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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

drug

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a banned substance/drug (=a drug that people competing in a sport are not allowed to take because it improves their performance)
a drug test (=to find out if someone has taken drugs)
▪ Two athletes were banned from competing after failing drug tests.
a miracle drug (=a very effective drug that cures a serious disease)
▪ Why is this new miracle drug so expensive?
a murder/burglary/drugs etc charge
▪ He appeared in court on fraud charges.
▪ Robins was in jail awaiting trial on drugs charges.
a patient receives treatment/a drug
▪ Twelve of these patients were receiving treatment with a new drug.
a prescription drug/medicine
▪ Not everyone can afford the cost of prescription drugs.
a sex/drug/terrorist etc offence
▪ Thirty-three people were charged with drug offences.
abuse alcohol/drugs
▪ The proportion of drinkers who abuse alcohol is actually quite small.
alcohol/drug abuse (=the practice of drinking too much or taking illegal drugs)
antiretroviral drug
arms/oil/drug etc shipment
▪ an illegal arms shipment
combination drug therapies
▪ new combination drug therapies
controlled drugs (=a drug that is illegal to have without permission from a doctor)
▪ a police search for controlled drugs
crime/drug etc kingpin
▪ a mafia kingpin
designer drug
drug addict
drug baron
drug barons
drug barons
drug bust
▪ a drug bust
drug czar
drug dealer
drug rehabilitation
drug runner
drug takers
▪ treatment for drug takers
drug/alcohol misuse
▪ Children who begin smoking when young are at greater risk from drugs misuse.
drug/alcohol use
▪ Drug use among teenage boys is on the increase.
drug/heroin/alcohol etc addiction
drug/heroin/morphine etc addict
▪ a recovering heroin addict
drugs/fraud/vice etc squad
▪ A controlled explosion was carried out by bomb squad officers.
drugs/gambling/smuggling etc racket
▪ Police believe he is involved in an international smuggling racket.
fertility drug
gateway drug
generic drugs
got busted for drugs
▪ Davis got busted for drugs.
hard drugs
illegal drugs
▪ She was found guilty of possession of illegal drugs.
illicit drugs
illicit drugs
lifesaving surgery/treatment/drugs etc
▪ The boy needs a life-saving transplant operation.
peddling drugs
▪ They were accused of peddling drugs.
soft drug
take drugs (=take illegal drugs)
▪ Most teenagers start taking drugs through boredom.
the drug scene (=taking illegal drugs)
▪ He regrets getting caught up in the drug scene.
the drugs/slave trade
▪ the country’s thriving drugs trade
truth drug
turn to drink/crime/drugs etc
▪ addicts who turn to crime to finance their habit
under the influence of alcohol/drink/drugs etc
▪ He was accused of driving while under the influence of alcohol.
wonder drug
▪ a new wonder drug
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
anti
▪ Standouts include Douglas's anti-drugs czar whose daughter is a crackhead.
▪ The drugs were recovered Feb. 4 by the cutter Morgenthau during an anti-drug patrol, Clayton said.
▪ The last DeKalb sheriff set up an anti-drug taskforce, to the impotent fury of the county police.
▪ The judgment does not affect Pfizer's patent for sildenafil citrate, the main ingredient of the anti-impotence drug Viagra.
▪ She didn't smoke or drink and was staunchly anti-drugs.
generic
▪ More generic drugs are now used, and stocks are much more carefully controlled.
▪ In New York, one of the big ones is generic drugs.
▪ Campaigners argue that poor countries faced with a health emergency have a right under international trade legislation to buy generic drugs.
▪ The drug maker said Congress decided not to grant generic drug makers the right to market their products during the transition.
▪ Prices of generic drugs have soared by 45 % over the past 15 months.
▪ It was clear that some economies were possible if more generic drugs were prescribed rather than branded drugs.
▪ The drugs in these areas were not at the frontier of medical science and acceptable generic drugs existed.
hard
▪ Dealing in drugs, particularly hard drugs, is not an activity condoned by any of the community organisations on the estate.
▪ No topless dancers, no hard drugs, no trial.
