart to repress all motions of a rising choler and, by intercepting them with the readiest precaution, foster within his breast that plenitude of sufferance which base minds jeer at, rash judgers scorn and all find tolerable and but tolerable.

The master pilots - usually there are about a hundred or so - gather in front of the Hall of the Ancient Pilots, and, as is their wont, they drink mugs of steaming kvass or other such beverages, all the while slapping shoulders and hands to give each other encouragement while they shout and jeer at the smaller group of new pilots.

The master pilots-usually there are about a hundred or so-gather in front of the Hall of the Ancient Pilots, and, as is their wont, they drink mugs of steaming kvass or other such beverages, all the while slapping shoulders and hands to give each other encouragement while they shout and jeer at the smaller group of new pilots.

Damn the miserable stupidity of the Summers, those jeering, stinking imbeciles who would cheerfully carry out their purge of knowledge.

Of what use is it to dethrone kings and by what right do we jeer at those who die for their masters, if it is only to put tyrannic entities in their places, which we adorn with their tinsel?

He spread his arms and jerked his hips obscenely and my spearmen jeered back, but Valerin ignored their shouted insults.

In a sudden access of fury, aggravated by the jeers with which his fellows greeted his mishap, the savage turned upon his prisoner and would have stuck a knife into him, bound and helpless as he was, had not the werowance interfered.