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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
ad
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
ad hoc committee/group etc
ad hoc
▪ decisions made on an ad hoc basis
ad infinitum
▪ I have to explain A, then B, and C, and so on ad infinitum.
ad nauseam
▪ Look, we’ve been over this ad nauseam. I think we should move on to the next item.
banner ad
classified ad
on an ad hoc basis
▪ decisions made on an ad hoc basis
personal ad
small ad
teaser ad
want ad
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
classified
▪ A couple who watch the classified ads can make some outstanding furniture buys.
negative
▪ Alexander, who was sharply critical of Forbes' negative ads, appeared to benefit from running a positive campaign.
new
▪ The new ads are timed to hit the airwaves as the stores complete the merchandise makeover, Cohen said.
personal
▪ Newspaper publishers with on-line services have already found a successful niche: the personal ads.
▪ The problem with personal ads is that they never work.
political
▪ Slick political ads play on a giant screen.
▪ His campaign spent millions on political ads in California, cutting back on the number shown in other key states.
small
▪ By now, probably half the small ads in the current issue had been placed by aliens.
▪ MI6 placed a small ad in a newspaper to retrieve a laptop containing state secrets after it was lost by an agent.
■ NOUN
agency
▪ Equal numbers have congratulated the ad agency for reviving memories of the thrill of discovering a baby is on the way.
▪ Then, with the advent of ad agencies, the adverts themselves became commodities.
▪ Y., which works mainly for ad agencies and is following a Nielsen-like model of audience measurement through random sampling.
▪ Now, with up to 60 seconds of trailers, advertisers and ad agencies are beginning to get angry.
▪ The living was easy, and based in a squat, since Williams had abandoned his ad agency.
▪ The cost to the ad agencies ranges from 40 to $ 2 per thousand viewers.
attack
▪ Instead, Merrill has played a major role in urging more and stronger attack ads, according to campaign officials.
▪ In the 30-second spot, the first attack ad of his campaign, Buchanan accuses competitors Dole, Sen.
▪ But ironically, Forbes' attack ads backfired.
banner
▪ Part of the screen was taken up by a banner ad for TotalNews sponsor NewsPage, a personalized Internet news service.
▪ That banner ad obscured an ad on the Time site for PointCast, which competes with NewsPage.
campaign
▪ Between them they looked like the stars of a Reagan campaign ad.
▪ Last time we checked, the press had an obligation to examine the claims made in campaign ads.
guardian
▪ Where the court has appointed a solicitor the guardian ad litem may apply for termination of his appointment.
▪ Karen Davies, solicitor, for the guardian ad litem.
▪ In practice, social work records where relevant are likely to be introduced into the proceedings via the guardian ad litem.
▪ A guardian ad litem appointed in emergency protection proceedings will usually continue to act in any care proceedings which follow.
▪ William Helfrecht for the guardian ad litem.
▪ Meanwhile, the guardian ad litem appointed on behalf of the children was preparing her report.
▪ Where a guardian ad litem has been appointed the solicitor must take instructions from the guardian.
▪ Robin Barda for the minors' guardian ad litem.
litem
▪ Where the court has appointed a solicitor the guardian ad litem may apply for termination of his appointment.
▪ Karen Davies, solicitor, for the guardian ad litem.
▪ In practice, social work records where relevant are likely to be introduced into the proceedings via the guardian ad litem.
▪ A guardian ad litem appointed in emergency protection proceedings will usually continue to act in any care proceedings which follow.
▪ William Helfrecht for the guardian ad litem.
▪ Meanwhile, the guardian ad litem appointed on behalf of the children was preparing her report.
▪ The fourth defendant, T., who was unconscious, was represented by the Official Solicitor as guardian ad litem.
newspaper
▪ Bariatric surgeons use television and newspaper ads, 800 numbers, telemarketers, and sophisticated marketing techniques to target potential patients.
▪ The bipartisan Concord Coalition, a Washington-based interest group on budget balancing issues, has run newspaper ads against the Dole plan.
▪ The newspaper ad featured a shepherd and his flock on some remote moor.