▪ Our reporters uncovered a generation who have been sucked into a dark underworld of solvent abuse and hard drugs.
▪ Tobacco and alcohol are far more harmful than the so-called hard drugs, heroin and cocaine.
▪ I was really hard on drugs.
▪ Is it fair to equate alcohol with hard drugs?
▪ He accepted that legalisation would not necessarily greatly increase addiction to hard drugs such as cocaine and heroin.
▪ The linking of alcohol and hard drugs confuses health education messages.
illegal
▪ It is the criminal activity surrounding the supply of illegal drugs that we should really worry about.
▪ The depositions touch on rumors of illegal drug use, extramarital affairs and petty squabbling.
▪ In August 1988, he was arrested for possessing illegal drug paraphernalia - syringes.
▪ Federal authorities billed the indictment of the drug supplier as a new way to attack illegal drug production.
▪ The court heard the killing followed a row over money from the sale of illegal drugs.
▪ After four hours of banging rave tunes and a whole consignment of illegal drugs, they're in the mood to party.
▪ Similarly, the much greater availability of illegal drugs has led to a phenomenal growth in drug offences.
▪ Cannabis, the most widely used illegal drug in Britain, is not physically addictive either.
illicit
▪ The declared goal of Washington's policy is to staunch the flow of illicit drugs.
▪ As a health officer I am opposed to the use of illicit drugs.
▪ This study primarily related to stress and to the use of alcohol and illicit drugs.
▪ Some will argue that all illicit drugs are too dangerous to legalize.
▪ They had taken away his clothes and his luggage, no doubt to search for illicit drugs.
▪ One-third of eighth-graders report the use of illicit drugs, including inhalants.
▪ One-third of girls and almost two-fifths of boys admitted having used illicit drugs.
▪ Also, watch your intake of alcohol and illicit drugs like marijuana.
intravenous
▪ Case 2 was a male intravenous drug user, 32, and seropositive since 1986.
▪ His execution was to have been the first in California using intravenous drugs.
▪ Today, some research suggests that 50 percent of the city's intravenous drug users have been infected.
▪ Most HIV-positive intravenous drug users are also infected by hepatitis C virus.
▪ Conclusions - Seroconversion to HIV-1 among intravenous drug misusers is associated with bacterial pneumonia.
▪ Most reports describe primary HIV-1 infection among groups other than misusers of intravenous drugs.
▪ Intake of potentially hepatotoxic drugs, intravenous drug addiction and previous blood transfusions were ruled out in all patients.
new
▪ The firm has 20 new drugs in its pipeline.
▪ With a combination of psychotherapy and new psychiatric drugs, between 80 percent and 90 percent of depressed patients get relief.
▪ They apply as much to the testing of new drugs by the pharmaceutical companies as to that of more mundane products. 1.
▪ Medicine has generally regarded the placebo effect as a nuisance: it does make research on new medical drugs very difficult.
▪ Mifepristone is one of a range of new drugs which are anti-hormones.
▪ He turned out to be a bone expert who suggested a new drug for Pauline, 36.
▪ I had been told that the new drug had side-effects.
▪ So basic research and the discovery of new drugs for mental disorder are almost inseparable.
recreational
▪ There have been occasional remarks that some players may have dallied for a time with what are known as recreational drugs.
▪ In fact, caffeine is arguably the safest recreational drug.
▪ The project will look at recreational drug use and examine the implications for agencies working with young people.
▪ And yet, despite its safety and mildness relative to other recreational drugs, caffeine still unquestionably alters brain function.
▪ Also: no caffeine, nicotine, alcohol or recreational drugs.
▪ In many ways, caffeine is in a different league from other recreational drugs.
▪ In the concluding chapter, Jonnes takes issue with those who favor decriminalization or legalization of recreational drugs.
▪ The only other recreational drug used in this way is nicotine, which is also seldom used for outright intoxication.
■ NOUN
abuse
▪ Errol Flynn's drug abuse was only revealed after his death.
▪ The center also will offer referrals for drug abuse counseling if requested.
▪ Over the years of football authorities have become obsessed with rooting out drug abuse in the game.
▪ Alcohol and tobacco accelerate epidemics, such as tuberculosis and drug abuse.
