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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
rank
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a taxi rankBritish English, a taxi stand American English (= a place where taxis wait for customers)
▪ There's a taxi rank just outside the hotel.
cab rank
high rank
▪ a high rank in the US Navy
massed ranks/forces
▪ I look around me at the massed ranks of reporters.
rank alongside (=be equal to)
▪ Athletics should rank alongside soccer and cricket as a major sport.
rank and file
▪ The rank and file of the party had lost confidence in the leadership.
rank outsiderBritish English
▪ Last year he was a rank outsider for the title.
serried ranks
▪ the serried ranks of reporters waiting outside
swell the ranks/numbers of sth (=increase the number of people in a particular situation)
▪ Large numbers of refugees have swollen the ranks of the unemployed.
taxi rank
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
high
▪ The higher the eventual rank, the more likely was blame to be similarly apportioned.
▪ In the highest rank, the brahmins were the priests, masters of spiritual matters.
▪ He reached high rank and for bravery was made a Hero of the Soviet Union.
▪ The Conqueror's bishops in Normandy included his half-brother, Odo of Bayeux, and several of high baronial rank.
▪ By the fifteenth century the higher ranks of the nobility had taken over again.
▪ There is nothing surprising in this continuing emphasis on noble birth and high social rank.
▪ Now there is talk of recruiting blacks and Latinos, traditionally absent from the higher union ranks, to more prominent positions.
junior
▪ Abdullah was the equivalent of a constable, the most junior career rank, almost on a par with conscripts.
▪ A second round of ministerial changes, in the middle and junior ranks, will be announced tomorrow.
▪ He signed for Palace on 8 March 1962 and progressed through the Junior ranks for a couple of seasons.
▪ He could mature well after coming through the junior ranks.
low
▪ Atkins was sent to the bar for drinks which would suggest that he had the lowest standing or rank.
▪ Low-ranking females will have young of whatever gender leaves the troop in order not to saddle the young with low rank.
▪ Such was the haste to build that the lower ranks of the Party were often not provided for properly.
▪ The leader of the future will push responsibility and accountability down to the lowest ranks of the organization.
▪ The 15 percent. was largely accounted for in the lower ranks.
▪ They mistreat those in a lower rank, pressure us unnecessarily hinting that they will sue us or call on our superiors.
▪ The lowest ranks of society showed the most striking and significant contrasts.
▪ How far were they newly promoted from the lower social ranks?
massed
▪ For rural Britain faces the massed ranks of developers, poised for action with diggers and cranes.
▪ While they slept, heavy clouds swirled over the valley in massed ranks and the snow began to fall.
middle
▪ The critics argued that for the same money they could promote a lot more lecturers to the middle rank of Reader.
▪ The most that I can claim or flatter myself with, is to be of the middle rank....
▪ A second round of ministerial changes, in the middle and junior ranks, will be announced tomorrow.
▪ Much is explained by the growth of purchasing power and consuming propensities among the middle ranks of society.
▪ The lower and even the middle ranks of the bureaucracy were to a considerable extent decentralized and independent of royal power.
republican
▪ This effort to head off support for the more costly Democratic bill failed to prevent 13 Republican senators breaking ranks.
▪ The Republican rank and file.&038;.
▪ The 1980s idea, that cuts pay for themselves, still has fans in Republican ranks.
▪ Dole denied any rift in Republican ranks as congressional leaders and Clinton prepared to resume their negotiations last night.
senior
▪ Since his arrival, Sir Kit McMahon has shunned the clearing-bank careerists who traditionally peppered Midland's senior ranks.
▪ Hundreds of people left immediately, especially from the combined group's senior ranks.
▪ It is extremely important to keep the senior ranks.
▪ He also said senior ranks would be employed on fixed term contracts, and their pay would be performance related.
▪ That depended on the skill and expertise of those senior ranks.
