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Answer for the clue "The monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause ", 12 letters:
menstruation

Word definitions for menstruation in dictionaries

Wikipedia Word definitions in Wikipedia
Menstruation , also known as a period or monthly , is the regular discharge of blood and mucosal tissue from the inner lining of the uterus through the vagina . Up to 80% of women report having some symptoms prior to menstruation. Common signs and symptoms ...

The Collaborative International Dictionary Word definitions in The Collaborative International Dictionary
Menstruation \Men`stru*a"tion\, n. The discharge of the menses; also, the state or the period of menstruating.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary Word definitions in Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
1680s, from Late Latin menstruare , from menstruus "monthly" (see menstrual ) + -ation . Old English equivalent was monaĆ°blot "month-blood." Middle English had menstrue (n.), late 14c., from Old French menstrue , from Latin menstruum .

WordNet Word definitions in WordNet
n. the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause; "the women were sickly and subject to excessive menstruation"; "a woman does not take the gout unless her menses be stopped"--Hippocrates; "the semen begins ...

Wiktionary Word definitions in Wiktionary
n. The periodic discharging of the menses, the flow of blood and cells from the lining of the uterus in females of humans and other primates.

Usage examples of menstruation.

Liebreich found examples of retinal hemorrhage in suppressed menstruation, and Sir James Paget says that he has seen a young girl at Moorfields who had a small effusion of blood into the anterior chamber of the eye at the menstrual period, which became absorbed during the intervals of menstruation.

The constipated condition of the bowels, often leads to congestion of the uterus and leucorrhea, followed by uterine debility, prolapsus, excessive menstruation, anteversion or retroversion of that organ.

Menstruation, or the menses, monthly visitation, catamenia, menstrual flow, courses, or periods, usually makes its appearance in the female between the twelfth and fifteenth years, at which time the reproductive system undergoes remarkable changes.

In a London discussion there was mentioned the case of a healthy woman of fifty who never was pregnant, and whose menstruation had ceased two years previously, but who for twelve months had menstruated regularly from the nipples, the hemorrhage being so profuse as to require constant change of napkins.

Emmet cites an instance of menstruation at seventy, and Brierre de Boismont one of a woman who menstruated regularly from her twenty-fourth year to the time of her death at ninety-two.

There is recorded an inexplicable case of menstruation from the region of the sternum, and among the curious anomalies of menstruation must be mentioned that reported by Parvin seen in a woman, who, at the menstrual epoch, suffered hemoptysis and oozing of blood from the lips and tongue.

Cases of semimonthly menstruation and many similar anomalies of periodicity are spoken of.

Mackenzie cites the instance of a woman aged thirty-two, a primipara, who had been married ten years and who always had been regular in menstruation.

It also aids nutrition, and thus tones up the general system, so that in the form of profuse menstruation, resulting from debility, the patient is strengthened, her blood enriched, and her nervousness quieted, which constitutes the necessary treatment to make the cure permanent.

Among others, deranged menstruation, prolonged nursing of children, pregnancy, abortions, excessive indulgence in sexual intercourse, uncleanliness, piles, uterine ulcers, and displacement of the womb, are the most common.

There is recorded an inexplicable case of menstruation from the region of the sternum, and among the curious anomalies of menstruation must be mentioned that reported by Parvin seen in a woman, who, at the menstrual epoch, suffered hemoptysis and oozing of blood from the lips and tongue.

The antigay passage rubs shoulders with passages condemning masturbation, or sex during menstruation.

The coexistence of a floating kidney in this case may have been responsible for this hemorrhage, and in reading reports of so-called menstruation due consideration must be given to the existence of any other than menstrual derangement before we can accept the cases as true vicarious hemorrhage.

Storer, Clay, Tait, and the British and Foreign Medico-Chirurgical Review report cases in which menstruation took place with neither uterus nor ovary.

Menstruation after hysterectomy and ovariotomy has been attributed to the incomplete removal of the organs in question, yet upon postmortem examination of some cases no vestige of the functional organs in question has been found.