▪ Check libraries, newspaper ads and the World Wide Web to see what kinds of careers are out there.
▪ Write a classified newspaper ad, or post a note on a computer bulletin board, offering to give the computer away.
▪ Human travel agents, paper guidebooks and newspaper ads still have a lot going for them.
radio
▪ At the news conference, Bennett played the radio ads along with excerpts from the rap music in question.
▪ He has aired radio ads in Iowa, whose caucuses are a mere three years away.
▪ Recently, Peapod has started a marketing campaign with bus posters and radio ads.
▪ It could not have been more appropriate that radio ads started appearing in Ebony in the late I940s.
▪ The program includes brochures, direct mail, television and radio ads, utility bill inserts and the live-operator call center.
▪ Kolender, in television and radio ads, uses pigeons flying out of an open cage to parody the jail system.
revenue
▪ Annual ad revenue is more than $ 150 million.
▪ Forbes leads Fortune in circulation and ad revenue, a status that has developed only since Steve Forbes took over.
▪ Pharmaceutical ad revenue is expected to soar 300 percent in 1997.
television
▪ It is encouraging that Gore's television ads have not trimmed to the right.
▪ The campaign believes the best way to reach independents is through more television ads.
▪ Now, in the television ads, he cheerfully delivered some hammy lines before falling backwards into a swimming pool.
▪ In speeches and television ads, Gov.
▪ Spafford Hutchinson, a computer analyst, had heard the television ads of Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes.
▪ Both sides have spent heavily on newspaper and television ads.
▪ We have seen the honest faces of the hometown insurance representative on television ads, face after face, year after year.
▪ One television ad featured a live chicken to convey the message: Stop being one; start investing.
tobacco
▪ How does Health Secretary Virginia Bottomley hope to achieve a ten percent reduction in smokers without a ban on tobacco ads?
▪ A ban on tobacco ads aimed at the young.
want
▪ Yesterday, he had written Helen a letter asking her to send the want ads from the Atkinson Crier.
■ VERB
answer
▪ It all started, she recalls, when Anna answered an ad at the Job Centre for a magician's assistant.
▪ As a renter you might feel deceived if you answered the ad.
▪ When I first answered the ad in the paper and said I was a widow, that was different.
▪ Frank answered my ad in the Voice.
▪ You answer an ad in a frenzy of lust and loneliness.
▪ Forget the stereotype of the naive female student who answers an ad and ends up on the streets.
▪ But he's still optimistic that whoever answers the ad, will bring romance as well as adventure into his life.
appear
▪ I don't care if he appeared in the ad in return for a donation to the Terrence Higgins Trust.
▪ They appear in health club ads, fit, trim and tanned, with impossibly taut abdomens.
classify
▪ But other Microsoft Internet initiatives include putting automotive and real estate classified ads on-line.
▪ Write a classified newspaper ad, or post a note on a computer bulletin board, offering to give the computer away.
▪ He said Sidewalk has no plans to include classified ads in its menu of offerings.
▪ Acronyms increasingly are being created not only to communicate quickly but cheaply, especially in classified ads.
▪ You can also find used scooters in the classified ads and Web pages run by Vespa clubs.
▪ Graham took classified ads over the telephone and learned what hard work it was.
pay
▪ The money paid for ads and an anti-Foley car parade that had over 150 vehicles.
▪ So the fund management companies, not the mutual-fund shareholders, are paying for the ads, fund officials said.
▪ They pay for the ads that keep obesity journals publishing.
place
▪ MI6 placed a small ad in a newspaper to retrieve a laptop containing state secrets after it was lost by an agent.
▪ Following requests from the bomber, police placed ads in the Daily Telegraph newspaper trying, unsuccessfully, to open communications.
▪ He started in the 1970s by placing a free ad in Yankee magazine, inquiring about old road maps.
▪ Mendoza recalls the time when a limousine driver called and asked to place an ad.
▪ A third option is to place their own ad in the restroom.
▪ As soon as they arrived in Tokyo, my father and his colleagues placed ads for missing persons through the Red Cross.
produce