▪ The more senior ranks, such as sergeants, warrant officers, captains and majors, were all in post.
▪ The more senior ranks are usually more settled.
▪ It was achieved only because the senior ranks were there and able to provide the infrastructure and necessary training.
serried
▪ Dexter stood at the back of the conference suite behind the video cameras and serried ranks of reporters.
▪ There were occasions to admire the police enmasse as they marched in serried ranks to patriotic tunes from the Police Band.
▪ At least a hundred thousand people surrounded the cathedral where the chiefs in all their finery were massed in serried ranks.
social
▪ Empson's criticism bespeaks a man of some social rank, and in manner it is appropriately insouciant and grand.
▪ The supervisors commented frequently about social rank and status.
▪ How far were they newly promoted from the lower social ranks?
▪ In primates it seems to be based on social rank.
▪ More subtly there is the unctuous sadism of money and of social rank.
▪ Opportunities for influence and participation are thus not dependent on the social rank or size of such groups.
▪ There is nothing surprising in this continuing emphasis on noble birth and high social rank.
▪ There is also an exaggerated demarcation of social distance between ranks, and deferential behavior by subordinate ranks toward superiors.
top
▪ I was enjoying running but was still not going to put in the time necessary to break into the top rank.
▪ Yorkshire Television is apparently going into the new franchise with not a woman in its top rank.
■ NOUN
cab
▪ A familiar figure got out of the bus and walked straight to the cab rank.
▪ McCready waited ten minutes, strolled to the cab rank on Tunistrasse and hailed a cab for Bonn.
▪ So I goes to the cab rank, and gets up on the box.
taxi
▪ He scurried over to the taxi rank.
▪ But the taxi rank outside the hotel had been full and idle and the target had been straight into a vehicle.
▪ Bus information: Brighton 206666. Taxi ranks are situated at convenient locations in the town centre.
▪ The front line is this taxi rank in the town centre.
■ VERB
break
▪ As she approached, one of them broke ranks and went to stand over Edward, apparently addressing him.
▪ Moderate Assembly Republicans broke ranks with conservative members to defeat a GOP-sponsored bill that would have returned corporal punishment to the classroom.
▪ This effort to head off support for the more costly Democratic bill failed to prevent 13 Republican senators breaking ranks.
▪ The party has broken ranks, with five of its nine presidential hopefuls calling for a review of the revisions.
▪ I was enjoying running but was still not going to put in the time necessary to break into the top rank.
▪ The older sisters played too, although one broke ranks to play volleyball in her junior college days.
▪ Only then, in the shock of the open air at last, did we break ranks and go our separate ways.
▪ But I broke ranks with him.
close
▪ The Crevecoeurs had always closed ranks in times of crisis, hadn't they?
▪ For a time, none the less, the Congregationalist clergy closed ranks around the Suspect Mayhew against the great enemy that Caner represented.
▪ What happens in this situation has been well documented: Each group becomes more cohesive, as members close ranks.
▪ She had done the unforgivable, and now we closed ranks against her.
▪ We must close ranks with them because we talk the same language.
▪ The Arab world is closing ranks against terror and everyone understands that this means terror against us.
▪ The male mafia will close ranks and deem such a woman unstable, neurotic and quite unsuitable for responsibility.
▪ Those who want to close ranks in this fashion will find themselves very lonely, however.
hold
▪ But they don't hold any rank with the army unless the Khan chooses, and they command only their own guard.
▪ Kimmel held four-star rank and Short wore three stars on the day of the attack.
▪ He held the rank of Boy First Class, and his duty was to help sight Chester's forward s.sin gun.
▪ She holds the same rank Schlesinger did when he joined the Marine Corps in 1930.
▪ His father had held army rank and won a medal in the last war.
join
▪ They accuse the authorities of intimidating others to stop them joining their ranks.
▪ Rice noted that Brown is not the only former speaker of a state legislature to join the mayoral ranks.