▪ The shock statistics reveal a sharp rise in drug abuse of all kinds among teenagers over the past two years.
▪ The state alcohol and drug abuse agency was put into conservatorship last year after state officials discovered that money had been misspent.
▪ Yates had a history of drug abuse for which she received treatment.
▪ Now he has called on other schools in the town to unite in a crusade against violence and drug abuse.
addict
▪ The Grammy and MusiCares Foundation, which also helps alcoholics and drug addicts, will benefit and the song could raise millions.
▪ Habitual petty thieves and drug addicts dumped on top of their already bulging caseload become their newest clients.
▪ The prison reform group says one problem is a lack of treatment for drug addicts in jail.
▪ The people look furtive, like drug addicts, as they take them out in stacks of four or five.
▪ Unfortunately, much of the opium produced by the plants ends up in the bloodstreams of drug addicts.
▪ Here they began a small home for alcoholics and drug addicts.
▪ What is the welfare of the drug addict, under the influence of the drug?
▪ The four persons who were beaten and burned not only were homeless, but were reported by police to be drug addicts.
addiction
▪ It is often thought that drug addiction is a failure of will-power and is evidence of a weak will or inadequate personality.
▪ Many are afflicted by alcoholism, drug addiction, and depression.
▪ That included his descent into drug addiction and his relationship with his father, the Duke of Marlborough.
▪ Furthermore, because alcohol and other mood-altering chemicals are cross-addictive, we shall probably always have drug addiction as well.
▪ Some one kind, some one whose life -- and thus hers -- is not ruled by the demons of drug addiction and alcoholism.
▪ The results are clear to see: divorce, child and wife abuse, alcoholism and drug addiction.
▪ They cared little for themselves; they were in and out of hospital for drug addiction and overdoses and abortions.
▪ Nor were muggings, attacks on old ladies and children, and drug addiction.
cartel
▪ If Paez is extradited to the United States, he could potentially be a source of important information on the drug cartel.
▪ Meanwhile, the Medellin drug cartel has been largely dismantled and its leader, Pablo Escobar, was killed.
▪ Harvey Weinig Convicted of laundering $ 19m for the Cali drug cartel.
company
▪ And what of the drug companies?
▪ Global marketing; big drugs companies try to ease the pain of more competition by selling products worldwide.
▪ But other drugs companies have new products which they hope will do this.
▪ If it was a drug company, they rely pretty heavily on impressive animal test data to put the product over.
▪ But we can be reasonably sure that the drug company will not guarantee the potency of the sample beyond its sell-by date.
▪ The minister can make a decision that a drug is too expensive and the drug companies have no right to defend themselves.
overdose
▪ Mr Hayward said Roberts had tried to kill himself again in the last day or two with a drugs overdose.
▪ They stamp out graffiti, quash drug deals, bust carjacking rings, rescue drug overdose victims, even prevent suicides.
▪ Finally, the patient himself asked that the doctors kill him: they did so - through a drugs overdose.
▪ One boy died in a mysterious fire, another of a drug overdose.
▪ Soon after that, she ended up in hospital after a drug overdose.
▪ A full inquiry has been launched to find out how Newall, 27, was able to take a drugs overdose.
▪ Since 1980 the number of drug overdose deaths has increased by 540 %.
▪ He was working with the Woody Herman band at the time of his death following a drug overdose.
prescription
▪ And yes, there is a prescription drug for that-Revia, from Du Pont.
▪ The Food and Drug Administration Tuesday announced a program aimed at providing consumers with better information about prescription drugs.
▪ It hopes to sell Tagamet, now a prescription drug, this way.
▪ The autopsy would eventually show that Mom had taken three different prescription drugs.
▪ HMOs are fleeing Arizona's rural counties, leaving seniors with rising prescription drug bills and no coverage.
▪ So do Gore's hopes of securing a universal prescription drug benefit for the elderly.
▪ Most senior citizens also lack coverage for prescription drugs and dental care, which are not covered by Medicare.
▪ Within the pharmaceutical division, prescription drug sales rose 9 percent in local currencies.
problem
▪ Dennis Hopper's life reflects Hollywood's drug problem over the past three decades.
