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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

right

I.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a civil rights lawyer
▪ He has worked as a civil rights lawyer for over twenty years.
a God-given right (=the right to do something without asking anyone else’s opinion)
▪ The protesters have no God-given right to disrupt the life of the city.
a move in the right direction
▪ The decision seemed to be a move in the right direction.
a right of appeal
▪ The taxpayer has no statutory right of appeal against the demand.
a step in the right direction (=an action that helps to improve things)
▪ Environmentalists said the law was a step in the right direction.
all right
▪ ‘What’s the food like?’ ‘It’s all right, but the place on campus is better.’
animal rights activists/campaigners/groups etc
▪ Bill has been involved in the animal rights movement for years.
animal rights
▪ Bill has been involved in the animal rights movement for years.
bill of rights
civil rights demonstration/movement etc
▪ a civil rights leader
civil rights (=the right to vote, be treated fairly etc that everyone should have)
▪ Black people marched in defence of their civil rights.
civil rights
▪ a civil rights leader
common-law rules/courts/rights etc
constitutional right
▪ a constitutional right to privacy
Damn right
▪ ‘It isn’t easy.’ ‘Damn right, it’s not.’
dead right/wrong
▪ You’re dead wrong, so let me handle this.
defending...right
▪ We are defending the right to demonstrate.
divine right
▪ Being my wife doesn’t give you the divine right to read my mail.
employment rights (=the rights that someone has in their job)
▪ Part-time workers don’t have the same employment rights as full-time staff.
equal rights
▪ In many countries, women do not have equal rights with men.
Equality And Human Rights Commission, the
feel a right/proper charlie (=feel very stupid)
feeling all right
▪ Are you feeling all right?
forfeited...right
▪ By being absent from the trial, he forfeited the right to appeal.
gay rights (=equal treatment for gay people)
▪ a campaigner for gay rights
get your facts right/straight (=make sure that what you say or believe is correct)
▪ You should get your facts straight before making accusations.
getting on all right
▪ The kids seem to be getting on all right at school.
give...the divine right to
▪ Being my wife doesn’t give you the divine right to read my mail.
go right ahead
▪ If you want to leave, go right ahead.
guess right/correctly/wrong
▪ If you guess correctly, you have another turn.
has right of way
▪ I never know who has right of way at this junction.
have a vested right to
▪ Shareholders have a vested right to 10% per annum.
have the right of way
▪ The law here says that pedestrians always have the right of way.
have the right to complain
▪ You have the right to complain if you’re not satisfied with the service you’re getting.
human right
▪ human rights violations
human rights abuses
▪ An independent committee will look into alleged human rights abuses.
human rights violations (=violations of every person's right to be treated fairly and without cruelty)
▪ There have been protests about human rights violations at the prison.
if my memory serves (me correctly/right) (=used to say that you are almost certain you have remembered something correctly)
▪ If my memory serves me correctly, Johnson was also there.
If you play your cards right
▪ Who knows? If you play your cards right, maybe he’ll marry you.
in the right/wrong frame of mind
▪ You have to be in the right frame of mind to play well.
It is only right and proper
It is only right and proper that an independent inquiry should take place.
it’s all right for some
▪ ‘I get eight weeks’ holiday a year.‘ ’Well, it’s all right for some.'
keep left/right (=stay to the left or right of a path or road as you move)
look straight/right through sb
▪ I saw Fiona in the street yesterday and she looked straight through me.
make a left/right turn
▪ Make a left turn at the station.
of high/the right etc calibre
▪ The paintings were of the highest caliber.
oh, okay/all right
▪ ‘Can you lend me ten pounds?’ ‘Oh, all right, but only until tomorrow.’
on the right lines (=doing something the right way)
▪ The company’s rapid success means it’s definitely on the right lines.
peace/human rights etc monitors
▪ The UN is sending peace monitors to the area.
pitch sth at a high level/the right level etc
▪ The projects were pitched at a number of different levels.
point...in the right direction
▪ A financial adviser should be able to point you in the right direction.
political rights
▪ Every individual should have equal political rights.
political/gay/animal rights etc activist
proprietary rights
▪ They have proprietary rights to the data.
protest/civil rights/peace etc march
▪ I went on a lot of peace marches when I was a student.
prove sb wrong/right
▪ See if you can prove me wrong.
public right of way
▪ The path is not a public right of way.
quite all right
▪ ‘Thanks for all your help!’ ‘That’s quite all right.’
religious right
right a wrong (=bring justice to an unfair situation)
right across
▪ Teachers are expected to teach a range of subjects right across the curriculum.
right across
▪ Someone’s parked right across the entrance to the driveway.
right angle
▪ Hold the brush at right angles to the surface.
right at/from the beginning (=used for emphasis)
▪ That’s what I suggested right at the beginning.
right beside
▪ I was standing right beside her at the time.
right cross
▪ He caught his opponent with a right cross to the chin.
right foot
▪ He has broken a bone in his right foot.
right from wrong
▪ He’s too young to know right from wrong.
Right Honourable
▪ the Right Honourable Giles Williams MP
right in the middle
▪ a huge hole right in the middle of the lawn
right now (=exactly now)
▪ There’s nothing I can do about this right now.
right of appeal
right of veto
▪ The head teacher has the right of veto over management-board decisions.
right of way
▪ I never know who has right of way at this junction.
right on
▪ It’s one of those annoyingly right-on magazines about the environment.
right on...doorstep
▪ Wow! You’ve got the beach right on your doorstep!
right out
▪ They’ve rented a farmhouse right out in the country.
right this minute
▪ You don’t have to tell me right this minute.
right through the middle
▪ The new road will go right through the middle of the wood.
right through
▪ We drove right through the town centre.
right through
▪ He slept right through the day.
right to life
▪ Every unborn child has a right to life.
right to the top
▪ I filled the glass right to the top.
right triangle
right/perfect
▪ I’m just waiting for the right moment to tell her.
▪ The moment is not quite right just yet.
rights issue
safeguard sb’s interests/rights/welfare etc
▪ The industry has a duty to safeguard consumers.
sb's calculations are right/correct/accurate
▪ Fortunately his calculations were accurate.
sb's left/right ear
▪ She is deaf in her right ear.
sb's right to privacy
▪ Children feel more comfortable when parents respect their right to privacy.
sb’s left/right arm
▪ She broke her left arm in a riding accident.
sb’s right/left hand
▪ She held the book in her right hand.
see right through me
▪ I can’t bluff – she’d see right through me.
see right through
▪ I could see right through the thin curtains.
seem important/right/strange etc to sb
▪ Doesn’t that seem weird to you?
sharp left/right
▪ Take a sharp left after the church.
sole rights
▪ The company now has the sole rights to the process.
sound all right
▪ We’ll eat at eight. Does that sound all right to you?
stage right
▪ She had to exit stage right.
straight/right past (=used to emphasize that someone passes close to you and does not stop)
▪ Monica hurried straight past me and down the steps.
straight/right/clean through
▪ The bullet passed straight through his skull.
strike the right balance
▪ It isn’t always easy to strike the right balance.
strike...the right note (=be what the people wanted)
▪ Moderate Republicanism appeared to strike exactly the right note with the voters .
swing to the Right/Left (=in politics)
the exclusive rights to sth
▪ BSkyB had exclusive rights to all the live matches.
the left/right side
▪ He received a deep cut on the right side of his face.
the right decision
▪ She chose to study Engineering and it was definitely the right decision.
the right move
▪ He hoped he had made the right move in telling his father.
the right sort
▪ Wearing the right sort of clothing could save your life.
the right stuff (=qualities that make you able to deal with difficulties)
▪ Does he have the right stuff?
the right to exist
▪ The president issued a statement recognizing Kosovo's right to exist.
the right way
▪ That’s not the right way to deal with the problem.
the right way
▪ Are you sure this is the right way?
the right/correct conclusion
▪ I am sure that you came to the right conclusion.
the right/correct order
▪ Of course, the notes must be played in the right order.
the right/exact word (=the word that has the meaning you want)
▪ He struggled to find the right word.
the right/proper/correct balance
▪ With sport, you have to find the right balance between competition and fun.
the right/right-hand corner
▪ Put your address in the top right-hand corner of the page.
the rights of the individual
▪ The rights of the individual must be protected.
the right/wrong answer
▪ Do you know the right answer to this question?
the right/wrong choice
▪ I think you’ve made the right choice.
the right/wrong direction
▪ Are you sure this is the right direction for Shipton?
the right/wrong kind
▪ It wasn’t the right kind of holiday for me.
to the left/right of sth
▪ To the left of the sofa is a table.
turn out all right
▪ Don’t worry, it’ll turn out all right.
walk straight/right into sth
▪ I walked right into a mob of maybe 50 young white guys.
walk straight/right into sth
▪ You walked right into that one!
walk straight/right/bang etc into sth
▪ Zeke wasn’t looking and walked straight into a tree.
went all right (=happened with no problems)
▪ Tony was worried about the meeting but it went all right.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
all
▪ She knows what she's doing all right.
▪ Her doctor whistled, and assured her she was all right,, and carried the procedure through to the horrific end.
▪ I will do the opposite, if it's all right by you-and always be glad you came.
▪ The Anacreonians were landing their first space-ships tomorrow, but that was all right, too.
▪ The crew, wrapped cocoon-like in their blankets, were doing all right though.
▪ He was there, all right.
▪ During these brief moments I felt immeasurably better; maybe everything would be all right after all.
▪ We were hated, all right.
far
▪ The caption alongside notes that George Davies, aged 19, is in the front row on the far right.
▪ Jesse Helms, stalwart of the Republican far right.
▪ There are several options for securing tickets: you can complete the coupon on the far right.
▪ That Begin had come from the far right, but that in order to govern he has to occupy the center.
▪ The far right objects that the tests encourage children to criticise traditional values.
▪ For now, at least, the cause of tax simplification seems to have been captured by the far right.
just
▪ It's just right for us, of course.
▪ I had a little sharpener to keep the points just right.
▪ Everyone played it just right for Alice.
▪ All are worthwhile, judiciously seasoned with salt and fresh pepper, served a la carte, and cooked just right.
▪ Once again, it seemed that his sense of timing and understanding of politicians had been just right.
▪ This is just right for the Ledger something to finally get this city to take you seriously over there.
▪ With him the mix is just right.
▪ People have trouble positioning the paper and adjusting the software so the printout appears just right.
quite
▪ A greater problem arises at the stage where you have made the article to order and it's not quite right.
▪ The soil is not quite right for the replacement trees.
▪ Then she saw that that was not quite right, because their features were very different.
▪ Marshall McLuhan was not quite right.
▪ I do understand your concern for your sister, but I think that her doctor is quite right in what he says.
▪ But each of us knows that he is not quite right.
▪ Glyn had been quite right after all.
▪ Something was not quite right, so without hesitation he dropped down on to the deck.
■ NOUN
angle
▪ This is the so-called imaginary direction of time, at right angles to real time.
▪ For rails that meet at right angles, the cut should be 45 degrees.
▪ Hold the bag at right angles to the surface to be iced, with the nozzle a fraction away.
▪ The cleavage planes are at right angles to one another.
▪ In a sense it can be thought of as a direction of time that is at right angles to real time.
▪ But the imaginary time direction is at right angles to real time.
▪ The other main rift type is to be found orientated approximately at right angles to the strike of intercontinental collision orogens.
▪ Two point perspective Two point perspective is based on our ready response to the right angle.
answer
▪ The child will work it out on his fingers and get the right answer.
▪ They had simply assumed that, because I had asked the question, one of those words must be the right answer.
▪ No one has all the right answers but there is now a willingness to share information.
▪ What mattered was that I got the right answer.
▪ He damned them all, saying the right answer was political; full stop.
▪ And when you found the right answer, there was no arguing about it.
▪ Corporate strategists point out that there is no single right answer.
▪ When a clinical situation poses a genuine moral dilemma, by definition no right answer exists.
arm
▪ Reach out and slowly lift the right arm and left leg off the floor, keeping the movement controlled.
▪ His right arm and leg were the most damaged.
▪ Reach over to your left side, curving from your right arm.
▪ Denver stretches out her right arm and takes a step or two.
▪ At fifty-five or sixty degrees he had to brace his right arm against his leg in order to fight the roll.
▪ His upper right arm was bandaged.
▪ The right training, the right arms, everything that's coming to the surface now.
▪ He would have given his right arm and left foot if he wanted them.
balance
▪ Getting the right balance in life is important to Pearce.
▪ The right balance of detail should help the reader quickly grasp the nature of the problem and your approach to it.
▪ Find the right balance between enough exercise and enough rest.
▪ As two opposite kinds of people, when they became partners, their very differences provided the right balance for success.
▪ The problem is to know how to strike the right balance.
▪ You must find the right balance of specificity and practicality between the two extremes.
▪ But he always finds the right balance between darkness and light.
▪ U S West Inc. knows all too well how difficult striking the right balance can be.
decision
▪ It was a fine bright day and he felt sure he had made the right decision.
▪ But in the end, we both made the right decision.
▪ No, not so he had taken the right decision.
▪ I still ask myself whether I made the right decision.
▪ If they think the right decision will not be taken, it is their job to persuade people to vote differently.
▪ Now, in his senior year, Jeff feels staying was definitely the right decision.
▪ Even after counselling, though, what seemed the right decision at the time can be a source of regret later.
▪ It was pretty obvious he made the right decision.
direction
▪ Almost everyone concerned with education is looking for the right direction to go, and there is much talk of leadership.
▪ Although that is a step in the right direction for sellers, prices are still substantially below their peaks.
▪ I can even find potted shrimps when the wind's in the right direction.
▪ Luck would give him a gentle shove in the right direction.
▪ I voted for you in the last election and believed that you would lead this town in the right direction.
▪ Your dealer should be able to point you in the right direction. ... and too hard?
▪ This is a start in the right direction.
eye
▪ And the floaters in my right eye.
▪ Then Jack got up and punched me in the right eye so hard I lost the sight of it.
▪ He got a bruising whack in his right eye - the one he uses to peer through his telescope at the stars.
▪ The two photons are like the left and the right eyes of the cat.
▪ Wu looked at me and gestured to his own right eye and giggled.
▪ He was born with a white layer of skin over his right eye.
▪ It has a fearful chip above the right eye but it can stand a few chips.
▪ To look through the tube, which eye do you prefer, your left eye or your right eye?
foot
▪ People said black dancers don't have the right body, the right feet.
▪ Left tackle Derrick Deese has a sprained right foot and is probable for the game.
▪ And Dalton's emphatic right foot volley after 65 minutes put Argyle firmly in command.
▪ Try to lift or move your right foot. 16.
