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Answer for the clue "Order from the top ", 6 letters:
decree

Alternative clues for the word decree

Word definitions for decree in dictionaries

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Word definitions in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
I. noun COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES decree absolute decree nisi rule by decree (= make all the important decisions himself ) ▪ He announced that henceforth he would rule by decree . COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS ■ ADJECTIVE new ▪ King John forbade the clergy...

The Collaborative International Dictionary Word definitions in The Collaborative International Dictionary
Decree \De*cree"\, v. i. To make decrees; -- used absolutely. Father eternal! thine is to decree; Mine, both in heaven and earth to do thy will. --Milton.

Wiktionary Word definitions in Wiktionary
n. 1 An edict or law. 2 (context legal English) The judicial decision in a litigated cause rendered by a court of equity. 3 (context legal English) The determination of a cause in a court of admiralty or court of probate. vb. To command by a decree.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary Word definitions in Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
early 14c., from Old French decre , variant of decret (12c., Modern French décret ), from Latin decretum , neuter of decretus , past participle of decernere "to decree, decide, pronounce a decision," from de- (see de- ) + cernere "to separate" (see crisis...

WordNet Word definitions in WordNet
v. issue a decree; "The King only can decree" decide with authority; "The King decreed that all first-born males should be killed" [syn: rule ]

Wikipedia Word definitions in Wikipedia
A decree is a rule of law usually issued by a head of state (such as the president of a republic or a monarch ), according to certain procedures (usually established in a constitution). It has the force of law. The particular term used for this concept...

Usage examples of decree.

Each in my world, it seemed, carried about with him a bubble of space, a perimeter, a wall, an invisible shield, an unconsciously acculturated, socially sanctioned remoteness, a barrier decreed by convention and conditioning.

To make matters worse, Adams learned of further French seizures of American ships in the Caribbean and that by decrees issued in Paris, the Directory had, in effect, launched an undeclared war on American shipping everywhere.

Loreley had decreed to attract a soul thither, or Amphion, the enchanter, intended there to build a city.

Did I not decree that they be known as my Ansar, my helpers and partisans?

It was decreed that the faith and devotion of the Ansar should be rewarded.

They appeared to have patiently expected, and submissively obeyed, the decree of the senate which regulated the succession to the throne.

Finding the Governor absent from Asuncion and lying under a decree suspending him from all his functions, it seems at once to have occurred to Antequera to seize his place.

But Nadar had decreed that both balloons should depart together, and had installed an extra windlass of rope for that purpose, reasoning that a dual launch would confuse and make even more ineffectual the rifle fire from the enemy lines.

The nursery of our greatest dramatists must be looked for, not, it is true, in the transfigured bear-gardens of the Bankside, but in those enchanted taverns, islanded and bastioned by the protective decree - IDIOTA, INSULSUS, TRISTIS, TURPIS, ABESTO.

He was also conscious that rank gave him the freedom to leave the battle line, except that the responsibility of command perversely decreed that he could not take that voluntary backward step.

After all, he was at least a little bit of a mage, as well as a certified bonesetter and herb-Healer, and Selenay of Valdemar had decreed that Valdemar still needed mages.

Although they are partly followers of Bramah and Pythagoras, they do not believe in the transmigration of souls, except in some cases, by a distinct decree of God.

The decree, the preamble of which Carnot insisted upon writing from my dictation, was drawn up in these terms.

Over the end of the year, the two mathematicians, Casanova and Opiz, at the request of Count Waldstein, made a scientific examination of the reform of the calendar as decreed the 5th October 1793 by the National Convention.

My contact tells me that he can find no Chadian statutes, decrees, or court decisions that deal with found property.