▪ The system co-opts others to join its ranks, and pays attention to some citizens very much more readily than others.
▪ Dole now joins the ranks fo the unencumbered.
▪ But after joining the Veteran ranks in August, Wheway has not disappointed his public.
▪ Both Ari and Nathan looked sullen and had clearly joined ranks over something.
▪ Both received top scores on their university examinations and joined the ranks of scholars.
pull
▪ Vi had the situation under control but the chief could, and probably would, pull rank.
▪ I do not enjoy pulling rank, but I do not tolerate unmanly gossip and back-biting.
▪ In the end, Naughtie pulled rank, and took on the task himself.
▪ He pulled rank and went to bed at half past eleven, leaving me on for the late-night drinks.
rise
▪ He joined the company in 1989 and steadily rose through the ranks.
▪ He rose up the executive ranks and was well rewarded.
▪ At that time a new dance director had risen through the ranks.
▪ An audible sigh of relief rose from the ranks of mainstream macroeconomists.
▪ He had a powerful mind and he rose to the top rank of the legal profession.
▪ For those with ability it is possible to rise through the ranks to senior maîtred'hôtel.
▪ He rose rapidly through the ranks and by sixteen had reached the highest position in the gang hierarchy.
swell
▪ But have the erstwhile long stay patients swelled the ranks of homeless people?
▪ The ships rode at anchor, their crews merely swelling the ranks of the spectators.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
close ranks
▪ He called for the Lebanese to close ranks behind his government.
▪ President Nixon's staff were instructed to close ranks in response to the Watergate arrests.
▪ The Republicans in Congress have closed ranks and refused to vote for the president's proposal.
▪ When she applied for promotion, the male managers all closed ranks and made sure she didn't get it.
▪ For a time, none the less, the Congregationalist clergy closed ranks around the Suspect Mayhew against the great enemy that Caner represented.
▪ She had done the unforgivable, and now we closed ranks against her.
▪ The Arab world is closing ranks against terror and everyone understands that this means terror against us.
▪ The Crevecoeurs had always closed ranks in times of crisis, hadn't they?
▪ The male mafia will close ranks and deem such a woman unstable, neurotic and quite unsuitable for responsibility.
▪ Those who want to close ranks in this fashion will find themselves very lonely, however.
▪ We must close ranks with them because we talk the same language.
▪ What happens in this situation has been well documented: Each group becomes more cohesive, as members close ranks.
the rank and file
▪ conflict between union leaders and the rank and file at an Alfa Romeo factory
▪ rank-and-file members
▪ The rank and file has lost confidence in the party leadership.
▪ The policy will now have to be approved by the rank and file.
thin the ranks
▪ Higher prices have thinned the ranks of prospective home owners.
▪ But the sector suffered like chemicals and shipping from cyclical downturns in world demand which thinned the ranks.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Four of the boys in Boy Scout Troop 611 reached the rank of Eagle Scout.
▪ Gang members wear clothes or decorations that show the member's rank.
▪ He joined the Los Angeles police department and was eventually promoted to the rank of lieutenant.
▪ She always wore rich fabrics and jewels, as befitted one of her rank.
▪ State your name, rank, and serial number.
▪ The position of Secretary of State holds Cabinet rank.
▪ They were all standing in ranks next to each other.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Applying the usual procedure to obtain this in another frame we obtain so that transforms as a rank 2 tensor.
▪ But we have not been able to attract them into the professorial ranks in anywhere near the percentage they are getting degrees.
▪ He was obviously destined for the professional ranks and as I watched him I could see why.
▪ Her rank, though high, did not meet the level protocol demanded of future empress.
▪ If anything, the past few days demonstrated even more turmoil in Democratic ranks.
▪ Now there is talk of recruiting blacks and Latinos, traditionally absent from the higher union ranks, to more prominent positions.
▪ So I goes to the cab rank, and gets up on the box.