▪ To ensure good luck, your daughter should leave home by the front door, stepping out with her right foot first.
▪ The baby grasped her right foot in her left hand and in her excitement dropped her bottle.
▪ If you put it on the right feet it's clearly one of the best available.
▪ Valerie had had her right foot fused in Rochester, Minn., before she and Joe married.
hand
▪ Many full-length zip bags are available in left and right hand versions enabling two to be zipped together.
▪ He hit in rhythm, hitting with the right hand, then the left.
▪ She extended the forefingers of her right hand in a V, and jabbed at Rodriguez's faceplate.
▪ Ted signaled with his right hand that he was about to turn on to a street marked Myrtle.
▪ He was squeezing the angle of the arête with his right hand, easing his weight over his right foot.
▪ It was our duty to get this stuff into the right hands.
▪ Sunny Jim is stark naked with a big piece of pizza in his right hand.
▪ Is it because the right hand side is going so badly?
kind
▪ London, at the easiest rates and may be ascertained of the right kinds.
▪ Be it in a mousetrap or an atomic detector, the right kind of trip-lever can always trigger an arbitrarily large effect.
▪ But, initially at least, it seemed to express the right kinds of sentiment.
▪ An inside look at the criminal justice system was the right kind of project, he thought.
▪ Referrals Offering the right kind of help where it is needed requires a comprehensive assessment scheme.
▪ The right kind of exercise can cure back pain, headaches and chest pain.
▪ A husband who tells his wife about his redundancy does not always meet with the right kind of sympathy or support.
▪ Without the right kind of help foreign business can mean major headaches.
leg
▪ Slowly push upwards with your right leg until it is almost straight.
▪ After five repetitions he does the same with the right leg.
▪ When help finally arrived he was released from the big baler his right leg was nearly severed from his body.
▪ When the team is going the other way, he crosses his right leg.
▪ Bend your right leg and raise your right arm.
▪ He circled his right leg and plunged back into the water, soaking his master from head to foot.
▪ Now the right leg is thrust out with the foot travelling in a straight line towards the opponent.
▪ One of the dead had had his right leg blown off with his pants.
mind
▪ What was beyond him to understand was why any man in his right mind would want to buy.
▪ No one in his or her right mind likes the thought of paying more taxes.
▪ After all who in their right mind would reject enthusiastic and cost-free labour?
▪ Who in their right mind would save any money, under these circumstances?
▪ Who in his right mind would come and sit next to me?
▪ What government official in her right mind would wish to foster such distrust of the government she serves?
▪ But she wasn't in her right mind.
▪ He might be more in his right mind than you are.
person
▪ He found just the right person for his newly created slot of research associate.
▪ So, for the right person, corporate finance is both a high-risk and high-reward career option.
▪ Are you the right person for this position?
▪ Send them to the right person at the right address for payment and include the following information: 1.
▪ Your whole business might ride on finding the right person.
▪ With this trick you have to be sure you have chosen the right person and moment!
▪ Either way, the problem is to find the right person to advise you, some one who can be objective.
place
▪ Is it in the right place?
▪ He was in the right place at the right time and hustling as he usually does.
▪ King's Cross is not the right place for that sort of departure.
▪ It felt like the right place to me.
▪ At last I found the right place on an island off the north coast.
▪ You imagine him tight and lean, without a trace of fat, bulging in all the right places.
▪ What complicated this debate was the question of whether there were enough houses of the right kind in the right places.
▪ More importantly, independents can be the right place for artists who want to keep a degree of creative control.
side
▪ With a small movement, rock to your right side for as many times as is comfortable.
▪ The right side doors and roof were crumpled.
▪ May sleep on right side for preference.
▪ They say it helps keep people on the right side of things.
▪ No stitching is visible from the right side.
▪ She was lying on her right side, her hands crossed in prayer before her.
▪ It would be important to be on the right side of the nuns too.
▪ The Yankees are losing 9-0 in a playoff game when Jair beats out an infield hit to the right side.
thing
▪ One of the sons had done the right thing and had taken the pressure off me for a while.
▪ People are much more likely to do the right thing if they can see some personal advantage to it.
▪ This was apparently not the right thing to say.
▪ At Digital we feel very strongly that people will do the right thing.
▪ Still, fortunately we did the right thing.
▪ I know it was the right thing to do.
▪ Had he done the right thing?
time
▪ All they need to do is walk down the stairs and it'd be the right time.
▪ And they have, just not at the right time.
▪ If we do not provide sufficient places, the necessary skill will not be in the right place at the right time.
▪ Speaking of time, you have to choose the right time to apply the finishes.
▪ In life, the right man to love hardly ever comes at the right time for loving.
▪ It was only a matter of finding the right time and place.
▪ It was so very much the right place at the right time.
▪ Karl Childers came to Billy Bob Thornton just at the right time.
track
▪ Were we on the right track at all?
▪ But the short-term remedies below may help break the sleep-cycle problem and put you on the right track.
▪ He hoped the man was on the right track and did his best to believe that he was.
▪ We started out on the right track.
▪ A few people, though, were on the right track.
▪ I knew I was on the right track when I felt that thrill of pleasure at placing object, not painting it.
▪ The officers consequently had little idea whether they were on the right track or not.
way
▪ I think anger's a really positive energy if you use it in the right way.
▪ He kept showing me the right way to hold it.
▪ However, if you look at things in the right way it is all quite logical and straight forward.
▪ The right way is refusing to let any school fail a child.
▪ They do not have authority over me because the right way to treat their advice depends on my goals.
▪ Firms must find the right way to deliver their message.
▪ But do read the directions carefully to ensure you're using the correct weedkiller in the right way.
▪ She said that getting drunk was not the right way to celebrate Christmas Eve.
wing
▪ The proposals are seen as a pet project of the right wing of the Conservative Party and Conservative students' groups.
▪ Boston cut the deficit to 3-1 when right wing Sandy Moger scored on the power play for his sixth goal.
▪ A mad scramble followed a Dollar free throw, and Hamilton eventually grabbed the ball on the right wing.
▪ The right wing candidate does not make himself available for interview and could not be contacted over the weekend.
▪ Powell spoke hours after the right wing of the Republican party began to unify behind Dole.
▪ In Sao Paulo, after one term of office, right wing parties regained the government.
▪ Then he preens under his right wing, then on top.
word
▪ I already knew the right word for it when I was 11.
▪ In fact, the morale of the crew was very high, if morale was the right word.
▪ Tristan's arrival had prevented her and she would never have found the right words to accompany the gift in any case.
▪ Well, morality is not the right word, but you know what I mean.
▪ Even though words are my trade, I don't know the right words.
▪ With just the right word, glance or smile, they played the game just like he did.
▪ The right word for it is a phenomenon.
▪ Siad Barre will celebrate - if that is the right word - 20 years in power on 21 October.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(from) left to right
▪ Below, left to right: Davey Philips of Clan Skates.
▪ Number them in sequence 1, 2, 3 etc, left to right on each line.
▪ Other winners are, left to right,.
▪ Run your finger along under the words as you read, so that the child learns that reading goes from left to right.
▪ The basic mechanism is to build an edge from left to right.
▪ The group photograph shows, from left to right:.
▪ Years ago, teams could pick up the free-agent menu and read it left to right.
(right) from the word go
▪ At the County Ground, the wolves were on the prowl right from the word go.
▪ I knew it was a deliberate attempt from the word go to bring the band down.
▪ In Damage, from Josephine Hart's novel, he gets more or less everything wrong from the word go.
▪ It was a nightmare from the word go.
▪ The marriage was a disaster from the word go, although I didn't realize this until it was all over.
▪ They are reflexes built into the system from the word go.
(right) under sb's nose
▪ Pat's car was stolen, almost from under his nose.
(right) up your street
▪ Mrs Marriot was a woman up our street who used to sell things in her front room.
▪ So, if that sounds up your street, get your Peak Performance subscription in soon!
▪ This sort of thing should be right up your street.
(right/as if) on cue
▪ And, as if on cue, I did.
▪ And, on cue, he heard the sound of hoofbeats ` on the wind.
▪ Dead on cue the runner hurries over to Eli to answer his question.
▪ Right on cue, a butterfly flew up to the plants we were looking at and landed!
▪ She passed a couple of groundskeepers, who turned as if on cue for a second look.
▪ She should have become angry with him for his persistence, on cue, but for some reason she didn't.
▪ The boys slashed, jumped, and shouted with enthusiasm and on cue.
▪ The sky, as if on cue, was overcast.
(straight/right) from the horse's mouth
God is in his heaven, all's right with the world
Mr Right
assert your rights/independence/superiority etc
▪ And the revolution in the structure of services and management meant elderly frail people found it increasingly difficult to assert their rights.
▪ Athens asserted her rights over her citizens temporarily exiled, as she did over those at home and liable for service.
▪ But she sought not so much to break a taboo as to assert her independence from the male yoke.
▪ Mrs Armitage's heir is already asserting his rights in the matter but that is not my concern.
▪ Power gives us the ability to control, to choose and to assert our independence.
▪ Stickers are available throughout the county to help squeezed out pedestrians assert their rights.
▪ You need to be selective and judge when it is appropriate to assert your rights.
at right angles (to sth)
▪ The aisles intersect at right angles to form the shape of a cross.
be (right) on the money
▪ Carson was right on the money when he said people are tired of big-shot politicians.
▪ That was a case when Jobs's vision was on the money.
be a bit of all right
be on the right/wrong track
▪ A few people, though, were on the right track.
▪ And other signs helped convince me that I was on the right track.
▪ Dole was on the right track when he talked about tolerance, but he mysteriously dropped it once he got the nomination.
▪ He hoped the man was on the right track and did his best to believe that he was.
▪ I knew I was on the right track when I felt that thrill of pleasure at placing object, not painting it.
▪ The officers consequently had little idea whether they were on the right track or not.
▪ You are on the right track so follow your nose.
bear right/left
Bear left where the road divides.
▪ The road bears to the right.
▪ After descending, bear left on to the grassy bridleway which joins the road.
▪ From St Martin's church bear left past Cwmyoy Farm.
▪ Go through gate then bear right across field heading for stile that can be seen on skyline.
▪ His eyes bore right through me.
▪ I came to the place in the road where you bear left to go down to the valley of Chimayo.
▪ On reaching the saddle bear right along the ridge to the summit.
▪ Stay on the main track, bearing left at the fork two miles in.
come good/right
▪ In both cases, prices came right back down within three months.
▪ It seemed clear Corbett wanted me to work at Salomon, but he never came right out and proposed.
▪ It will all come right, now that a different period of history has begun.
▪ More generally, the logistical strengths that the Dole campaign had counted on began to come good.
▪ Periodically, these letters come right out of the woodwork.
▪ Since I was the best spinner of my type in the world, eventually it would all come right.
▪ The light comes right through our curtains and makes sleeping difficult.
▪ The wasp took off as if in fright, but she came right back.
come right out with sth/come right out and say sth
coming (right) up!
do sth right off the bat
▪ I asked him to help, and he said yes right off the bat.
▪ At least not right off the bat.
fork (off) left/right
▪ After 50yds fork right on to a track which climbs up Triscombe Combe.
▪ At the first fork they must go left and at the next fork right and so on until they were challenged.
▪ Then with a wave she forked left and was gone.
get (right) up sb's nose
▪ Darren comes to stay with Nikki and is quick to get up the nose of everyone he meets.
▪ Even reading your horoscope can get up your nose.
▪ I didn't realise it would get up your nose so quickly and so far.
▪ I took her to my room, so that her feathers wouldn't get up Mum's nose.
▪ It had got up Rufus's nose a bit, though Adam had a perfect right to do this.
get your priorities right
▪ Although you are in a seemingly hopeless situation, keep thinking and get your priorities right.
▪ Before we talk, I suggest we get our priorities right.
▪ Have we got our priorities right?
▪ Some people just can't get their priorities right!
go (right/clean) out of sb's mind
▪ She said she was going out of her mind in California.
hang a right/left
▪ Go straight on Vista for two blocks then hang a left.
▪ First, there is that bizarre enormous mythic metal fish that hangs right inside the doorway.
▪ I was just in time to see the Sierra hang a left once over the railway.
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
in the (right) ball park
it serves sb right
keep on the right side of sb
▪ But those wanting to keep on the right side of the law will have to steer clear of the grape.
▪ They were keeping on the right side of the powers that be.
lead sb a merry old dance/a right old dance
left-footed/right-footed
make (all) the right noises (about sth)
might is right
▪ Second, we need some kind of global bodies to prevent a further slide into a politics of might is right.
▪ What the child learns is that might is right.
no one in their right mind ...
on the right/wrong side of 30/40 etc
on the wrong/right side of the law
▪ De Niro plays a lawyer, on the right side of the law.
play your cards right
▪ If you play your cards right, you might get them to reduce the price.
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
play your cards right
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
put sb straight/right
put sth right
▪ Larson has promised to put the city's finances right by the end of the year.
quite right
▪ But this is not quite right.
▪ Distracted vicars want action against the furry little pests, and quite right too.
▪ He was even happy to agree when Louise suggested that the buttons on the jacket were not quite right.
▪ If he thinks something isn't quite right he tells me.
▪ It is quite right that members sensitivities should be aired.
▪ Not quite right, not quite plain enough or narrow enough, but getting there.
▪ Now that is very wrong, and yet, somehow, quite right.
▪ They'd shared a bed in Cumberland and she had comforted Gordon because nothing was quite right.
reserve the right to do sth
▪ The management reserves the right to refuse admission.
▪ Gazette reserves the right to publish at our discretion a photograph of the prize winner. 6.
▪ Human beings reserve the right to alter and change views.
▪ The editor reserves the right to select and edit questions.
▪ The Regional Council reserves the right to augment these observations in reply to the grounds of appeal.
▪ These charges and interest rates are variable and the Bank reserves the right to amend them from time to time.
▪ This must be returned within five days, otherwise we reserve the right to cancel the contract.
▪ We reserve the right to edit letters.
right of abode
▪ That is six times the number to be offered the right of abode in the government's package.
▪ The 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act changed this, and only those born in Britain were henceforth automatically given the right of abode.
▪ This would have allowed the right of abode to all citizens in any part of the country.
right up/down sb's alley
▪ The job sounds right up your alley.
▪ She said, I will tell you this Bobby Kennedy is right up my alley.
sb would give their right arm to do sth
▪ These parents would give their right arms to get their kids into a prestigious school.
