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Answer for the clue "Coagulating protein ", 6 letters:
fibrin

Alternative clues for the word fibrin

Word definitions for fibrin in dictionaries

The Collaborative International Dictionary Word definitions in The Collaborative International Dictionary
Fibrin \Fi"brin\, n. [Cf. F. fibrine. See Fiber .] (Physiol. Chem.) A white, albuminous, fibrous substance, formed in the coagulation of the blood either by decomposition of fibrinogen, or from the union of fibrinogen and paraglobulin which exist separately ...

Wiktionary Word definitions in Wiktionary
n. 1 A white, albuminous, fibrous substance, formed in the coagulation of the blood. 2 An elastic, insoluble, whitish protein produced by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen and forming an interlacing fibrous network in the coagulation of blood. 3 An albuminous ...

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary Word definitions in Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
blood-clotting substance, 1800, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber ) + chemical suffix -in (2). So called because it is deposited as a network of fibers that cause the blood to clot.

Wikipedia Word definitions in Wikipedia
Fibrin (also called Factor Ia ) is a fibrous , non-globular protein involved in the clotting of blood. It is formed by the action of the protease thrombin on fibrinogen which causes it to polymerize . The polymerized fibrin together with platelets forms ...

WordNet Word definitions in WordNet
n. a white insoluble fibrous protein formed by the action of thrombin on fibrinogen when blood clots; it forms a network that traps red cells and platelets

Usage examples of fibrin.

The secretion, as we have seen, completely dissolves albumen, muscle, fibrin, areolar tissue, cartilage, the fibrous basis of bone, gelatine, chondrin, casein in the state in which it exists in milk, and gluten which has been subjected to weak hydrochloric acid.

We have also seen that butyric acid, which is much more efficacious than propionic or valerianic acids, digests with pepsin at the higher temperature less than a third of the fibrin which is digested at the same temperature by hydrochloric acid.

The secretion in this state has the power of quickly dissolving, that is of digesting, the muscles of insects, meat, cartilage, albumen, fibrin, gelatine, and casein as it exists in the curds of milk.

Suppose no mercury is found in the dialyzed fluid, owing to the fact that corrosive sublimate enters into insoluble compounds with albumin, fibrin, mucous membrane, gluten, tannic acid, etc.

My son Francis prepared some artificial gastric juice, which was proved efficient by quickly dissolving fibrin, and suspended portions of the fibrocartilage in it.

By this means the blood-making organs rapidly improve in their activity and functions, the blood becomes rich in corpuscles and fibrin, thus strengthening the walls of the blood-vessels and tending to prevent a hemorrhage following undue excitement or injury.

Thus a deficiency of this tissue-salt causes fibrin to become nonfunctional, and to be thrown off in the form of thick, white discharges, giving rise to catarrhs and similar symptoms affecting the skin and mucous membrane.

From these experiments it is clear that the secretion completely dissolves pure fibrin.

The secretion, as we have seen, completely dissolves albumen, muscle, fibrin, areolar tissue, cartilage, the fibrous basis of bone, gelatine, chondrin, casein in the state in which it exists in milk, and gluten which has been subjected to weak hydrochloric acid.

This substance, therefore, like fibrin, excites the leaves for only a short time.

Sanderson, who on subjecting it to artificial gastric juice found that in 1 hr. some was dissolved, but only in the proportion of 23 to 100 of fibrin during the same time.

As the fibrin was pure, and had been well washed in distilled water after being kept in glycerine, and as the cartilage had been soaked in water, I suspect that these substances must [page 337] have been slightly acted on and rendered soluble within the above stated short periods.

Sanderson has no doubt longer than on gelatine, and it would be hardly rash to predict, judging from the effects on Drosera, that albumen would be found more nutritious than fibrin.

Thin portions, about 1/10 of an inch square, were placed on several leaves, and though the fibrin was soon liquefied, the whole was never dissolved.

Into each, a quantity of unboiled fibrin was introduced, and the whole allowed to stand for four hours, the temperature being maintained during the whole time, and care being taken that each contained throughout an excess of fibrin.