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Answer for the clue "A tropical tree or shrub bearing fruit that germinates while still on the tree and having numerous prop roots that eventually form an impenetrable mass and are important in land building", 8 letters:
mangrove

Alternative clues for the word mangrove

Everglades evergreen

Word definitions for mangrove in dictionaries

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Word definitions in Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
noun COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS ■ NOUN forest ▪ The mangrove forest in the region has already been reduced by half. ▪ Chokoria Sunderban, an 18,000-hectare mangrove forest in Cox's Bazar, has been totally destroyed. ▪ There are the giant mangrove forests...

The Collaborative International Dictionary Word definitions in The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mangrove \Man"grove\, n. [Malay manggi-manggi.] (Bot.) The name of one or two trees of the genus Rhizophora ( Rhizophora Mangle , and Rhizophora mucronata , the last doubtfully distinct) inhabiting muddy shores of tropical regions, where they spread by...

Wiktionary Word definitions in Wiktionary
n. 1 Any of various tropical evergreen trees or shrubs that grow in shallow coastal water. 2 A habitat with such plants; mangrove forest; mangrove swamp. 3 Plants of the Rhizophoraceae family. 4 Trees of the genus ''Rhizophora''.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary Word definitions in Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
1610s, mangrow , probably from Spanish mangle, mangue (1530s), which is perhaps from Carib or Arawakan. Modern spelling in English (1690s) is from influence of grove . A Malay origin also has been proposed, but it is difficult to explain how it came to...

WordNet Word definitions in WordNet
n. a tropical tree or shrub bearing fruit that germinates while still on the tree and having numerous prop roots that eventually form an impenetrable mass and are important in land building [syn: Rhizophora mangle ]

Wikipedia Word definitions in Wikipedia
Mangroves are shrubs or small trees that grow in coastal saline or brackish water . The term is also used for tropical coastal vegetation consisting of such species. Mangroves occur worldwide in the tropics and subtropics , mainly between latitudes ° N...

Usage examples of mangrove.

There was usually about a foot of space between the lowermost branches and the mangrove swamp mud.

Horst men stopped shooting and throwing hand grenades into the mangrove creek.

Horst men seized Ham Brooks and drawly old Tex Haven, flung them into the dinghies, and rowed back down the mangrove creek.

Enough of a breeze was blowing to rasp mangrove boughs together occasionally, a sound somewhat as if skeletons were being moved about.

Monk slipped off a mangrove stem, landed on his head in mud which was semiliquld and about three feet deep.

From there the pewter water spreads away to the black walls of mangrove on all sides.

Little Thelma runs to the crumpled bucket of black mangrove charcoal damped with earth.

Picks up his spyglass and looks straight into the mangrove like he sees something in there besides mangrove, then keeps right on a-coming like he never heard me.

This rainy and mosquito-ridden labyrinth of mangrove islands and dark tidal rivers was all but uninhabited, despite the marvelous abundance of its fish and game.

Me and the niggers hoeing weeds was stunned by the weight of that white sky that sank so low over the mangrove in the summer, but Mister Watson was singing his old songs.

Watson looked contented, calling her children to see the dolphins that slipped across the bow, and the gray-green waves sliding ashore onto bright beaches, and the green walls of mangrove with no sign of human kind, and the towers of white clouds over the Glades.

Henry Thompson and me tied up to a mangrove and baited us some snappers while we compared our lowdown on that posse.

Bill Collier was digging garden muck for his tomatoes from a little mangrove swamp between shell ridges, just down the Caxambas trail from his Marco property, when his spade come up with some Indin war clubs, cordage, and a conch-shell dipper, and some peculiar kind of old wood carving.

Injuns and cottonmouths and giant gators, and anyways, there was nowhere to run to, nothing but mangrove and deep-water rivers, miles from anywhere.

He was still tangled when some men from Marco, stopping by on their way north from Key West, found him hooked by his trousers in the mangrove at low tide, with his nose-warmer washed up alongside him.