▪ This hot work, however, had left the Confederate ranks badly fragmented.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
as
▪ Though both had appeared in the press and are very slight pamphlets, they rank as first editions in book form.
first
▪ Escondido west of Interstate 15 ranked first in price appreciation as well as sales activity.
▪ M., ranked first with 5. 25.
▪ Then, like now, he was ranked first after Police Commission interviews.
▪ Georgetown was a top seed that finished the season ranked first.
▪ At the time, they were ranked first, second, third, and fourth in the world.
high
▪ All were selected by national coaches and all are currently ranked high up in the 16 and 14 and under categories.
▪ Indiana ranked high as a preseason favorite, while Stanford went unnoticed in all three major polls.
▪ He was a much-decorated officer who had risen to high rank before an honourable retirement.
highly
▪ Personal development programmes and consultations with experts ranked highly in only one quarter of schools.
▪ Statistics for 1995 will be published in February, and Dallas-based Southwest hopes to rank highly once again.
▪ Every year some highly ranked team gets knocked off in the first round by some school that nobody thought stood a chance.
■ NOUN
bottom
▪ On the list of parent-child battles, the media has always ranked near the bottom.
candidate
▪ The city hired a consulting firm to rank the candidates on management and communication skills.
league
▪ Scores are not ranked into a league table.
▪ This season, he ranks fifth in the league in receiving yardage and has caught only five touchdown passes.
▪ Darlington may be the eighty-eighth-ranked League club but believe they have much to offer.
official
▪ The only heaters to be found were in the teachers' lounge and individual offices of deans and ranking officials.
state
▪ Kassebaum wanted some sort of rating system that would rank the states by the general health status of their populations.
▪ California ranks 41st among all states in the amount spent per pupil in kindergarten through high school.
▪ The Panthers are 4-0 and ranked second in the state. 10.
top
▪ The top stocks are ranked in Group 1 and the worst in Group 5.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
the rank and file
▪ conflict between union leaders and the rank and file at an Alfa Romeo factory
▪ rank-and-file members
▪ The rank and file has lost confidence in the party leadership.
▪ The policy will now have to be approved by the rank and file.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Connell, a Canadian ranked 73rd in the world, won the third set.
▪ Sandoz ranks as one of the 10 largest drug companies in the world.
▪ She was beaten by someone who was ranked only 200th in the world.
▪ The name Michael always ranks high on the list of the most popular boys' names.
▪ The Rams have ranked near the bottom of the NFL for two seasons.
▪ Volleyball Monthly ranked the team third in the nation.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But Aetna ranked only satisfactory, as did CareAmerica.
▪ He ranks as one of the most gifted artists of all time.
▪ Nevertheless, as the table shows, we rank among the safest countries in the world.
▪ The following table shows some more recent Utopias, ranked according to date of publication.
▪ The run-time application of syntactic information uses the transition matrices and the lexicon to rank the words in the lattice.
▪ What factors correlate with people who rank structure highly?
III.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
outsider
▪ So I went to Ladbrokes and picked two rank outsiders and put some money on them and left.
▪ Last year he started as a rank outsider for the title.
▪ Though ridden by Graham McCourt, then third in the jump jockeys' table, Norton's Coin was a rank outsider.
smell
▪ The strange, rank smell was stronger than ever and after a few moments they all heard a heavy movement close by.
▪ Everywhere was the rank smell of copra drying.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
rank cheese
rank hypocrisy
▪ Her students range from rank beginners to professionals.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He also had a rank contempt for Desmond Morton.
▪ Of course the rank darkness was different at sunrise or dusk.
▪ The jute had an acrid smell that scooped up the rank aroma of moist earth as it leapt from the ground.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
rank

