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The Collaborative International Dictionary
camus

Camis \Cam"is\ (k[a^]m"[i^]s), n. [See Chemise.] A light, loose dress or robe. [Also written camus.] [Obs.]

All in a camis light of purple silk.
--Spenser.

Wiktionary
camus

n. (obsolete form of camis English)

Wikipedia
Camus

Camus may refer to:

Camus (musician)

Dave Sale is an American singer-songwriter investigative story teller, and film maker who achieved notability as Camus with his now classic "sins of the Father", a release on Atlantic Records. The album includes the song Ouch which was featured on the Baywatch episode 'Out of the Blue' alongside Cyndi Lauper. In this project he had the opportunity to collaborate with Producers David Kahne and Kevin Killin. Sale is a direct descendant of the last Dutch governor of New Amsterdam, Peter Stuyvesant. Sale has been called "the Bob Dylan for the junque generation".

Camús
Camus (folklore)

Camus, in historic literature, was a Scandinavian general dispatched to engage the Scots in battle, reportedly in the early eleventh century AD. The legendary engagement was called the Battle of Barry, and was first alluded to by Boece.

The historical nature of Camus and the Battle of Barry was called into doubt in the early nineteenth century. Evidence formerly cited for the battle included the large number of human remains found on Barry Links, where the town of Carnoustie, Angus now stands, now reinterpreted as a Pictish cemetery of earlier date. The remains of a fort near Kirkbuddo, formerly known as 'Norway Dykes', from where the Danish army are supposed to have marched is now recognised to be of Roman origin.

Boece attributed Pictish sculptured stones found throughout Angus and the surrounding area to the Danish invasions. The battle depicted on the reverse of the Aberlemno kirkyard stone was cited by tradition as a depiction of the Battle of Barry. Current thought dates this stone from the mid-8th century and it is now commonly thought to depict the Battle of Dun Nechtain in 685 AD. The Camus Cross near Monikie, 2 miles north of the supposed battle site and formerly thought to be the site of Camus' death, is now thought to be of earlier, Pictish origin.

The name 'Camus' derives from 'Camuston', the location of the Camus Cross. Local tradition claims the hill to have been named in honour of Camus, but it is found in early documents as 'Cambeston' and is thought to have a Celtic rather than Scandinavian derivation.

Camus (surname)

Camus is a given name, stage name, and given name. Notable people named Camus include:

Usage examples of "camus".

Benardy, Berryer, de Berset, Basse, Betting de Lancastel, Blavoyer, Bocher, Boissie, de Botmillan, Bouvatier, le Duc de Broglie, de la Broise, de Bryas, Buffet, Caillet du Tertre, Callet, Camus de la Guibourgere, Canet, de Castillon, de Cazalis, Admiral Cecile, Chambolle, Chamiot, Champannet, Chaper, Chapot, de Charencey, Chasseigne, Chauvin, Chazant, de Chazelles, Chegaray, Comte de Coislin, Colfavru, Colas de la Motte, Coquerel, de Corcelles, Cordier, Corne, Creton, Daguilhon, Pujol, Dahirel, Vicomte Dambray, Marquis de Dampierre, de Brotonne, de Fontaine, de Fontenay, Vicomte de Seze, Desmars, de la Devansaye, Didier, Dieuleveult, Druet-Desvaux, A.

Yet Camus modeled Meursault on himself in certain respects, giving the fictional hero his own love of the sun and the sea, his easy charm with women, and his macho attitudes.

In particular, Girard thought that Camus had come to recognize Meursault as more responsible than he implied in the 1955 foreword, and at the same time to have more sympathy for the lawyers and judges, since he realized that he was one himself.

Camus, through the voice of Meursault, provides a great deal of precise information about each of the major events.

At that word, Cami choked on her food, and shook a finger at the dwarves.

Paks was startled to see the Training Master grab Cami by both shoulders and hug her.

But as she watched Cami move a tray out of her way and settle onto the table, the Training Master touched her shoulder, and beckoned.

After the events of the day before, Paks had hoped to get Cami as her sponsor, but instead Amberion led her before the crowd.

At his nod, Cami suddenly seemed to catch fire, wreathed in a white radiance too bright to watch.

What for Cami had been joyous and exhilarating gifts were to Alasen things to flee from as fast as she could.

Following a tender scene between Thomas and Giulielma in which he pleads with her to accompany him north, a fall from a horse leads somewhat inexplicably into a heated discussion of justice between Thomas, William and Mr Kane employing patches of Platonic dialogue lifted directly from Book I of the Republic, interspersed with unattributed views of Albert Camus on total justice and of Rousseau on absolute freedom, and Thomas departs.

Bechard, Behaghel, de Belevze, Benoist-d'Azy, de Benardy, Berryer, de Berset, Basse, Betting de Lancastel, Blavoyer, Bocher, Boissie, de Botmillan, Bouvatier, le Duc de Broglie, de la Broise, de Bryas, Buffet, Caillet du Tertre, Callet, Camus de la Guibourgere, Canet, de Castillon, de Cazalis, Admiral Cecile, Chambolle, Chamiot, Champannet, Chaper, Chapot, de Charencey, Chasseigne, Chauvin, Chazant, de Chazelles, Chegaray, Comte de Coislin, Colfavru, Colas de la Motte, Coquerel, de Corcelles, Cordier, Corne, Creton, Daguilhon, Pujol, Dahirel, Vicomte Dambray, Marquis de Dampierre, de Brotonne, de Fontaine, de Fontenay, Vicomte de Seze, Desmars, de la Devansaye, Didier, Dieuleveult, Druet-Desvaux, A.

It's a thimbleful compared to what I would have swallowed if you and Cami hadn't thought so fast.

Reluctance in every line of her, Cami left the room and closed the door behind her.

You may be able to fool Cami and Ostvel, and perhaps even Andrade, with this nonsense about not being sure.