sb's heart is in the right place
▪ He can be rude and bad-tempered sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
▪ Mike's a little grouchy sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
see sb right
set sb straight/right
▪ Someone had to set Dave straight on company policies and procedures.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
sharp left/right
▪ For this you turn sharp right off the road from Saint-Jean to Saint-Palais, about half-way between those two towns.
▪ Pass over a broken wall and turn sharp right.
▪ She walked almost to the edge of the cliff, where the road made a sharp left.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ Turn sharp left 80yds before a conifer windbreak.
▪ Turn sharp right downhill and uphill to go through another gate.
▪ Turn left along this road for three quarters of a mile until the road turns sharp right to become Marsh Road.
▪ We made a rocky, wet entry, and then took a sharp right turn along a wall.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
take the words (right) out of sb's mouth
that's quite all right
the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing
the religious right
tick all the right boxes
two wrongs don't make a right
would give anything/a lot/your right arm etc for sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "Your mother's a teacher, isn't she?" "Yes, that's right."
▪ A color picture of her takes up the right side of the card.
▪ Ben struggled to find the right words.
▪ Chris tore a ligament in his right elbow.
▪ Do the right thing - turn off the TV and get the kids playing outside.
▪ Excuse me, but the bill isn't right - we didn't have a Caesar salad.
▪ He's the drummer for that band, right?
▪ I don't know the right word to describe it.
▪ I only want to do the right thing.
▪ I took a pay cut to come here, but I'm sure it was the right thing to do.
▪ I wanted to make sure I was getting involved with the right people.
▪ If you don't push the buttons in the right order, nothing will happen.
▪ Is that the right time?
▪ It's a good school, but it wasn't really right for Melissa.
▪ It's not right to tell lies.
▪ It's only right that parents should help their children.
▪ No, that's not quite right. Lower the left hand corner of the painting just a little more.
▪ Put the words in the right order to make a sentence.
▪ Rich made a right turn into the parking lot.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ And they're right up to a point.
▪ It is irrelevant to the Purchaser whether or not the Vendors know the warranties are right or wrong so long as they accept the risk.
▪ No modem detected: Is your modem installed, plugged into the right port, and switched on?
▪ The right training, the right arms, everything that's coming to the surface now.
▪ When staff at the hospital realised their mistake they quickly brought out the right baby.
II.interjection
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(from) left to right
▪ Below, left to right: Davey Philips of Clan Skates.
▪ Number them in sequence 1, 2, 3 etc, left to right on each line.
▪ Other winners are, left to right,.
▪ Run your finger along under the words as you read, so that the child learns that reading goes from left to right.
▪ The basic mechanism is to build an edge from left to right.
▪ The group photograph shows, from left to right:.
▪ Years ago, teams could pick up the free-agent menu and read it left to right.
(right) from the word go
▪ At the County Ground, the wolves were on the prowl right from the word go.
▪ I knew it was a deliberate attempt from the word go to bring the band down.
▪ In Damage, from Josephine Hart's novel, he gets more or less everything wrong from the word go.
▪ It was a nightmare from the word go.
▪ The marriage was a disaster from the word go, although I didn't realize this until it was all over.
▪ They are reflexes built into the system from the word go.
(right) under sb's nose
▪ Pat's car was stolen, almost from under his nose.
(right) up your street
▪ Mrs Marriot was a woman up our street who used to sell things in her front room.
▪ So, if that sounds up your street, get your Peak Performance subscription in soon!
▪ This sort of thing should be right up your street.
(right/as if) on cue
▪ And, as if on cue, I did.
▪ And, on cue, he heard the sound of hoofbeats ` on the wind.
▪ Dead on cue the runner hurries over to Eli to answer his question.
▪ Right on cue, a butterfly flew up to the plants we were looking at and landed!
▪ She passed a couple of groundskeepers, who turned as if on cue for a second look.
▪ She should have become angry with him for his persistence, on cue, but for some reason she didn't.
▪ The boys slashed, jumped, and shouted with enthusiasm and on cue.
▪ The sky, as if on cue, was overcast.
(straight/right) from the horse's mouth
God is in his heaven, all's right with the world
I'm all right Jack
Mr Right
a hard left/right
▪ I executed a hard right turn, but could not see any other aircraft in my vicinity.
▪ More often, though, they miss, hang a hard left, and return to the dugout.
▪ Sharp took an eight count after taking a hard left hook.
▪ Still not enough to justify this desire to reach across the table and deliver a hard right to the gubernatorial chin.
assert your rights/independence/superiority etc
▪ And the revolution in the structure of services and management meant elderly frail people found it increasingly difficult to assert their rights.
▪ Athens asserted her rights over her citizens temporarily exiled, as she did over those at home and liable for service.
▪ But she sought not so much to break a taboo as to assert her independence from the male yoke.
▪ Mrs Armitage's heir is already asserting his rights in the matter but that is not my concern.
▪ Power gives us the ability to control, to choose and to assert our independence.
▪ Stickers are available throughout the county to help squeezed out pedestrians assert their rights.
▪ You need to be selective and judge when it is appropriate to assert your rights.
at right angles (to sth)
▪ The aisles intersect at right angles to form the shape of a cross.
be (right) on the money
▪ Carson was right on the money when he said people are tired of big-shot politicians.
▪ That was a case when Jobs's vision was on the money.
be a bit of all right
be on the right/wrong track
▪ A few people, though, were on the right track.
▪ And other signs helped convince me that I was on the right track.
▪ Dole was on the right track when he talked about tolerance, but he mysteriously dropped it once he got the nomination.
▪ He hoped the man was on the right track and did his best to believe that he was.
▪ I knew I was on the right track when I felt that thrill of pleasure at placing object, not painting it.
▪ The officers consequently had little idea whether they were on the right track or not.
▪ You are on the right track so follow your nose.
bear right/left
Bear left where the road divides.
▪ The road bears to the right.
▪ After descending, bear left on to the grassy bridleway which joins the road.
▪ From St Martin's church bear left past Cwmyoy Farm.
▪ Go through gate then bear right across field heading for stile that can be seen on skyline.
▪ His eyes bore right through me.
▪ I came to the place in the road where you bear left to go down to the valley of Chimayo.
▪ On reaching the saddle bear right along the ridge to the summit.
▪ Stay on the main track, bearing left at the fork two miles in.
come good/right
▪ In both cases, prices came right back down within three months.
▪ It seemed clear Corbett wanted me to work at Salomon, but he never came right out and proposed.
▪ It will all come right, now that a different period of history has begun.
▪ More generally, the logistical strengths that the Dole campaign had counted on began to come good.
▪ Periodically, these letters come right out of the woodwork.
▪ Since I was the best spinner of my type in the world, eventually it would all come right.
▪ The light comes right through our curtains and makes sleeping difficult.
▪ The wasp took off as if in fright, but she came right back.
come right out with sth/come right out and say sth
coming (right) up!
do all right (for yourself/herself etc)
▪ Anyway, I did all right.
▪ He did all right in that Navy movie, whatever it was.
▪ Wow, so you guys must do all right then, him?
do sth right off the bat
▪ I asked him to help, and he said yes right off the bat.
▪ At least not right off the bat.
fork (off) left/right
▪ After 50yds fork right on to a track which climbs up Triscombe Combe.
▪ At the first fork they must go left and at the next fork right and so on until they were challenged.
▪ Then with a wave she forked left and was gone.
get (right) up sb's nose
▪ Darren comes to stay with Nikki and is quick to get up the nose of everyone he meets.
▪ Even reading your horoscope can get up your nose.
▪ I didn't realise it would get up your nose so quickly and so far.
▪ I took her to my room, so that her feathers wouldn't get up Mum's nose.
▪ It had got up Rufus's nose a bit, though Adam had a perfect right to do this.
get your priorities right
▪ Although you are in a seemingly hopeless situation, keep thinking and get your priorities right.
▪ Before we talk, I suggest we get our priorities right.
▪ Have we got our priorities right?
▪ Some people just can't get their priorities right!
go (right/clean) out of sb's mind
▪ She said she was going out of her mind in California.
hang a right/left
▪ Go straight on Vista for two blocks then hang a left.
▪ First, there is that bizarre enormous mythic metal fish that hangs right inside the doorway.
▪ I was just in time to see the Sierra hang a left once over the railway.
have a perfect right to do sth
▪ You have a perfect right to say "no" if you don't want to do it.
▪ They have a perfect right to object to it.
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
in the (right) ball park
it serves sb right
it'll be all right on the night
it's all right
▪ It's all right. Mommy's here now.
▪ I think it's all right.
▪ I will do the opposite, if it's all right by you-and always be glad you came.
▪ It's all right but he prefers Cabanaconda.
▪ It's all right, my darling, Mrs Jourdelay's driving us.
▪ Now, Benny, it's all right.
it's all right for sb
▪ But if it's all right for wives to have this status, then it's all right for cohabitees too.
▪ It's all right for you.
it's/that's all right
keep on the right side of sb
▪ But those wanting to keep on the right side of the law will have to steer clear of the grape.
▪ They were keeping on the right side of the powers that be.
lead sb a merry old dance/a right old dance
left-footed/right-footed
make (all) the right noises (about sth)
might is right
▪ Second, we need some kind of global bodies to prevent a further slide into a politics of might is right.
▪ What the child learns is that might is right.
no one in their right mind ...
on the right/wrong side of 30/40 etc
on the wrong/right side of the law
▪ De Niro plays a lawyer, on the right side of the law.
play your cards right
▪ If you play your cards right, you might get them to reduce the price.
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
play your cards right
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
prescriptive right
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
put sb straight/right
put sth right
▪ Larson has promised to put the city's finances right by the end of the year.
quite right
▪ But this is not quite right.
▪ Distracted vicars want action against the furry little pests, and quite right too.
▪ He was even happy to agree when Louise suggested that the buttons on the jacket were not quite right.
▪ If he thinks something isn't quite right he tells me.
▪ It is quite right that members sensitivities should be aired.
▪ Not quite right, not quite plain enough or narrow enough, but getting there.
▪ Now that is very wrong, and yet, somehow, quite right.
▪ They'd shared a bed in Cumberland and she had comforted Gordon because nothing was quite right.
reserve the right to do sth
▪ The management reserves the right to refuse admission.
▪ Gazette reserves the right to publish at our discretion a photograph of the prize winner. 6.
▪ Human beings reserve the right to alter and change views.
▪ The editor reserves the right to select and edit questions.
▪ The Regional Council reserves the right to augment these observations in reply to the grounds of appeal.
▪ These charges and interest rates are variable and the Bank reserves the right to amend them from time to time.
▪ This must be returned within five days, otherwise we reserve the right to cancel the contract.
▪ We reserve the right to edit letters.
right of abode
▪ That is six times the number to be offered the right of abode in the government's package.
▪ The 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act changed this, and only those born in Britain were henceforth automatically given the right of abode.
▪ This would have allowed the right of abode to all citizens in any part of the country.
right up/down sb's alley
▪ The job sounds right up your alley.
▪ She said, I will tell you this Bobby Kennedy is right up my alley.
right/left justified
▪ Numeric quantities can be printed left justified by preceding them with a semi-colon.
sb would give their right arm to do sth
▪ These parents would give their right arms to get their kids into a prestigious school.
sb's heart is in the right place
▪ He can be rude and bad-tempered sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
▪ Mike's a little grouchy sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
see sb right
set sb straight/right
▪ Someone had to set Dave straight on company policies and procedures.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
sharp left/right
▪ For this you turn sharp right off the road from Saint-Jean to Saint-Palais, about half-way between those two towns.
▪ Pass over a broken wall and turn sharp right.
▪ She walked almost to the edge of the cliff, where the road made a sharp left.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ Turn sharp left 80yds before a conifer windbreak.
▪ Turn sharp right downhill and uphill to go through another gate.
▪ Turn left along this road for three quarters of a mile until the road turns sharp right to become Marsh Road.
▪ We made a rocky, wet entry, and then took a sharp right turn along a wall.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
take the words (right) out of sb's mouth
that's quite all right
the far left/right
▪ For now, at least, the cause of tax simplification seems to have been captured by the far right.
▪ He unplugged the cables, shoved all the levers over to the far left, and rewound the tape.
▪ However, the fact that the far right won more votes than the far-left should make everyone pause and reflect.
▪ That Begin had come from the far right, but that in order to govern he has to occupy the center.
▪ The activities of the far right have been a cause for concern over here for a while now.
▪ The good tee shot was played to the far right of the fairway to set up a second shot to the left.
▪ The libertarian view A third view of the revolution has been developed by writers on the far Left of the political spectrum.
▪ The top of the hierarchy is at the far left.
the hard left/right
▪ But what happens when you want so much to be right, you end up helping the hard right?
▪ Labour moderates win over four of the hard left by agreeing that the cuts shall involve as few compulsory redundancies as possible.
▪ Mr Steve King, leader of the hard left, denounces his fellow-councillors as dunderheads, nincompoops and dolts.
▪ The showing for the hard left was disappointing.
▪ They were stars of the hard left, but we have heard little about them during the election struggle.
▪ Too little, say the Tories, too much says the hard left.
the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing
the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing
the religious right
tick all the right boxes
top left/right/centre
▪ A slightly larger percentage of pairs of brooches were more abraded on the top right than the top left corner.
▪ Here we want the Series in a column so check Columns in the box at the top left.
▪ The completed board is shown top left.
▪ The dark area in the top right is deep, clear water.
▪ The file was a standard office file with a Prior, Keen, Baldwin label stuck in the top right corner.
▪ The majority of single brooches examined were found to be more abraded on the top left corner than the top right.
▪ The plane again runs roughly from top left to bottom right.
▪ Using a tapestry needle threaded with the embroidery colour, begin at the top right of the motif.
two wrongs don't make a right
would give anything/a lot/your right arm etc for sth
III.adverb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
keep
▪ Where the path divides, keep right on the lower path.
▪ These guys were digging their own graves, and women all over the country were watching while they kept right on shoveling.
▪ When one of them is coming toward you, they keep right on going.
▪ On all crucial passages of a rock ridge, the rope should be kept right.