Rank \Rank\ (r[a^][ng]k), a. [Compar. Ranker (r[a^][ng]k"[~e]r); superl. Rankest.] [AS. ranc strong, proud; cf. D. rank slender, Dan. rank upright, erect, Prov. G. rank slender, Icel. rakkr slender, bold. The meaning seems to have been influenced by L. rancidus, E. rancid.]

  1. Luxuriant in growth; of vigorous growth; exuberant; grown to immoderate height; as, rank grass; rank weeds.

    And, behold, seven ears of corn came up upon one stalk, rank and good.
    --Gen. xli. 5.

  2. Raised to a high degree; violent; extreme; gross; utter; as, rank heresy. ``Rank nonsense.''
    --Hare. ``I do forgive thy rankest fault.''
    --Shak.

  3. Causing vigorous growth; producing luxuriantly; very rich and fertile; as, rank land.
    --Mortimer.

  4. Strong-scented; rancid; musty; as, oil of a rank smell; rank-smelling rue.
    --Spenser.

  5. Strong to the taste. ``Divers sea fowls taste rank of the fish on which they feed.''
    --Boyle.

  6. Inflamed with venereal appetite. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

    Rank modus (Law), an excessive and unreasonable modus. See Modus, 3.

    To set (the iron of a plane, etc.) rank, to set so as to take off a thick shaving.
    --Moxon.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
rank

1570s, "arrange in lines;" 1590s, "put in order, classify; assign a rank to," from rank (n.). Related: Ranked; ranking.

rank

early 14c., "row, line series;" c.1400, a row of an army, from Old French renc, ranc "row, line" (Modern French rang), from Frankish *hring or some other Germanic source (compare Old High German hring "circle, ring"), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz "circle, ring, something curved" (see ring (n.1)).\n

\nMeaning "a social division, class of persons" is from early 15c. Meaning "high station in society" is from early 15c. Meaning "a relative position" is from c.1600.

rank

Old English ranc "proud, overbearing, showy," from Proto-Germanic *rankaz (cognates: Danish rank "right, upright," German rank "slender," Old Norse rakkr "straight, erect"), perhaps from PIE *reg- "to stretch, straighten" (see right (adj.)). In reference to plant growth, "vigorous, luxuriant, abundant, copious" it is recorded from c.1300. Related: Rankly; rankness.\n

\nSense evolved in Middle English to "large and coarse" (c.1300), then, via notion of "excessive and unpleasant," to "corrupt, loathsome, foul" (mid-14c.), perhaps from influence of Middle French rance "rancid." In 17c. also "lewd, lustful."\n

\nMuch used 16c. as a pejorative intensive (as in rank folly). This is possibly the source of the verb meaning "to reveal another's guilt" (1929, underworld slang), and that of "to harass, abuse," 1934, U.S. black dialect, though this also may be from the role of the activity in establishing social hierarchy (from rank (n.)).

Wiktionary
rank

Etymology 1

  1. 1 Strong of its kind or in character; unmitigated; virulent; thorough; utter. 2 Strong in growth; growing with vigour or rapidity, hence, coarse or gross. adv. (context obsolete English) quickly, eagerly, impetuously. Etymology 2

    n. A row of people or things organized in a grid pattern, often soldiers [the corresponding term for the perpendicular columns in such a pattern is "file"]. v

  2. 1 To place abreast, or in a line. 2 To have a ranking. 3 To assign a suitable place in a class or order; to classify. 4 (context US English) To take rank of; to outrank.

WordNet
rank
  1. adj. very fertile; producing profuse growth; "rank earth"

  2. very offensive in smell or taste; "a rank cigar"

  3. conspicuously and outrageously bad or reprehensible; "a crying shame"; "an egregious lie"; "flagrant violation of human rights"; "a glaring error"; "gross ineptitude"; "gross injustice"; "rank treachery" [syn: crying(a), egregious, flagrant, glaring, gross]

  4. complete and without restriction or qualification; sometimes used informally as intensifiers; "absolute freedom"; "an absolute dimwit"; "a downright lie"; "out-and-out mayhem"; "an out-and-out lie"; "a rank outsider"; "many right-down vices"; "got the job through sheer persistence"; "sheer stupidity" [syn: absolute, downright, out-and-out(a), rank(a), right-down, sheer(a)]

  5. growing profusely; "rank jungle vegetation"

rank
  1. v. take or have a position relative to others; "This painting ranks among the best in the Western World"

  2. assign a rank or rating to; "how would you rank these students?"; "The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide" [syn: rate, range, order, grade, place]

  3. take precedence or surpass others in rank [syn: outrank]

rank
  1. n. a row or line of people (especially soldiers or police) standing abreast of one another; "the entrance was guarded by ranks of policemen"