▪ Advertising strategies: The Disney Studio produces the oddest combo ads in the business.
put
▪ Let's hope some of our little fire raisers don't manage to get there and put the ad into practice.
▪ Alderman Marzullo puts out a 350-page ad book every year, at one hundred dollars a page.
▪ One day he puts this PersonaIs ad on her desk.
▪ She does not work the streets, but puts ads in newspapers and leaves cards in London telephone boxes.
▪ They put an ad in the paper for people to be the cowboy, the construction worker and the biker.
▪ The panelists were put off by numerous ads promising a balanced federal budget but offering no specifics on how to achieve it.
read
▪ The next step is to read the ads.
▪ Well, said Malcolm, did you read the ad?
▪ I left the house and bought newspapers and stopped on the sidewalk to read through the ads for vacant rooms.
▪ He gets depressed when he reads computer ads describing models that are two-thirds again as fast as his but cost one-third less.
run
▪ Publishers hate to run ads, with few exceptions.
▪ The daily paper ran job ads.
▪ The bipartisan Concord Coalition, a Washington-based interest group on budget balancing issues, has run newspaper ads against the Dole plan.
▪ For years now this newspaper has run ads for topless and who-knows-what-else entertainment facilities around town.
▪ Now, of course, Merrill Lynch is merely trying to confuse members of Congress by running these ads.
▪ Reflecting this practice, aviation magazines ran as many ads for pieces of planes as for whole ones.
▪ I say run ads in magazines that already attract the customer you are looking for and ask for catalog requests.
▪ Dole may receive some help from the national Republican Party, which is already planning to run ads criticizing Clinton administration policies.
see
▪ You rarely see a direct response ad which does not put a clear offer - and the price - in its headline.
▪ They were Rosicrucians, though not, says Craig Fouassis, the sort one sees ads for in pulp magazines.
▪ And then we bought a copy of the New Musical Express and saw a little ad that went with it.
▪ And 81 percent said they have seen Forbes' ads on television.
▪ If you see an ad which makes you really stop and take notice, some one has succeeded in getting through to you.
▪ He saw those ads while attending Vanderbilt University.
▪ Then in January 1991 I saw Roslin's ad in Nature.
▪ The company estimates 50, 000 golfers will see each ad annually.
sell
▪ It was selling ads, but it was a start, and things moved rapidly.
▪ Until recently, Simonson, 45, sold ads in New York.
▪ Ford may offset some of its costs by selling ads to run on the Internet service its employees will use.
▪ You muddle through, reduced to selling your own ads to make a decent buck.
▪ As yet, though, the company has not sold any ads, he said.
▪ The company only started selling ads in February, while other companies started last fall.
▪ The second-tier national shows make their money by selling ads with rates based on how many stations they appear on.
show
▪ There are already plans to make the £26,000 jingle into a hit single and show the ad in cinemas.
▪ Yet, if you show people the ad, they will tell you just the things that the strategy was looking for.
▪ Scott Williams will show you some ads later on.
▪ The electric advertising board has three-sided vertical panels, endlessly rotating to show repeating ads.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
lonely hearts club/column/ad
▪ He met Dominique through a lonely hearts ad.
▪ How would you describe yourself in a lonely hearts ad?
▪ They talked about books, the theatre, cinema, where they lived, lonely hearts columns.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ an ad campaign
▪ I saw an advert for some cheap furniture in our local paper.
▪ She had started her acting career by doing shampoo ads on TV.
▪ We put an ad in 'The Times' and got a terrific response.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He finds that job ads placed in prominent papers like the Financial Times serve him well.
▪ Homeless children scrounge for spare change, and newspapers carry ads from people offering their kidneys for cash.
▪ Is this ad for Absolut Vodka for real?
▪ Look for what is not included in the main body of the ad.
▪ The campaign believes the best way to reach independents is through more television ads.
▪ This will spark rounds of attack and counterattack ads.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
ad