▪ A terrible wicked idea, it made me shiver to think it but I kept right on thinking.
▪ Enter farmyard, turn right and keep right, to pass through gate and on to road.
▪ They kept right on eating, their fear overcome by hunger.
play
▪ Regarding tonight I'd be very suprised if Merson plays right up front.
▪ The Seminoles are the team probably no one wants to play right now.
▪ Sadly I haven't got time to play right now, I've got to split for an urgent dinner date.
▪ The Sox want Canseco, the designated hitter in 1995, to play right.
▪ Cooperation pays, but so does betrayal, if played right.
▪ You play right into his hands.
▪ She danced up a storm at an Alexandria, Va., club where the Desperadoes played right after the election.
put
▪ Is the hon. Lady saying that, if a Labour Government were elected, they would immediately put right that ratio?
▪ And that was something I was going to put right.
▪ In every chapter, on almost every page, a popular misconception about science is patiently exposed and put right.
▪ There are two general principles involved in putting right the unsatisfactory situation we have gradually disentangled and thus clarified.
▪ So obvious a structural fault must be easy to diagnose and put right.
▪ No, there was nothing wrong with their uniforms that couldn't be put right, as far as Vi was concerned.
▪ There was nothing that a few lessons would not put right.
▪ But that could be put right, now, with the traditional builders sand.
run
▪ Now we had a continual length of wire running right over the summit of the hill.
▪ Permafrost line runs right through middle, I think.
▪ A verandah ran right round the house.
▪ The result was that it seemed to be on the point of running right over the horses, which were standing still.
▪ This first fence would run right over the top of the hill, and needed a straining post at either end.
▪ Thee has worked so hard, why must thee run right out and find more work?
▪ As he drew nearer, Jessamy felt a distinct tremor run right through her nervous system.
▪ Irene ran in the house and called her sister who ran right over.
start
▪ In fact, they start right now.
▪ You never saw such stiff arms, and you could see the one-man rule starting right there and then.
▪ No wonder people sometimes start right off with an official complaint or even a writ.
▪ That may have started right after the final horn.
▪ The comeback would start, and it would start right now.
▪ When the devotional speaker said amen, Lois was amazed when Charleen started right in.
▪ Do you want this arrangement to start right now?
▪ The parade started right on time.
turn
Turn right at top of ridge by waymarkers.
▪ Hughes kept moving at a deliberate pace, turning right and left to give his benediction.
Turn right and go through the village of Drayton.
▪ He walked briskly to the corner and turned right.
▪ Kragan turned right outside the hotel entrance and walked towards the Rue de Rivoli.
▪ Then turn right on the 7-mile access road and follow the Saddleback sign.
▪ Follow it for around two miles on the loch shore then turn right to gain a ridge.
Turn right and proceed seven miles to the lodge.
walk
▪ When the door clicked he walked right through to the back, past two secretaries who did not even look up.
▪ You walked right into the living room, and it was spooky.
▪ I walk right up to the end of the platform.
▪ He none the less walked right in and took charge, with no apparent hesitation, reluctance, shyness or lack of confidence.
▪ She walked right up to the front of the altar and stood still beside Mike.
Walk right at it and threaten to embrace it embrace it if you must.
▪ The man walked right up to within a yard or so of the phonebox and then stood and stared.
▪ Miguel walked right up to the bar, right up to where Spadgie was standing.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Have I spelled your name right?
▪ He sat down right beside her.
▪ Hey, they actually spelled my name right!
▪ I got a mosquito bite right on the end of my nose.
▪ Just as you enter town, turn right onto Main Street.
▪ Most people can't do it right the first time.
▪ That hit me right in the eye!
▪ The government can't seem to do anything right.
▪ The plane touched down right at the water's edge.
▪ The TV lights were shining right in his face.
▪ They've been punished for their crimes, and quite rightly.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Follow the track until the level bears off right.
▪ He did all right in that Navy movie, whatever it was.
▪ He was turning on the ball right away against veteran pitchers.
▪ I knew right away it was national security.
▪ She didn't come back right away because the phone rang.
▪ The only thing I seem to be doing right is writing.
IV.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
basic
▪ I appeal to the Secretary of State not to deny the people of Ireland the basic and fundamental right of full democracy.
▪ One was the simple protection of individual rights against an encroaching state, the basic defence of rights in the liberal tradition.
▪ Granted, gay couples are denied the basic rights that heterosexual married couples enjoy.
▪ This basic right can not be abrogated by the decision of the parents, the doctor or the State.
▪ Thus, for basic civic rights like not being enslaved or imprisoned without trial, people should need only to be people.
civil
▪ The Parachute regiment shot dead 13 unarmed Catholics on an illegal civil rights demonstration in Londonderry on January 30, 1972.
▪ It was' 68, and we were both, you know, radical, and civil rights, and feminism.
▪ All were later to be intensely involved in the civil rights movement.
▪ No sooner had voters approved Prop. 209 than civil rights lawyers filed appeals challenging its constitutionality.
▪ The president's half brother and one of his sons sued the government for trampling on their civil rights!
▪ Enormous change had occurred since the beginning of the civil rights movement.
▪ He said he was a member of the Congress of Racial Equality, a predominantly black civil rights group.
▪ Many of the poor, however, did not benefit from the civil rights movement before it ended.
constitutional
▪ Important policy changes will invariably carry revenue and expenditure implications and Congress jealously guards its constitutional rights in such matters.
▪ Numerous violations of constitutional rights went unpunished during the thirties.
▪ There is no constitutional right to bear arms.
▪ Indignant, some rejected both questions as long as they were denied their constitutional rights.
▪ Strengthen the constitutional rights of individuals within Northern Ireland.
▪ The ruling declared that dying people have a constitutional right to end their suffering.
▪ Further constitutional rights were restored on Dec. 19, but the guarantee against arrests without a judicial order was not reinstated.
▪ The principal claimed that this violated his constitutional rights.
equal
▪ Does everybody have equal voting rights, or does it work by consensus?
▪ Both husband and wife had equal rights to divorce in Roman society.
▪ But their equal rights were not to justice.
▪ Guarantee equal rights for gay men and lesbians through changes to criminal law, anti-discrimination legislation and police practices.
▪ It would also give females equal rights of inheritance with males, replacing the frequent favoritism toward the eldest son.
▪ Questions about equal access to services and equal rights to treatment also raise important issues about the value of particular interventions.
▪ Respondents backed equal rights for gays and lesbians, but they were about evenly split on the morality of homosexual relationships.
exclusive
▪ The symbolic resources are such things as exclusive rights to access parts of the database, operating system locks, and so on.
▪ Woods supported Motown with ample airplay and was rewarded with the exclusive rights to promote the Revue when it reached Philadelphia.
▪ What they want is business, not as an exclusive right but as a first option.
▪ Amtrak does, although Conrail has an exclusive right to operate any freight trains on the corridor.
▪ The assertion of exclusive rights will, however, be actionable in tort.
▪ But the spin-off will hold exclusive rights to the vaccine and related scientific data.
▪ Directors were given the exclusive right to manage the day-to-day business of the company.
▪ Each still has exclusive rights to provide a basic, local telephone service.
extreme
▪ At the extreme right of the picture the top of the Citicorp Building has been spun through 180 degrees.
▪ My platoon was the lead platoon on the extreme right.
▪ That day he led a mild extreme to the right of Praying Mantis with his usual mixture of accuracy and irresistible momentum.
▪ He was awarded a law degree at the Sorbonne, where he flirted with the extreme right.
▪ The large mill owner's house is on the extreme right.
▪ Here we formed the extreme right of the line of battle...
▪ In Britain, however, there has been only a modest and localised recent recovery by the extreme right.
▪ We women can not be lured back as long as the extreme right is in control.
fundamental
▪ Some are moral: the overcoming of inequality, and a woman's fundamental right to partake in club affairs.
▪ But there are certain fundamental rights which this right of regulation can not infringe.
▪ Its view was that the president's decision to sack the government contravened a section of the constitution upholding fundamental political rights.
▪ These fundamental rights are variously described and vindicated by a variety of philosophical arguments to which we can not do justice here.
▪ The right to determine what shall be done with one's own body is a fundamental right in our society.
▪ In addition, most other states have constitutional instruments establishing fundamental rights.
▪ In May, 1982, a similar case also challenged parents' fundamental rights.
▪ So I am sceptical when it is said that ordinary people are not interested in fundamental rights.
gay
▪ Clinton and Al Gore have become ardent defenders of a balanced budget and gay rights.
▪ The bill is scheduled to be reconsidered next week, and that spawned a gay rights protest Wednesday at the Capitol.
▪ William Weld, a Republican, formed the state commission, and the next year signed a gay rights law.
▪ But avoiding gay rights does not guarantee immunity from such questions.
▪ On the other hand, by downplaying her own commitment to gay rights, she seemed to be validating the political closet.
▪ Most fundamentalist churches disapprove of homosexuals, and many leaders of the religious right have aggressively campaigned against gay rights.
▪ I want a public that understands gay rights are part of an international movement.
individual
▪ In a nation like the United States this should have been considered a fundamental interference with individual rights.
▪ My country has adopted individual rights in principle, but as far as it goes, it means men, not women.
▪ There is also an emerging globalisation of ethical and judicial standards, which should render social and individual rights more secure.
▪ In this scenario, Western notions of individual rights prevail, but the world economy is largely depressed and sluggish.
▪ The granting of individual landownership rights improved incentives, and facilities for credit and investment improved.
▪ Footnote 4 has served as a cornerstone of contemporary constitutional law in the field of individual rights.
▪ Their analysis traces the political origins and impact of social movement activity in terms of the protection of individual rights of citizenship.
Individual invasion of individual rights is not the subject-matter of the Amendment.
left
▪ And I see that by the left or the right, by compact or by conquest, come they will.
▪ I have selected ten routes to represent the varied character and development of the crag divided left to right.
▪ Run your finger along under the words as you read, so that the child learns that reading goes from left to right.
▪ He built power by playing off left against right, searching for compromises.
▪ So I just walked some more, my head down, shoulders hunched, feet going left right left right left right.
▪ I heard they was dishing out council mortgages left right and centre up there.
legal
▪ This paper is devoted primarily to harmonization of legal rights and duties arising under international transactions.
▪ Often, patients find out-and now have a legal right to know-how they are classified.
▪ Animals are not human, therefore it seems inappropriate for them to have legal rights.
▪ Some women report a new sense of freedom when they obtain knowledge about their legal rights.
▪ But it does not take legal rights seriously.
▪ The registry is largely symbolic and confers none of the legal rights and obligations of marriage.
▪ A will also be justified in reaching an accommodation with B rather than exercising his strict legal rights under the contract.
▪ In New Testament times women were largely uneducated, and had no legal rights and no place in public life.
political
▪ The first force is the inclination of the masses to convert into reality the political rights conceded to them on paper.
▪ Its view was that the president's decision to sack the government contravened a section of the constitution upholding fundamental political rights.
▪ For the political right, Bolick said, the term just ended was a letdown when compared with last year.
▪ Instead Bobbio wishes to extend democratic control to a number of areas within society with strengthened civil, political and social rights.
▪ The Covenant is designed to guarantee civil and political rights to persons within each country that ratifies it.
▪ Civil rights, as opposed to political rights, may be as much as can be hoped for.
▪ It does not reject morality, or even moral and political rights.
top
▪ The majority of single brooches examined were found to be more abraded on the top left corner than the top right.
Top left, top right, travel to the bottom right...
▪ A slightly larger percentage of pairs of brooches were more abraded on the top right than the top left corner.
▪ The dark area in the top right is deep, clear water.
▪ Using a tapestry needle threaded with the embroidery colour, begin at the top right of the motif.
▪ A resounding yes for Julie Christie, top right, and Gabriella Sabatini, left.
▪ The press in the bottom left of the picture has been finished and the one in the top right has not.
▪ Bravais lattices. Top right: Right handed and left handed quartz crystals.
voting
▪ Many seven-day members disapproved of members in other categories, such as social having full voting rights.
▪ Equality of voting rights certainly does not result in equality of power or the disappearance of hierarchy in government.
▪ On regional education committees the teaching unions have had their voting rights removed.
▪ Similarly, an amendment carried in November 1917 did much to nullify the reduction of plural voting rights for town dwellers.
▪ This will normally be granted where the offer will not result in 30 percent or more of the voting rights being acquired.
▪ This requirement may be waived if over 50 percent of the target's voting rights are held by one shareholder.
▪ In the rest of Britain, men and women were given equal voting rights in 1928.
▪ There are no restrictions on attendance, except for voting rights at the general meeting.
■ NOUN
abortion
▪ Feminists threw their weight behind Mrs Killea's campaign, and hundreds of students attended a rally in support of abortion rights.
▪ On the issue of abortion rights, Texans split evenly with 46 percent favoring abortion rights and 46 percent opposing abortion.
▪ We are in favor of abortion rights and reproductive freedom in greater numbers than men.
▪ But abortion rights activists say the procedure is sometimes the safest option available.
▪ A Republican abortion rights group calls it a virtual gag order.
▪ Many voters believed abortion rights were threatened.
▪ Support for abortion rights, for example, continues to decline after peaking at 65 percent in 1990.
animal
▪ The philosophy of animal rights calls for an end to the capture and training of wild animals, for purposes of entertainment.
▪ For more than a quarter-century, Newkirk has dedicated herself to the battle for animal rights.
▪ Separate animal rights organisations now work together in co-ordinated campaigns to persuade teenagers that animals should not be used in research.
▪ The package has been hampered by the threat of protests by animal rights groups.
▪ Bomb squad detectives were called when initial reports suggested animal rights campaigners were responsible.
▪ Not so the philosophy of animal rights.
▪ There are animals rights issues, as exemplified by the SCID-mice.
▪ She spoke frequently in the Debating Society in favour of progressive causes such as abortion, animal rights, state education and nuclear disarmament.
group
▪ Human rights groups object to the proposed 50 percent reduction in the number of refugees who could be admitted to the country.
▪ But foreign witnesses and rights groups say it is a clearly orchestrated operation.
▪ A Republican abortion rights group calls it a virtual gag order.