  2. relative status; "his salary was determined by his rank and seniority"

  3. the ordinary members of an organization (such as the enlisted soldiers of an army); "the strike was supported by the union rank and file"; "he rose from the ranks to become a colonel" [syn: rank and file]

  4. position in a social hierarchy; "the British are more aware of social status than Americans are" [syn: social station, social status, social rank]

  5. the body of members of an organization or group; "they polled their membership"; "they found dissension in their own ranks"; "he joined the ranks of the unemployed" [syn: membership]

Wikipedia
Rank (linear algebra)

In linear algebra, the rank of a matrixA is the dimension of the vector space generated (or spanned) by its columns. This is the same as the dimension of the space spanned by its rows. It is a measure of the " nondegenerateness" of the system of linear equations and linear transformation encoded by A. There are multiple equivalent definitions of rank. A matrix's rank is one of its most fundamental characteristics.

The rank is commonly denoted rank(A) or rk(A); sometimes the parentheses are not written, as in rank A.

Rank (album)

Rank is a live album by the English rock band The Smiths. It was released in September 1988 by their British record company, Rough Trade, and reached No. 2 in the British charts. In the United States, the album was released on Sire Records and made No. 77.

Rank (J programming language)

Rank in the J programming language has several different meanings. In general, the concept of rank is used to treat an orthogonal array in terms of its sub-arrays. For instance, a two-dimensional array may be dealt with at rank 2 as the entire matrix, or at rank 1 to work with its implicit one-dimensional columns or rows, or at rank 0 to work at the level of its individual atoms.

Noun rank : The rank of a noun is a non-negative integer.
Verb rank : The rank of a verb is a list of three integers.
The rank conjunction : The rank conjunction ('''"''') is used to derive a verb with a specific rank.
RANK

Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κ B (RANK), also known as TRANCE Receptor or TNFRSF11A, is member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) molecular sub-family. RANK is the receptor for RANK-Ligand (RANKL) and part of the RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling pathway that regulates osteoclast differentiation and activation. It is associated with bone remodeling and repair, immune cell function, lymph node development, thermal regulation, and mammary gland development. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a decoy receptor for RANK, and regulates the stimulation of the RANK signaling pathway by competing for RANKL. The cytoplasmic domain of RANK binds TRAFs 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6 which transmit signals to downstream targets such as NF-κB and JNK.

RANK is constitutively expressed in skeletal muscle, thymus, liver, colon, small intestine, adrenal gland, osteoclast, mammary gland epithelial cells, prostate, vascular cell, and pancreas. Most commonly, activation of NF-κB is mediated by RANKL, but over-expression of RANK alone is sufficient to activate the NF-κB pathway.

RANKL (Receptor Activator for Nuclear factor κ B Ligand) is found on the surface of stromal cells, osteoblasts, and T cells.

Rank (computer programming)

In computer programming, rank with no further specifications is usually a synonym for (or refers to) "number of dimensions"; thus, a bi-dimensional array has rank two, a three-dimensional array has rank three and so on. Strictly, no formal definition can be provided which applies to every programming language, since each of them has its own concepts, semantics and terminology; the term may not even be applicable or, to the contrary, applied with a very specific meaning in the context of a given language.

In the case of APL the notion applies to every operand; and dyads ("binary functions") have a left rank and a right rank.

The box below instead shows how rank of a type and rank of an array expression could be defined (in a semi-formal style) for C++ and illustrates a simple way to calculate them at compile time.

#include <cstddef> /* Rank of a type * ------------- * * Let the rank of a type T be the number of its dimensions if * it is an array; zero otherwise (which is the usual convention) */ template <typename t> struct rank { static const std::size_t value = 0; }; template<typename t, std::size_t n> struct rank<t[n]> { static const std::size_t value = 1 + rank<t>::value; }; /* Rank of an expression * * Let the rank of an expression be the rank of its type */ template <typename t, std::size_t n> char(&rankof(t(&)[n]))[n];

Given the code above the rank of a type T can be calculated at compile time by

rank<T>::value

and the rank of an array-expression expr by

sizeof(rankof(expr))
Rank (formation)

A Rank is a line of military personnel, drawn up in line abreast (i.e. standing side by side).

