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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
citron
noun
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Beat eggs and granulated sugar well and add vanilla and citron.
▪ He drank a pastis, she a citron pressé.
▪ In fact you can eat it like an apple, though the citron is most always candied.
▪ Sprinkle mace, cinnamon, dash salt, citron, orange peel, apricots, dates and sugar over yams.
▪ The citron has the most beautiful fragrance of all the citrus fruits and its pith is not bitter.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Citron

Citron \Cit"ron\ (s[i^]t"r[u^]n), n. [F. citron, LL. citro, fr. L. citrus citron tree (cf. citreum, sc. malum, a citron), from Gr. ki`tron citron]

  1. (Bot) A fruit resembling a lemon, but larger, and pleasantly aromatic; it is produced by the citron tree ( Citrus medica). The thick rind, when candied, is the citron of commerce. The fruit was once called the lime.

  2. A citron tree, Citrus medica.

  3. A citron melon. Citron melon.

    1. A small variety of muskmelon with sugary greenish flesh.

    2. A small variety of watermelon, whose solid white flesh is used in making sweetmeats and preserves.

      Citron tree (Bot.), the tree which bears citrons. It was probably a native of northern India, and is now understood to be the typical form of Citrus Medica.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
citron

late 14c., also citrine (early 15c.), from Old French citron "citron, lemon" (14c.), possibly from Old Provençal citron, from Latin citrus and influenced by lemon; or else from augmentative of Latin *citrum, related to citrus "citron tree," citreum (malum) "citron" (see citrus).

Wiktionary
citron

a. Of a greenish yellow colour. n. 1 A greenish yellow colour. 2 A small citrus tree, (taxlink Citrus medica species noshow=1). 3 The fruit of a citron tree. 4 The candied rind of the citron fruit.

WordNet
citron
  1. n. large lemonlike fruit with thick aromatic rind; usually preserved

  2. thorny evergreen small tree or shrub of India widely cultivated for its large lemonlike fruits that have thick warty rind [syn: citron tree, Citrus medica]

Wikipedia
Citron

The citron is a large fragrant citrus fruit with a thick rind, botanically classified as Citrus medica by both the Swingle and Tanaka botanical name systems. It is one of the four original citrus fruits (the others being pomelo, mandarin and papeda), from which most other citrus types developed through natural hybrid speciation or artificial hybridization.

Citron (disambiguation)

Citron is a species of citrus fruit; citron varieties include:

  • Florentine citron
  • Diamante citron from Italy
  • Greek citron
  • Balady citron from Palestine
  • Fingered citron
  • Yemenite citron
Citron (color)

{{infobox color|

title=Citron|textcolor=white|
hex=9FA91F|
r=158|g= 169|b=31 |
c=  6|m=   0|y=82 |k=34 |
h= 64|s=  82|v= 66

source=Xona.com}}

Citron as a tertiary color

Citron is a dark lemon color similar to that of the fruit citron. As a tertiary color on the RYB color wheel, it is an equal mix of orange and green pigments.

Citron (surname)

Citron is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

  • William M. Citron (1896–1976), U.S. Representative from Connecticut
  • Jeffrey A. Citron, chairman of Vonage
  • Michelle Citron, American feminist film, video and multimedia producer, scholar and author
  • Minna Citron (1896–1991), American painter and printmaker
  • Robert Citron (1925–2013), American politician
  • Bob Citron (1932–2012), engineer
  • Neil Citron, guitarist who played briefly with heavy metal band Quiet Riot in 2006
  • Sabina Citron, Holocaust survivor, activist, and author

Usage examples of "citron".

Then there were citrons and wild pomegranates and a score of other arborescent plants, all testifying to the fertility of this plateau of Central Africa.

Citron and Ivory, were richly adorned and spread with cloath of gold, the Cups were garnished pretiously, and there were divers other things of sundry fashion, but of like estimation and price : here stood a glasse gorgeously wrought, there stood another of Christall finely painted.

You pay eighty marks and they plant a dunam of land for you with olives, oranges, almonds or citrons.

China oranges, walnuts and plums, candied Madeiras, citrons and muscadine grapes.

Until the time of pregnancy this mamma was taken for an ordinary nevus, but with pregnancy it began to develop and acquired the size of a citron.

His health remained strong throughout this period, interrupting his three-month burst of creativity only once, in early November, when Suor Maria Celeste and Suor Luisa treated his brief indisposition by sending him five ounces of their vinegary oxymel concoction and some syrup of citron rind to ameliorate its bitter taste.

Almost all the flowers, the herbs, and the fruits, that grow in our European gardens, are of foreign extraction, which, in many cases, is betrayed even by their names: the apple was a native of Italy, and when the Romans had tasted the richer flavor of the apricot, the peach, the pomegranate, the citron, and the orange, they contented themselves with applying to all these new fruits the common denomination of apple, discriminating them from each other by the additional epithet of their country.

Groves of lemon, groves of citron, Tall high-foliaged plane and palm, Bloomy myrtle, light-blue olive, Wave her back with gusts of balm.

A waitress without being asked brought Brose a glass of citron presse which he despatched in a long smooth swallow.

If you write with the juice of Citrons, Oranges, Onyons, or almost any sharp things, if you make it hot at the fire, their acrimony is presently discovered: for they are undigested juices, whereas they are detected by the heat of the fire, and then they show forth those colours that they would show if they were ripe.

There were quinces and lemons and pale mauve citrons, pearl nuts and fanworts and pumpkins of gold.

Citron and Ivory, were richly adorned and spread with cloath of gold, the Cups were garnished pretiously, and there were divers other things of sundry fashion, but of like estimation and price : here stood a glasse gorgeously wrought, there stood another of Christall finely painted.

Groves of lemon, groves of citron, Tall high-foliaged plane and palm, Bloomy myrtle, light-blue olive, Wave her back with gusts of balm.

The governor was a sort of happy farmer, harvesting wines, figs, oil, and oranges, preserving his citrons and cedrats in the sun of his casemates.

Galileo regularly sent the best of the citrons to Suor Maria Celeste, who would seed, soak, dry, and sweeten them over a period of several days to prepare his favorite confection.