▪ Human rights groups are calling for a postmortem to ascertain the cause of his death.
issue
▪ That was two years before it became a big civil rights issue.
▪ The authorization of any change in share capital - rights issues, placements, scrip issues and repurchases. 7.
▪ The banks are believed to be pressing for yet another rights issue of new shares at the company.
▪ A previous rights issue in 1991 raised some £25 million and helped the company buy up development land at bargain prices.
▪ How might the Black-Scholes option pricing model be used to value rights issues? 10.
▪ There are animals rights issues, as exemplified by the SCID-mice.
movement
▪ So the civil rights movement began to splinter, and young blacks in particular followed more militant leaders.
▪ Johnson became committed to discrediting the civil rights movement and asked Hoover to provide the ammunition.
▪ All were later to be intensely involved in the civil rights movement.
▪ Up until the civil rights movement of the 1960s, they tended to marry only those from their own class and milieu.
▪ It provides a useful point of departure for a historian of the present-day civil rights movement in the Soviet Union.
▪ We all felt as though we had missed the civil rights movement.
▪ And on the Catholic side, older nationalist members were opposed by a younger generation raised in the civil rights movement.
▪ At this time, the civil rights movement was blooming, and the city felt racial tension.
property
▪ The action stems from a letter Apple sent Quorum lawyers on March 17 accusing it of infringing its intellectual property rights.
▪ Here are some of the main arguments for and against the private property rights bill.
▪ In addition to inadequate protection of intellectual property rights these included a range of import tariffs, import licensing and customs practices.
▪ The United States sees intellectual property rights as sacred, said Thomas Klitgaard, an attorney specializing in international law.
▪ Divorce may result in the loss of certain property rights.
▪ They reaffirm the importance of recognizing intellectual property rights.
▪ Contrast this with a Marxist view of property rights.
▪ Government is important because it can and should establish and enforce rules of conduct and protect property rights.
violations
▪ Romo says civil rights violations by the Border Patrol are rampant in Tucson.
■ VERB
assert
▪ Stickers are available throughout the county to help squeezed out pedestrians assert their rights.
▪ Lileikis has tried unsuccessfully to assert a Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination rather than answer allegations in the suit.
▪ Mrs Armitage's heir is already asserting his rights in the matter but that is not my concern.
▪ After he had gone his two sons asserted their right to the throne, and each tried to be made king.
▪ He is entitled to assert his supposed right on reasonably equal terms.
▪ It was an awkward way for Congress to assert its Constitutional right and duty to declare war.
▪ The conventional view, then as now, was that Lanfranc had carried all before him in asserting the rights of Canterbury.
▪ No arguments assert my right: The sun is behind me.
defend
▪ But it will defend equally vigorously the rights of women who choose to look after their children full-time.
▪ However, the liberal California court defended the right of teachers to petition for redress of grievances.
▪ Each of us is called to defend the rights of all.
▪ They were defending the right of the pamphleteer to publish ideas that were unpopular in society or inconvenient for the state.
▪ One threatened to call out the National Guard to defend Atlanta's water rights.
deny
▪ We do not seek to deny people their rights and benefits.
▪ Indignant, some rejected both questions as long as they were denied their constitutional rights.
▪ Mr. Beloff denies both of those rights.
▪ Granted, gay couples are denied the basic rights that heterosexual married couples enjoy.
▪ The Government would be powerless, having denied itself the right of access to the ordinary courts in such an eventuality.
▪ They deny their own law, denying my right, and the precedent is there to stead them in the next encroachment.
▪ The hostile reception of Alford's views led him to reflect that he was being denied the parliamentary right of free speech.
exercise
▪ One form of assent is the very act of claiming or exercising the right.
▪ On its face this seems to require the seller to exercise all three rights together.
▪ Descended from the Carolingian counts and vicomtes, they possessed and exercised very ancient rights of jurisdiction over their lordships.
▪ Do not be deterred from exercising your right of appeal by the belief that the outcome will be a foregone conclusion.
▪ Thus, on exercising his right of resale, the seller re-sells as owner.
▪ He may not exercise his rights or he may shirk his duties, but he can not forgo them.
▪ But just because adults have the right to choose, it does not follow that they have in fact exercised that right.
▪ Who are exercising their democratic rights?
give
▪ For instance, a background of turquoise card would not give the right feel to this picture at all.
▪ It must be remembered that the Nineteenth Amendment was adopted in 1920 to give women a constitutional right to vote.
▪ This, it is said, gives him a right to be part of the government.
▪ They try to give the children their rights, and protect the child.
▪ Leasehold reform to give new rights to owners of flats.
▪ The trend today, however, is for states to give teachers a limited right to strike.
▪ So in workouts, too, creditors may be willing to give up their seniority rights.
▪ If some one other than the buyer was injured by the goods, the Sale of Goods Act gives him no rights.
protect
▪ It remains the duty of governments to protect the rights of their citizens but this is evidently not enough.
▪ The attorney general responded that an indictment under federal law could be invoked only when a federally protected right was violated.
▪ We will abolish tax relief for private health insurance, whilst protecting the rights of existing policy-holders.
▪ He also asked Parliament for 5, 000, to put teeth into their promise of protecting his rights.
▪ New laws have been enacted to protect women's rights.
▪ Government is important because it can and should establish and enforce rules of conduct and protect property rights.
▪ This makes it all the more important that the lease should protect the landlord's right to future income from other operators.
▪ The Supreme Court should have recognized a constitutionally protected personal right to physician-assisted suicide of terminally ill individuals.
violate
▪ They said it also violates privacy rights by outlawing some expression within private e-mail correspondence between individuals.
▪ Federal officials began to violate the civil rights laws in addition to refusing to enforce them.
▪ Some one who knowingly touches another without his consent violates this personal right as surely as if he had taken his property.
▪ The state supreme court advised the governor that the law violated the First Amendment rights of teachers.
▪ He said the management's action violated the constitutional rights of the media in broadcasting news.
▪ They accused the law enforcement authorities of violating their civil rights by, among other things, fabricating evidence.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(from) left to right
▪ Below, left to right: Davey Philips of Clan Skates.
▪ Number them in sequence 1, 2, 3 etc, left to right on each line.
▪ Other winners are, left to right,.
▪ Run your finger along under the words as you read, so that the child learns that reading goes from left to right.
▪ The basic mechanism is to build an edge from left to right.
▪ The group photograph shows, from left to right:.
▪ Years ago, teams could pick up the free-agent menu and read it left to right.
(right) from the word go
▪ At the County Ground, the wolves were on the prowl right from the word go.
▪ I knew it was a deliberate attempt from the word go to bring the band down.
▪ In Damage, from Josephine Hart's novel, he gets more or less everything wrong from the word go.
▪ It was a nightmare from the word go.
▪ The marriage was a disaster from the word go, although I didn't realize this until it was all over.
▪ They are reflexes built into the system from the word go.
(right) under sb's nose
▪ Pat's car was stolen, almost from under his nose.
(right) up your street
▪ Mrs Marriot was a woman up our street who used to sell things in her front room.
▪ So, if that sounds up your street, get your Peak Performance subscription in soon!
▪ This sort of thing should be right up your street.
(right/as if) on cue
▪ And, as if on cue, I did.
▪ And, on cue, he heard the sound of hoofbeats ` on the wind.
▪ Dead on cue the runner hurries over to Eli to answer his question.
▪ Right on cue, a butterfly flew up to the plants we were looking at and landed!
▪ She passed a couple of groundskeepers, who turned as if on cue for a second look.
▪ She should have become angry with him for his persistence, on cue, but for some reason she didn't.
▪ The boys slashed, jumped, and shouted with enthusiasm and on cue.
▪ The sky, as if on cue, was overcast.
(straight/right) from the horse's mouth
God is in his heaven, all's right with the world
I'm all right Jack
Mr Right
a hard left/right
▪ I executed a hard right turn, but could not see any other aircraft in my vicinity.
▪ More often, though, they miss, hang a hard left, and return to the dugout.
▪ Sharp took an eight count after taking a hard left hook.
▪ Still not enough to justify this desire to reach across the table and deliver a hard right to the gubernatorial chin.
assert your rights/independence/superiority etc
▪ And the revolution in the structure of services and management meant elderly frail people found it increasingly difficult to assert their rights.
▪ Athens asserted her rights over her citizens temporarily exiled, as she did over those at home and liable for service.
▪ But she sought not so much to break a taboo as to assert her independence from the male yoke.
▪ Mrs Armitage's heir is already asserting his rights in the matter but that is not my concern.
▪ Power gives us the ability to control, to choose and to assert our independence.
▪ Stickers are available throughout the county to help squeezed out pedestrians assert their rights.
▪ You need to be selective and judge when it is appropriate to assert your rights.
at right angles (to sth)
▪ The aisles intersect at right angles to form the shape of a cross.
be (right) on the money
▪ Carson was right on the money when he said people are tired of big-shot politicians.
▪ That was a case when Jobs's vision was on the money.
be a bit of all right
be on the right/wrong track
▪ A few people, though, were on the right track.
▪ And other signs helped convince me that I was on the right track.
▪ Dole was on the right track when he talked about tolerance, but he mysteriously dropped it once he got the nomination.
▪ He hoped the man was on the right track and did his best to believe that he was.
▪ I knew I was on the right track when I felt that thrill of pleasure at placing object, not painting it.
▪ The officers consequently had little idea whether they were on the right track or not.
▪ You are on the right track so follow your nose.
bear right/left
Bear left where the road divides.
▪ The road bears to the right.
▪ After descending, bear left on to the grassy bridleway which joins the road.
▪ From St Martin's church bear left past Cwmyoy Farm.
▪ Go through gate then bear right across field heading for stile that can be seen on skyline.
▪ His eyes bore right through me.
▪ I came to the place in the road where you bear left to go down to the valley of Chimayo.
▪ On reaching the saddle bear right along the ridge to the summit.
▪ Stay on the main track, bearing left at the fork two miles in.
come good/right
▪ In both cases, prices came right back down within three months.
▪ It seemed clear Corbett wanted me to work at Salomon, but he never came right out and proposed.
▪ It will all come right, now that a different period of history has begun.
▪ More generally, the logistical strengths that the Dole campaign had counted on began to come good.
▪ Periodically, these letters come right out of the woodwork.
▪ Since I was the best spinner of my type in the world, eventually it would all come right.
▪ The light comes right through our curtains and makes sleeping difficult.
▪ The wasp took off as if in fright, but she came right back.
come right out with sth/come right out and say sth
coming (right) up!
do all right (for yourself/herself etc)
▪ Anyway, I did all right.
▪ He did all right in that Navy movie, whatever it was.
▪ Wow, so you guys must do all right then, him?
do sth right off the bat
▪ I asked him to help, and he said yes right off the bat.
▪ At least not right off the bat.
fork (off) left/right
▪ After 50yds fork right on to a track which climbs up Triscombe Combe.
▪ At the first fork they must go left and at the next fork right and so on until they were challenged.
▪ Then with a wave she forked left and was gone.
get (right) up sb's nose
▪ Darren comes to stay with Nikki and is quick to get up the nose of everyone he meets.
▪ Even reading your horoscope can get up your nose.
▪ I didn't realise it would get up your nose so quickly and so far.
▪ I took her to my room, so that her feathers wouldn't get up Mum's nose.
▪ It had got up Rufus's nose a bit, though Adam had a perfect right to do this.
get your priorities right
▪ Although you are in a seemingly hopeless situation, keep thinking and get your priorities right.
▪ Before we talk, I suggest we get our priorities right.
▪ Have we got our priorities right?
▪ Some people just can't get their priorities right!
go (right/clean) out of sb's mind
▪ She said she was going out of her mind in California.
hang a right/left
▪ Go straight on Vista for two blocks then hang a left.
▪ First, there is that bizarre enormous mythic metal fish that hangs right inside the doorway.
▪ I was just in time to see the Sierra hang a left once over the railway.
have a perfect right to do sth
▪ You have a perfect right to say "no" if you don't want to do it.
▪ They have a perfect right to object to it.
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
in the (right) ball park
it serves sb right
it'll be all right on the night
it's all right
▪ It's all right. Mommy's here now.
▪ I think it's all right.
▪ I will do the opposite, if it's all right by you-and always be glad you came.
▪ It's all right but he prefers Cabanaconda.
▪ It's all right, my darling, Mrs Jourdelay's driving us.
▪ Now, Benny, it's all right.
it's all right for sb
▪ But if it's all right for wives to have this status, then it's all right for cohabitees too.
▪ It's all right for you.
it's/that's all right
keep on the right side of sb
▪ But those wanting to keep on the right side of the law will have to steer clear of the grape.
▪ They were keeping on the right side of the powers that be.
lead sb a merry old dance/a right old dance
make (all) the right noises (about sth)
might is right
▪ Second, we need some kind of global bodies to prevent a further slide into a politics of might is right.
▪ What the child learns is that might is right.
no one in their right mind ...
on the right/wrong side of 30/40 etc
on the wrong/right side of the law
▪ De Niro plays a lawyer, on the right side of the law.
play your cards right
▪ If you play your cards right, you might get them to reduce the price.
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
play your cards right
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
prescriptive right
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
put sb straight/right
put sth right
▪ Larson has promised to put the city's finances right by the end of the year.
quite right
▪ But this is not quite right.
▪ Distracted vicars want action against the furry little pests, and quite right too.
▪ He was even happy to agree when Louise suggested that the buttons on the jacket were not quite right.
▪ If he thinks something isn't quite right he tells me.
▪ It is quite right that members sensitivities should be aired.
▪ Not quite right, not quite plain enough or narrow enough, but getting there.
▪ Now that is very wrong, and yet, somehow, quite right.
▪ They'd shared a bed in Cumberland and she had comforted Gordon because nothing was quite right.
reserve the right to do sth
▪ The management reserves the right to refuse admission.
▪ Gazette reserves the right to publish at our discretion a photograph of the prize winner. 6.
▪ Human beings reserve the right to alter and change views.
▪ The editor reserves the right to select and edit questions.
▪ The Regional Council reserves the right to augment these observations in reply to the grounds of appeal.
▪ These charges and interest rates are variable and the Bank reserves the right to amend them from time to time.
▪ This must be returned within five days, otherwise we reserve the right to cancel the contract.
▪ We reserve the right to edit letters.