Rank (differential topology)

In mathematics, the rank of a differentiable mapf : MN between differentiable manifolds at a point pM is the rank of the derivative of f at p. Recall that the derivative of f at p is a linear map


df : TM → TN
from the tangent space at p to the tangent space at f(p). As a linear map between vector spaces it has a well-defined rank, which is just the dimension of the image in TN:


rank(f) = dim(im(df)).

Rank (film)

Rank is a 2002 fourteen-minute short film directed by David Yates. It was nominated for the British Academy Film Award for Best Short Film at the BAFTAs.

Rank (surname)

Rank is the surname of:

  • J. Arthur Rank, 1st Baron Rank (1888–1972), British industrialist and film producer
  • Joseph Rank (1854-1943), founder of Rank Hovis McDougall, one of the UK's largest food production and flour-milling businesses
  • Kyle Rank (ice hockey, born 1982), Canadian ice hockey forward
  • Kyle Rank (ice hockey, born 1987), American ice hockey goaltender
  • Otto Rank (1884–1939), Austrian psychoanalyst, writer, teacher, and therapist
Rank (graph theory)

In graph theory, a branch of mathematics, the rank of an undirected graph is defined as the number , where is the number of vertices and is the number of connected components of the graph. Equivalently, the rank of a graph is the rank of the oriented incidence matrix associated with the graph.

Analogously, the nullity of an undirected graph is the nullity of its incidence matrix, given by the formula , where n and c are as above and m is the number of edges in the graph. The nullity is equal to the first Betti number of the graph. The sum of the rank and the nullity is the number of edges.

Usage examples of "rank".

The challenge, drawn up in strict accordance with the old military code of honor by General Beck himself, was given to General von Rundstedt, as the senior ranking Army officer, to deliver to the head of the S.

One at a time, the partners ranked their clients based on the risk in their accounting practices.

In this respect, the decision in the Florida election case may be ranked as the single most corrupt decision in Supreme Court history, because it is the only one that I know of where the majority justices decided as they did because of the personal identity and political affiliation of the litigants.

Is it not a strange infatuation to rank the moments of affliction among the evil events of our lives, when these may prove the very means of bringing back our wandering feet to the path which leads to everlasting life?

Supreme Affluent nodded, already shifting through the ranks of his enemies, trying to decide who might be behind this murderous attempt.

Her hereditary rank in the third oldest family of Pesht, tenth Terran colony to join the Allegiancy Empire, had never meant anything to her.

He drew them up in two ranks facing each other, and began very deliberately with an allocution on the art of the bayonet.

But after this allotment of rank and function, all act consonant with the will of the gods keeps the sequence and is included under the providential government, for the Reason-Principle of providence is god-serving.

Bernadotte then went to the waters of Plombieres, and on his return to Paris he sent me a letter announcing his elevation to the rank of Prince Royal of Sweden.

He wanted to before, but now that someone jumps off the starting high-flier and shouts his name plus his super annuated rank to the ends of the world, the meanwhile alderman and sharpshooter Heinrich Osterhues has lost all inclination and wants only to make himself scarce.

In opposition to Gnosticism and Marcionitism, the main articles forming the estate and possession of orthodox Christianity were raised to the rank of apostolic regulations and laws, and thereby placed beyond all discussion and assault.

In the Trecento, there was no clear concept of architecture as a profession, and in Florence, the men who designed buildings often came from the ranks of artisans: sculptors, painters, goldsmiths, and woodworkers.

Claudius Pompeianus, the virtuous husband of Lucilla, was the only senator who asserted the honor of his rank.

Their officers asserted the superiority of rank by a more profuse and elegant luxury.

The emperor, in his turn, viewing every rank of his subjects with the same contemptuous indifference, asserted without control his sovereign privilege of lust and luxury.