1841, shortened form of advertisement. Long resisted by those in the trade, and according to Mencken (1945) denounced by William C. D'Arcy (president of Associated Advertising Clubs of the World) as "the language of bootblacks, ... beneath the dignity of men of the advertising profession."

Wiktionary
ad

Etymology 1 n. (context informal English) advertisement. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context tennis English) advantage 2 (context debating English) advantage Etymology 3

prep. to, toward

WordNet
ad

n. a public promotion of some product or service [syn: advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert]

Wikipedia
AD (disambiguation)

An ad ( advertisement) is a form of marketing communication.

AD (Anno Domini) is a designation used to label years following 1 BC in the Julian and Gregorian calendars.

  • Anno Diocletiani, an alternative year numbering system

AD, A.D. or Ad may also refer to:

AD (band)

AD is a 1980s Christian rock band, featuring former Kansas members Kerry Livgren ( guitar, keyboard) and Dave Hope ( bass), former Bloodrock member Warren Ham ( lead vocals, saxophone, flute, harmonica), who had toured as a sideman with Kansas in 1982, Michael Gleason ( lead vocals), and Dennis Holt ( drums).

Ad (name)

Ad is a first name. It is common in the Netherlands, where it is almost always short for Adrianus or Adriaan. In America it can be short for Adolph, Addison, and others. People with the first name of Ad include:

  • Ad van der Avoird (born 1943), Dutch chemist
  • Ad Bax (born 1956), Dutch-American biophysicist
  • Ad de Boer (born 1946), Dutch politician
  • Ad Brennan (1887–1962), American baseball pitcher
  • Ad Carter (1895–1957), American cartoonist (Ad stands for "August Daniel")
  • Ad Donker (1933–2002), Dutch-South African publisher
  • Ad Gumbert (1868–1925), American baseball pitcher
  • Ad Kaland (1922–1995), Dutch politician
  • Ad van Kempen (born 1944), Dutch actor
  • Ad Kolnaar (born 1942), Dutch economist
  • Ad Konings (born 1956), Dutch ichthyologist
  • Ad Koppejan (born 1962), Dutch politician
  • Ad Lagendijk (born 1947), Dutch physicist
  • Ad van Liempt (born 1949), Dutch journalist
  • Ad Liska (1906–1998), American baseball pitcher
  • Ad van Luyn (born 1935), Dutch Roman Catholic bishop
  • Ad Melkert (born 1956), Dutch politician
  • Ad Moolhuijzen (born 1943), Dutch water polo player
  • Ad Neeleman (born 1964), Dutch-British linguist
  • Ad Reinhardt (1913–1967), American abstract painter
  • Ad Rutschman (born 1931), American football and baseball coach
  • Ad Santel (1887–1966), American professional wrestler
  • Ad Simonis (born 1931), Dutch Roman Catholic cardinal
  • Ad Sluijter (born 1981), Dutch guitarist
  • Ad Snijders (1929–2010), Dutch painter
  • Ad van der Steur (1893–1953), Dutch architect
  • Ad Swigler (1895–1975), American baseball pitcher
  • Ad Tak (born 1953), Dutch bicycle racer
  • Ad van Tiggelen (born 1958), Dutch banker and fantasy writer
  • Ad Vandenberg (born 1954), Dutch rock guitarist
  • Ad Wenke (1898–1961), American football player and justice
  • Ad Wijnands (born 1959), Dutch bicycle racer
  • Ad Wolgast (1888–1955), American boxer
  • Ad Yale (1870–1948), American baseball player

Usage examples of "ad".

I suggested that people ignore the Panadol ads because they could buy store-brand acetaminophen for half as much.

Information is crammed together-ads butting up to other ads with no editorial relief In every other conceivable media environment, advertising is interrupted by other information.

Those who support transfer from Polynesia point to the fact that they can find no evidence for the sweet potato on Rapa Nui before 1600 AD, but surely this is not entirely fair, given that ipomoea batatas does not preserve well in sediment.

Like many Americans, therefore, teenagers respond to ads not just by buying things but by making them a part of their own lives.

The rest, including Clocker, waited as an aging man in a white lab smock, heavy-rimmed eyeglasses and smooth pink cheeks, looking like a benevolent doctor in a mouthwash ad, stood up and faced the crowd.

Bengali image of the goddess Tara now in the Dacca Museum and datable to the early second millennium AD.

Happy to have a congenial companion, Dinny worked on the ads all afternoon and early evening.

Bill Dumpty has resorted to negative campaign ads filled with lies and distortions and subliminal messages urging children to have sex.

But the fair, unbiased, objective media were outraged at the Bush campaign for running ads on the furlough of Willie Horton.

Riding a crest of public disaffection not seen since the days Jif commercials had strangers shoving their shiny noses in your open jar, the Malone-Turner-and-shadowy-Albertan-led cable kabal got sponsors whose ads had been running as distant as seven or eight spots on either side of the NoCoat gaggers to jump ship to A.

Most seemed to be generalists, judging from their full-page ads, which trumpeted crowns, dentures, fillings, periodontal work, bridges, root canals, cosmetic dentistry, and oral surgery.

In front of them in turn, Hyrald and Adren stood either side of Rhavvan.

Rhavvan mounted, dragging the injured and protesting Warden unceremoniously across his saddle, while Hyrald and Nordath took the other two horses with Adren and Thyrn.

Like every other drugstore on earth, it is filled with quack products that remind me of nineteenth-century ads for hair restorers and innervating elixirs.

The cause was a noble one, said Paul, worthy of very serious thought, and his ad- miration for Henrietta as its guiding light was total.