right of abode
▪ That is six times the number to be offered the right of abode in the government's package.
▪ The 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act changed this, and only those born in Britain were henceforth automatically given the right of abode.
▪ This would have allowed the right of abode to all citizens in any part of the country.
right up/down sb's alley
▪ The job sounds right up your alley.
▪ She said, I will tell you this Bobby Kennedy is right up my alley.
right/left justified
▪ Numeric quantities can be printed left justified by preceding them with a semi-colon.
sb would give their right arm to do sth
▪ These parents would give their right arms to get their kids into a prestigious school.
sb's heart is in the right place
▪ He can be rude and bad-tempered sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
▪ Mike's a little grouchy sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
see sb right
set sb straight/right
▪ Someone had to set Dave straight on company policies and procedures.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
sharp left/right
▪ For this you turn sharp right off the road from Saint-Jean to Saint-Palais, about half-way between those two towns.
▪ Pass over a broken wall and turn sharp right.
▪ She walked almost to the edge of the cliff, where the road made a sharp left.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ Turn sharp left 80yds before a conifer windbreak.
▪ Turn sharp right downhill and uphill to go through another gate.
▪ Turn left along this road for three quarters of a mile until the road turns sharp right to become Marsh Road.
▪ We made a rocky, wet entry, and then took a sharp right turn along a wall.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
take the words (right) out of sb's mouth
that's quite all right
the far left/right
▪ For now, at least, the cause of tax simplification seems to have been captured by the far right.
▪ He unplugged the cables, shoved all the levers over to the far left, and rewound the tape.
▪ However, the fact that the far right won more votes than the far-left should make everyone pause and reflect.
▪ That Begin had come from the far right, but that in order to govern he has to occupy the center.
▪ The activities of the far right have been a cause for concern over here for a while now.
▪ The good tee shot was played to the far right of the fairway to set up a second shot to the left.
▪ The libertarian view A third view of the revolution has been developed by writers on the far Left of the political spectrum.
▪ The top of the hierarchy is at the far left.
the hard left/right
▪ But what happens when you want so much to be right, you end up helping the hard right?
▪ Labour moderates win over four of the hard left by agreeing that the cuts shall involve as few compulsory redundancies as possible.
▪ Mr Steve King, leader of the hard left, denounces his fellow-councillors as dunderheads, nincompoops and dolts.
▪ The showing for the hard left was disappointing.
▪ They were stars of the hard left, but we have heard little about them during the election struggle.
▪ Too little, say the Tories, too much says the hard left.
the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing
the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing
the religious right
tick all the right boxes
top left/right/centre
▪ A slightly larger percentage of pairs of brooches were more abraded on the top right than the top left corner.
▪ Here we want the Series in a column so check Columns in the box at the top left.
▪ The completed board is shown top left.
▪ The dark area in the top right is deep, clear water.
▪ The file was a standard office file with a Prior, Keen, Baldwin label stuck in the top right corner.
▪ The majority of single brooches examined were found to be more abraded on the top left corner than the top right.
▪ The plane again runs roughly from top left to bottom right.
▪ Using a tapestry needle threaded with the embroidery colour, begin at the top right of the motif.
two wrongs don't make a right
would give anything/a lot/your right arm etc for sth
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Everyone the right to a good basic education.
▪ Free speech is a basic right in a democratic society.
▪ I disagree, but I respect his right to his opinion.
▪ I urged her time and again to do what's right.
▪ Leonard counters with a right to the jaw.
▪ She always tried to teach her children the difference between right and wrong.
▪ The executive council has the right of veto over the management's policy.
▪ Women all over the world fought long and hard for the right to vote.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Discrimination remedies too require re-thinking and the challenge of enacting disability employment rights provides a timely opportunity to do so.
▪ Now they are trying to end our verbal and tactile rights.
▪ Segregationist violence, arson, and murders of civil rights workers for trying to exercise constitutional rights continued unabated.
▪ This was an important right, because business agents assigned the jobs.
▪ Undecided voters split 49 percent in favor of abortion rights, 41 percent opposed.
V.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
abortion
▪ A lot of abortion rights supporters also breathed a premature sigh of relief.
left
▪ Eyes shifted from left to right and people shuffled a little in their places.
▪ Stand with feet firmly on the ground, twist body from left to right.
wrong
▪ A strange, mystical story of love, faith, and the righting of an old wrong.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(from) left to right
▪ Below, left to right: Davey Philips of Clan Skates.
▪ Number them in sequence 1, 2, 3 etc, left to right on each line.
▪ Other winners are, left to right,.
▪ Run your finger along under the words as you read, so that the child learns that reading goes from left to right.
▪ The basic mechanism is to build an edge from left to right.
▪ The group photograph shows, from left to right:.
▪ Years ago, teams could pick up the free-agent menu and read it left to right.
(right) from the word go
▪ At the County Ground, the wolves were on the prowl right from the word go.
▪ I knew it was a deliberate attempt from the word go to bring the band down.
▪ In Damage, from Josephine Hart's novel, he gets more or less everything wrong from the word go.
▪ It was a nightmare from the word go.
▪ The marriage was a disaster from the word go, although I didn't realize this until it was all over.
▪ They are reflexes built into the system from the word go.
(right) under sb's nose
▪ Pat's car was stolen, almost from under his nose.
(right) up your street
▪ Mrs Marriot was a woman up our street who used to sell things in her front room.
▪ So, if that sounds up your street, get your Peak Performance subscription in soon!
▪ This sort of thing should be right up your street.
(right/as if) on cue
▪ And, as if on cue, I did.
▪ And, on cue, he heard the sound of hoofbeats ` on the wind.
▪ Dead on cue the runner hurries over to Eli to answer his question.
▪ Right on cue, a butterfly flew up to the plants we were looking at and landed!
▪ She passed a couple of groundskeepers, who turned as if on cue for a second look.
▪ She should have become angry with him for his persistence, on cue, but for some reason she didn't.
▪ The boys slashed, jumped, and shouted with enthusiasm and on cue.
▪ The sky, as if on cue, was overcast.
(straight/right) from the horse's mouth
God is in his heaven, all's right with the world
I'm all right Jack
Mr Right
a hard left/right
▪ I executed a hard right turn, but could not see any other aircraft in my vicinity.
▪ More often, though, they miss, hang a hard left, and return to the dugout.
▪ Sharp took an eight count after taking a hard left hook.
▪ Still not enough to justify this desire to reach across the table and deliver a hard right to the gubernatorial chin.
at right angles (to sth)
▪ The aisles intersect at right angles to form the shape of a cross.
be (right) on the money
▪ Carson was right on the money when he said people are tired of big-shot politicians.
▪ That was a case when Jobs's vision was on the money.
be a bit of all right
be on the right/wrong track
▪ A few people, though, were on the right track.
▪ And other signs helped convince me that I was on the right track.
▪ Dole was on the right track when he talked about tolerance, but he mysteriously dropped it once he got the nomination.
▪ He hoped the man was on the right track and did his best to believe that he was.
▪ I knew I was on the right track when I felt that thrill of pleasure at placing object, not painting it.
▪ The officers consequently had little idea whether they were on the right track or not.
▪ You are on the right track so follow your nose.
do all right (for yourself/herself etc)
▪ Anyway, I did all right.
▪ He did all right in that Navy movie, whatever it was.
▪ Wow, so you guys must do all right then, him?
do sth right off the bat
▪ I asked him to help, and he said yes right off the bat.
▪ At least not right off the bat.
get (right) up sb's nose
▪ Darren comes to stay with Nikki and is quick to get up the nose of everyone he meets.
▪ Even reading your horoscope can get up your nose.
▪ I didn't realise it would get up your nose so quickly and so far.
▪ I took her to my room, so that her feathers wouldn't get up Mum's nose.
▪ It had got up Rufus's nose a bit, though Adam had a perfect right to do this.
get your priorities right
▪ Although you are in a seemingly hopeless situation, keep thinking and get your priorities right.
▪ Before we talk, I suggest we get our priorities right.
▪ Have we got our priorities right?
▪ Some people just can't get their priorities right!
go (right/clean) out of sb's mind
▪ She said she was going out of her mind in California.
have a perfect right to do sth
▪ You have a perfect right to say "no" if you don't want to do it.
▪ They have a perfect right to object to it.
have the right idea
▪ The new superintendent has the right idea about attacking illiteracy, but the wrong method.
▪ Mrs Donaldson, in last month's letters page, certainly seems to have the right idea.
▪ The young lads have the right idea.
have your head screwed on (straight/right)
▪ Cloughie probably gets closest to it - not he himself but the No. 9 seems to have his head screwed on.
▪ She seemed to have her head screwed on right, even if she was a girl.
hit/strike the right/wrong note
▪ He reworked everything he wrote until he had hit the right note of Gailic pedantry.
▪ So are buskers in Gloucester striking the right note with their audience?
▪ That would have the merit of simplicity, but would it strike the right note socially?
in the (right) ball park
it'll be all right on the night
it's all right
▪ It's all right. Mommy's here now.
▪ I think it's all right.
▪ I will do the opposite, if it's all right by you-and always be glad you came.
▪ It's all right but he prefers Cabanaconda.
▪ It's all right, my darling, Mrs Jourdelay's driving us.
▪ Now, Benny, it's all right.
it's all right for sb
▪ But if it's all right for wives to have this status, then it's all right for cohabitees too.
▪ It's all right for you.
it's/that's all right
keep on the right side of sb
▪ But those wanting to keep on the right side of the law will have to steer clear of the grape.
▪ They were keeping on the right side of the powers that be.
left-footed/right-footed
make (all) the right noises (about sth)
might is right
▪ Second, we need some kind of global bodies to prevent a further slide into a politics of might is right.
▪ What the child learns is that might is right.
no one in their right mind ...
on the right/wrong side of 30/40 etc
on the wrong/right side of the law
▪ De Niro plays a lawyer, on the right side of the law.
play your cards right
▪ If you play your cards right, you might get them to reduce the price.
▪ Oh, no - she knew how to play her cards right.
▪ The domino effect can work for us as well as against us if we play our cards right.
▪ This could all turn out for the best if he played his cards right.
prescriptive right
press/push (all) the right buttons
▪ He pushed all the right buttons.
▪ These are words which are all designed to press the right buttons among women voters.
quite right
▪ But this is not quite right.
▪ Distracted vicars want action against the furry little pests, and quite right too.
▪ He was even happy to agree when Louise suggested that the buttons on the jacket were not quite right.
▪ If he thinks something isn't quite right he tells me.
▪ It is quite right that members sensitivities should be aired.
▪ Not quite right, not quite plain enough or narrow enough, but getting there.
▪ Now that is very wrong, and yet, somehow, quite right.
▪ They'd shared a bed in Cumberland and she had comforted Gordon because nothing was quite right.
right of abode
▪ That is six times the number to be offered the right of abode in the government's package.
▪ The 1962 Commonwealth Immigrants Act changed this, and only those born in Britain were henceforth automatically given the right of abode.
▪ This would have allowed the right of abode to all citizens in any part of the country.
right up/down sb's alley
▪ The job sounds right up your alley.
▪ She said, I will tell you this Bobby Kennedy is right up my alley.
right/left justified
▪ Numeric quantities can be printed left justified by preceding them with a semi-colon.
sb would give their right arm to do sth
▪ These parents would give their right arms to get their kids into a prestigious school.
sb's heart is in the right place
▪ He can be rude and bad-tempered sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
▪ Mike's a little grouchy sometimes, but his heart's in the right place.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
sharp left/right
▪ For this you turn sharp right off the road from Saint-Jean to Saint-Palais, about half-way between those two towns.
▪ Pass over a broken wall and turn sharp right.
▪ She walked almost to the edge of the cliff, where the road made a sharp left.
▪ There was a sharp left turn at the bottom into Ruskin Road.
▪ Turn sharp left 80yds before a conifer windbreak.
▪ Turn sharp right downhill and uphill to go through another gate.
▪ Turn left along this road for three quarters of a mile until the road turns sharp right to become Marsh Road.
▪ We made a rocky, wet entry, and then took a sharp right turn along a wall.
start/get off on the wrong/right foot
take the words (right) out of sb's mouth
that's quite all right
the far left/right
▪ For now, at least, the cause of tax simplification seems to have been captured by the far right.
▪ He unplugged the cables, shoved all the levers over to the far left, and rewound the tape.
▪ However, the fact that the far right won more votes than the far-left should make everyone pause and reflect.
▪ That Begin had come from the far right, but that in order to govern he has to occupy the center.
▪ The activities of the far right have been a cause for concern over here for a while now.
▪ The good tee shot was played to the far right of the fairway to set up a second shot to the left.
▪ The libertarian view A third view of the revolution has been developed by writers on the far Left of the political spectrum.
▪ The top of the hierarchy is at the far left.
the hard left/right
▪ But what happens when you want so much to be right, you end up helping the hard right?
▪ Labour moderates win over four of the hard left by agreeing that the cuts shall involve as few compulsory redundancies as possible.
▪ Mr Steve King, leader of the hard left, denounces his fellow-councillors as dunderheads, nincompoops and dolts.
▪ The showing for the hard left was disappointing.
▪ They were stars of the hard left, but we have heard little about them during the election struggle.
▪ Too little, say the Tories, too much says the hard left.
the left hand does not know what the right hand is doing
the left hand doesn't know what the right hand is doing
the religious right
top left/right/centre
▪ A slightly larger percentage of pairs of brooches were more abraded on the top right than the top left corner.
▪ Here we want the Series in a column so check Columns in the box at the top left.
▪ The completed board is shown top left.
▪ The dark area in the top right is deep, clear water.
▪ The file was a standard office file with a Prior, Keen, Baldwin label stuck in the top right corner.
▪ The majority of single brooches examined were found to be more abraded on the top left corner than the top right.
▪ The plane again runs roughly from top left to bottom right.
▪ Using a tapestry needle threaded with the embroidery colour, begin at the top right of the motif.
two wrongs don't make a right
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A tow truck was called to attempt to right the trailer.
▪ Keating promised to right the country's troubled economy.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After righting the canoe and dumping out the water on shore, I paddled the boat to pick up Mangelsdorf.
▪ He righted his spectacles which had been knocked askew and straightened his cloak.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Right

Right \Right\ (r[imac]t), a. [OE. right, riht, AS. riht; akin to D. regt, OS. & OHG. reht, G. recht, Dan. ret, Sw. r["a]tt, Icel. r["e]ttr, Goth. ra['i]hts, L. rectus, p. p. of regere to guide, rule; cf. Skr. [.r]ju straight, right. [root]115. Cf. Adroit, Alert, Correct, Dress, Regular, Rector, Recto, Rectum, Regent, Region, Realm, Rich, Royal, Rule.]

  1. Straight; direct; not crooked; as, a right line. ``Right as any line.''
    --Chaucer

  2. Upright; erect from a base; having an upright axis; not oblique; as, right ascension; a right pyramid or cone.

  3. Conformed to the constitution of man and the will of God, or to justice and equity; not deviating from the true and just; according with truth and duty; just; true. That which is conformable to the Supreme Rule is absolutely right, and is called right simply without relation to a special end. --Whately. 2. Fit; suitable; proper; correct; becoming; as, the right man in the right place; the right way from London to Oxford. 5. Characterized by reality or genuineness; real; actual; not spurious. ``His right wife.'' --Chaucer. In this battle, . . . the Britons never more plainly manifested themselves to be right barbarians. --Milton. 6. According with truth; passing a true judgment; conforming to fact or intent; not mistaken or wrong; not erroneous; correct; as, this is the right faith. You are right, Justice, and you weigh this well. --Shak. If there be no prospect beyond the grave, the inference is . . . right, ``Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.'' --Locke. 7. Most favorable or convenient; fortunate. The lady has been disappointed on the right side. --Spectator. 8. Of or pertaining to that side of the body in man on which the muscular action is usually stronger than on the other side; -- opposed to left when used in reference to a part of the body; as, the right side, hand, arm. Also applied to the corresponding side of the lower animals. Became the sovereign's favorite, his right hand. --Longfellow. Note: In designating the banks of a river, right and left are used always with reference to the position of one who is facing in the direction of the current's flow. 9. Well placed, disposed, or adjusted; orderly; well regulated; correctly done. 10. Designed to be placed or worn outward; as, the right side of a piece of cloth. At right angles, so as to form a right angle or right angles, as when one line crosses another perpendicularly. Right and left, in both or all directions. [Colloq.] Right and left coupling (Pipe fitting), a coupling the opposite ends of which are tapped for a right-handed screw and a left-handed screw, respectivelly. Right angle.

    1. The angle formed by one line meeting another perpendicularly, as the angles ABD, DBC.

    2. (Spherics) A spherical angle included between the axes of two great circles whose planes are perpendicular to each other.

      Right ascension. See under Ascension.

      Right Center (Politics), those members belonging to the Center in a legislative assembly who have sympathies with the Right on political questions. See Center, n., 5.

      Right cone, Right cylinder, Right prism, Right pyramid (Geom.), a cone, cylinder, prism, or pyramid, the axis of which is perpendicular to the base.

      Right line. See under Line.

      Right sailing (Naut.), sailing on one of the four cardinal points, so as to alter a ship's latitude or its longitude, but not both.
      --Ham. Nav. Encyc.

      Right sphere (Astron. & Geol.), a sphere in such a position that the equator cuts the horizon at right angles; in spherical projections, that position of the sphere in which the primitive plane coincides with the plane of the equator.

      Note: Right is used elliptically for it is right, what you say is right, true.

      ``Right,'' cries his lordship.
      --Pope.

      Syn: Straight; direct; perpendicular; upright; lawful; rightful; true; correct; just; equitable; proper; suitable; becoming.

Right

Right \Right\, v. i.

  1. To recover the proper or natural condition or position; to become upright.

  2. (Naut.) Hence, to regain an upright position, as a ship or boat, after careening.

Right

Right \Right\, adv.

  1. In a right manner.

  2. In a right or straight line; directly; hence; straightway; immediately; next; as, he stood right before me; it went right to the mark; he came right out; he followed right after the guide.

    Unto Dian's temple goeth she right.
    --Chaucer.

    Let thine eyes look right on.
    --Prov. iv. 25.

    Right across its track there lay, Down in the water, a long reef of gold.
    --Tennyson.

  3. Exactly; just. [Obs. or Colloq.]

    Came he right now to sing a raven's note?
    --Shak.

  4. According to the law or will of God; conforming to the standard of truth and justice; righteously; as, to live right; to judge right.

  5. According to any rule of art; correctly.

    You with strict discipline instructed right.
    --Roscommon.

  6. According to fact or truth; actually; truly; really; correctly; exactly; as, to tell a story right. ``Right at mine own cost.''
    --Chaucer.

    Right as it were a steed of Lumbardye.
    --Chaucer.

    His wounds so smarted that he slept right naught.
    --Fairfax.

  7. In a great degree; very; wholly; unqualifiedly; extremely; highly; as, right humble; right noble; right valiant. ``He was not right fat''.
    --Chaucer.

    For which I should be right sorry.
    --Tyndale.

    [I] return those duties back as are right fit.
    --Shak.

    Note: In this sense now chiefly prefixed to titles; as, right honorable; right reverend.

    Right honorable, a title given in England to peers and peeresses, to the eldest sons and all daughters of such peers as have rank above viscounts, and to all privy councilors; also, to certain civic officers, as the lord mayor of London, of York, and of Dublin.

    Note: Right is used in composition with other adverbs, as upright, downright, forthright, etc.

    Right along, without cessation; continuously; as, to work right along for several hours. [Colloq. U.S.]

    Right away, or Right off, at once; straightway; without delay. [Colloq. U.S.] ``We will . . . shut ourselves up in the office and do the work right off.''
    --D. Webster.

Right

Right \Right\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Righted; p. pr. & vb. n. Righting.] [AS. rihtan. See Right, a.]

  1. To bring or restore to the proper or natural position; to set upright; to make right or straight (that which has been wrong or crooked); to correct.

  2. To do justice to; to relieve from wrong; to restore rights to; to assert or regain the rights of; as, to right the oppressed; to right one's self; also, to vindicate.

    So just is God, to right the innocent.
    --Shak.

    All experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
    --Jefferson.

    To right a vessel (Naut.), to restore her to an upright position after careening.

    To right the helm (Naut.), to place it in line with the keel.

Right

Right \Right\, n. [AS. right. See Right, a.]

  1. That which is right or correct. Specifically:

    1. The straight course; adherence to duty; obedience to lawful authority, divine or human; freedom from guilt, -- the opposite of moral wrong.

    2. A true statement; freedom from error of falsehood; adherence to truth or fact.

      Seldom your opinions err; Your eyes are always in the right.
      --Prior.

    3. A just judgment or action; that which is true or proper; justice; uprightness; integrity.

      Long love to her has borne the faithful knight, And well deserved, had fortune done him right.
      --Dryden.

  2. That to which one has a just claim. Specifically:

    1. That which one has a natural claim to exact.

      There are no rights whatever, without corresponding duties.
      --Coleridge.

    2. That which one has a legal or social claim to do or to exact; legal power; authority; as, a sheriff has a right to arrest a criminal.

    3. That which justly belongs to one; that which one has a claim to possess or own; the interest or share which anyone has in a piece of property; title; claim; interest; ownership.

      Born free, he sought his right.
      --Dryden.

      Hast thou not right to all created things?
      --Milton.

      Men have no right to what is not reasonable.
      --Burke.

    4. Privilege or immunity granted by authority.

  3. The right side; the side opposite to the left.

    Led her to the Souldan's right.
    --Spenser.

  4. In some legislative bodies of Europe (as in France), those members collectively who are conservatives or monarchists. See Center,

  5. 5. The outward or most finished surface, as of a piece of cloth, a carpet, etc. At all right, at all points; in all respects. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Bill of rights, a list of rights; a paper containing a declaration of rights, or the declaration itself. See under Bill. By right, By rights, or By good rights, rightly; properly; correctly. He should himself use it by right. --Chaucer. I should have been a woman by right. --Shak. Divine right, or Divine right of kings, a name given to the patriarchal theory of government, especially to the doctrine that no misconduct and no dispossession can forfeit the right of a monarch or his heirs to the throne, and to the obedience of the people. To rights.

    1. In a direct line; straight. [R.]
      --Woodward.

    2. At once; directly. [Obs. or Colloq.]
      --Swift.

      To set to rights, To put to rights, to put in good order; to adjust; to regulate, as what is out of order.

      Writ of right (Law), a writ which lay to recover lands in fee simple, unjustly withheld from the true owner.
      --Blackstone.

WordNet

right

  1. v. make reparations or amends for; "right a wrongs done to the victims of the Holocaust" [syn: compensate, redress, correct] [ant: wrong]

  2. put in or restore to an upright position; "They righted the sailboat that had capsized"

  3. regain an upright or proper position; "The capsized boat righted again"

  4. make right or correct; "Correct the mistakes"; "rectify the calculation" [syn: correct, rectify] [ant: falsify]

right

  1. adj. free from error; especially conforming to fact or truth; "the correct answer"; "the correct version"; "the right answer"; "took the right road"; "the right decision" [syn: correct] [ant: incorrect, incorrect]

  2. being or located on or directed toward the side of the body to the east when facing north; "my right hand"; "right center field"; "a right-hand turn"; "the right bank of a river is the bank on your right side when you are facing downstream" [ant: left]

  3. socially right or correct; "it isn't right to leave the party without saying goodbye"; "correct behavior" [syn: correct]

  4. in conformance with justice or law or morality; "do the right thing and confess" [ant: wrong]

  5. correct in opinion or judgment; "time proved him right" [syn: correct] [ant: wrong]

  6. appropriate for a condition or occasion; "everything in its proper place"; "the right man for the job"; "she is not suitable for the position" [syn: proper, suitable]

  7. of or belonging to the political or intellectual right [ant: left, center]

  8. in or into a satisfactory condition; "things are right again now"; "put things right"

  9. intended for the right hand; "a right-hand glove" [syn: right(a), right-hand(a)]

  10. in accord with accepted standards of usage or procedure; "what's the right word for this?"; "the right way to open oysters" [syn: correct]

  11. having the axis perpendicular to the base; "a right angle"

  12. of the side of cloth or clothing intended to face outward; "the right side of the cloth showed the pattern"; "be sure your shirt is right side out" [syn: right(a)]

  13. most suitable or right for a particular purpose; "a good time to plant tomatoes"; "the right time to act"; "the time is ripe for great sociological changes" [syn: good, ripe]

right

  1. n. an abstract idea of that which is due to a person or governmental body by law or tradition or nature; "they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights"; "Certain rights can never be granted to the government but must be kept in the hands of the people"- Eleanor Roosevelt; "a right is not something that somebody gives you; it is something that nobody can take away"

  2. (frequently plural) the interest possessed by law or custom in some intangible thing; "mineral rights"; "film rights"

  3. location near or direction toward the right side; i.e. the side to the south when a person or object faces east; "he stood on the right" [ant: left]

  4. a turn to the right; "take a right at the corner"

  5. those who support political or social or economic conservatism; those who believe that things are better left unchanged [syn: right wing]

  6. anything in accord with principles of justice; "he feels he is in the right"; "the rightfulness of his claim" [syn: rightfulness] [ant: wrong, wrong]

  7. the hand that is on the right side of the body; "he writes with his right hand but pitches with his left"; "hit him with quick rights to the body" [syn: right hand]

  8. the piece of ground in the outfield on the catcher's right [syn: right field]

right

  1. adv. precisely, exactly; "stand right here!"

  2. immediately; "she called right after dinner"

  3. exactly; "he fell flop on his face" [syn: flop]

  4. toward or on the right; also used figuratively; "he looked right and left"; "the party has moved right" [ant: left]

  5. in the right manner; "please do your job properly!"; "can't you carry me decent?" [syn: properly, decently, decent, in good order, the right way] [ant: improperly]

  6. an interjection expressing agreement [syn: right on]

  7. completely; "she felt right at home"; "he fell right into the trap"

  8. (Southern regional intensive) very; "the baby is mighty cute"; "he's mighty tired"; "it is powerful humid"; "that boy is powerful big now"; "they have a right nice place" [syn: mighty, powerful]

  9. in accordance with moral or social standards; "that serves him right"; "do right by him" [syn: justly]

  10. in a correct manner; "he guessed right" [syn: correctly, aright] [ant: incorrectly, incorrectly]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

right

Old English rihtan "to straighten, rule, set up, set right, amend; guide, govern; restore, replace," from riht (adj.); see right (adj.1). Compare Old Norse retta "to straighten," Old Saxon rihtian, Old Frisian riuchta, German richten, Gothic garaihtjan. Related: Righted; righting.

right

Old English riht (West Saxon, Kentish), reht (Anglian), "that which is morally right, duty, obligation," also "rule of conduct; law of a land;" also "what someone deserves; a just claim, what is due; correctness, truth; a legal entitlement, a privilege," from the root of right (adj.1). Meaning "the right" (as opposed to the left) is from mid-13c.; political use from 1825. From early 14c. as "a right action, a good deed." Meaning "a blow with the right fist" is from 1898. The phrase to rights "at once, straightway" is 1660s, from sense "in a proper manner" (Middle English).

right

Old English rehte, rihte "in a straight or direct manner," from right (adj.1). Right on! as an exclamation of approval first recorded 1925 in black slang, popularized mid-1960s by Black Panther movement.

right

"morally correct," Old English riht "just, good, fair; proper, fitting; straight, not bent, direct, erect," from Proto-Germanic *rekhtaz (cognates: Old Frisian riucht "right," Old Saxon reht, Middle Dutch and Dutch recht, Old High German reht, German recht, Old Norse rettr, Gothic raihts), from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," also "to rule, to lead straight, to put right" (see regal; cognates: Greek orektos "stretched out, upright;" Latin rectus "straight, right;" Old Persian rasta- "straight, right," aršta- "rectitude;" Old Irish recht "law;" Welsh rhaith, Breton reiz "just, righteous, wise").\n

\nCompare slang straight (adj.1) "honest, morally upright," and Latin rectus "right," literally "straight," Lithuanian teisus "right, true," literally "straight." Greek dikaios "just" (in the moral and legal sense) is from dike "custom." As an emphatic, meaning "you are right," it is recorded from 1580s; use as a question meaning "am I not right?" is from 1961. The sense in right whale is "justly entitled to the name." Right stuff "best human ingredients" is from 1848, popularized by Tom Wolfe's 1979 book about the first astronauts. Right of way is attested from 1767. Right angle is from late 14c.

right

"opposite of left," early 12c., riht, from Old English riht, which did not have this sense but meant "good, proper, fitting, straight" (see right (adj.1)). The notion is of the right hand as the "correct" hand. The usual Old English word for this was swiþra, literally "stronger." "The history of words for 'right' and 'left' shows that they were used primarily with reference to the hands" [Buck]. Similar sense evolution in Dutch recht, German recht "right (not left)," from Old High German reht, which meant only "straight, just."\n

\nThe usual PIE root (*dek-) is represented by Latin dexter (see dexterity). Other derivations on a similar pattern to English right are French droit, from Latin directus "straight;" Lithuanian labas, literally "good;" and Slavic words (Bohemian pravy, Polish prawy, Russian pravyj) from Old Church Slavonic pravu, literally "straight," from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) "forward, through" (see per).\n

\nThe political sense of "conservative" is first recorded 1794 (adj.), 1825 (n.), a translation of French Droit "the Right, Conservative Party" in the French National Assembly (1789; see left (adj.)).

Wiktionary

right

Etymology 1

  1. 1 (context archaic English) straight, not bent. 2 Of an angle, having a size of 90 degrees, or one quarter of a complete rotation; the angle between two perpendicular lines. 3 Complying with justice, correctness or reason; correct, just, true. 4 appropriate, perfectly suitable; fit for purpose. 5 healthy, sane, competent. 6 Real; veritable. 7 (context Australia English) all right; not requiring assistance. 8 (context dated English) Most favourable or convenient; fortunate. adv. 1 On the right side. 2 Towards the right side. interj. 1 Yes, that is correct; I agree. 2 I agree with whatever you say; I have no opinion. 3 (non-gloss definition signpost Signpost word to change the subject in a discussion or discourse). 4 (non-gloss definition: Used to check agreement at the end of an utterance). 5 (non-gloss definition: Used to add seriousness or decisiveness before a statement.) n. 1 That which complies with justice, law or reason. 2 A legal or moral entitlement. Etymology 2

    adv. exactly, precisely. v

  2. 1 To correct. 2 To set upright. 3 (context intransitive English) To return to normal upright position. 4 To do justice to; to relieve from wrong; to restore rights to; to assert or regain the rights of.

Wikipedia

Right (disambiguation)

A right is a legal or moral entitlement or permission.

Right may also refer to:

  • Right (direction), the relative direction opposite of left
  • Right-wing politics
  • Far-right politics
  • Hard right, political perspective
  • The Right (Italy) (Italian: La Destra), a political party in Italy
  • Morally right, the opposite of wrong
  • "Right" (David Bowie song), a 1975 song from the album Young Americans

Usage examples of "right".

I am charged with aiding and abetting his escape it seems to me that I have a right to know who he is.

At the same time, the desperation I heard in some voices made me wonder if Natch had been right to question our ability to make changes.

She whirled, her right hand raised, but before she could use the controlling ring she lay sprawled on the floor, one side of her face ablaze from the blow of a phantom hand.

That fecundation sometimes takes place from right to left and thus produces these abnormal variations.

Despite the gentle ribbing from James he was here because his men were aboard that ship and they had the right to expect his best efforts to aid them.

I fear we will be as far aneath the right medium for a while, as ye are startit aboon it.

Former NATO general Wesley Clark was only slightly more explicit than all the other Democratic candidates for president, saying a woman should be free to abort her baby right up until the moment of birth.

The central issue was whether Roe had a right to abort her baby although her life was not at risk.

A small area of abrasion or contusion was on the cheek near the right ear, and a prominent dried abrasion was on the lower left side of the neck.

Two officers of the United States navy were walking abreast, unguarded and alone, not looking to the right or left, never frowning, never flinching, while the mob screamed in their ears, shook cocked pistols in their faces, cursed, crowded, and gnashed upon them.

Five minutes later the Lackawanna, Captain Marchand, going at full speed, delivered her blow also at right angles on the port side, abreast the after end of the armored superstructure.

The Constitution does not authorize Congress to enlarge or abridge those rights.

A State statute which forbids bodies of men to associate together as military organizations, or to drill or parade with arms in cities and towns unless authorized by law, does not abridge the right of the people to keep and bear arms.

To punish the exercise of this right to discuss public affairs or to penalize it through libel judgments is to abridge or shut off discussion of the very kind most needed.

Black and Brennan had always believed that the Constitution guaranteed all those rights to American citizens and that state legislatures could not abridge them.