▪ The authorities of New College have also begun investigating the extent of the drugs problem there.
▪ What I did not know at the time was that his drinking problem stemmed from his drug problem.
▪ Low numbers might indicate that there is no drug problem.
▪ About three years ago, I wrote a column about Daryl Strawberry and his ongoing drug problem.
▪ Need help with a drug problem?
▪ There was a flip side to this drug problem as well.
squad
▪ It was last August that drug squad officers raided a barn at Chalford near Stroud.
▪ Melvin Blizzard, a drug squad supervisor.
▪ August 20: Cannabis plants worth £2,500 seized by drugs squad officers at a house in the Waterside area of Londonderry.
▪ On January 1, 1982, Coetzee was transferred too the drugs squad.
▪ Attempts to control drug use, through the formation of drug squads, helped to amplify it.
▪ Detective Sergeant Kenneth Simpson of the Strathclyde police's drugs squad knows the type of man he is looking for.
test
▪ Under the governing body's initiative, some karate competitions now include a random drug test.
▪ Subsequent drug tests revealed the boys had used cocaine, police said.
▪ But he stressed that he told officials about it at the post-match drugs test.
▪ The drug tests have been done so far only in fruit flies.
▪ What they are actually selling is drug tests for employees.
▪ Her disputed drug test was taken in Tempe unlike the Reynolds' test, administered outside the United States.
▪ The second point is that you may be asked to take a drug test at any squad session.
▪ Later the same year, a pair of runners refused to submit to random drug tests.
therapy
▪ Finally, such medical care will generally involve invasive drug therapy.
▪ Thus, it seems most reasonable to PostPone drug therapy of primary hyperuricemia until clinical manifestations occur.
▪ Programmed ventricular stimulation not only helps to guide the selection of antiarrhythmic drug therapy but also provides important prognostic information.
▪ Disseminated histoplasmosis can be treated effectively if the diagnosis is made quickly and anti-fungal drug therapy is started early.
▪ The results of this approach are that some individuals may be committed to lifelong drug therapy which they do not need.
▪ Were he alive today, Tchaikovsky would be a candidate for psychiatric counseling and drug therapy.
▪ Without drug therapy she risks developing liver cancer, which would make a transplant her only hope of survival.
▪ The outlook for pharmacist initiation and modification of drug therapy.
trade
▪ Expansion of the international drug trade, exploiting the inner-urban under-class.
▪ Consider the school principal who discovers students wearing beepers to stay in contact with their superiors in the drug trade.
▪ He's up to his black eyeballs in the drug trade.
▪ Experts disagree about the extent of the expansion of Tupac Amaru and Sendero Luminoso into the drug trade.
▪ In view of this, the drugs trade looks like a Godsend.
▪ Residents fled the downtown, businesses boarded up and gangs and drug trade became commonplace.
▪ Meanwhile Customs and Excise is celebrating what it believes to be a significant blow to the drugs trade.
▪ For their part, neither Carrillo nor Guzman are considered pacifists within the drug trade.
trafficker
▪ This creates an offence of assisting a drug trafficker to retain the benefits of his or her proceeds.
▪ Extradition is a terrifying prospect for drug traffickers, who fear hard time in U.S. prisons.
▪ In 1987 he had led a campaign for the extradition of drug traffickers.
▪ In addition, all charges against self-confessed drug traffickers would in future be heard by the same judge.
trafficking
▪ This new power to presume guilt of unspecified offences was advertised as a unique response to the unique evil of drug trafficking.
▪ The provisions on drug trafficking streamline the confiscation procedure.
▪ Linked to the Mafia he was also behind counterfeit currency scams and drug trafficking.
▪ The Assembly also agreed on closer co-operation on the environment, on regional security and in the fight against drug trafficking.
▪ They will vigorously pursue their policies to combat drug trafficking and misuse of drugs, nationally and internationally.
▪ He also suggested seeking technical and military assistance from abroad to deal with such problems as drug trafficking.
▪ Co-operation on drug trafficking was also discussed.
▪ A number of prisoners detained in connection with alleged drug trafficking had been held without trial since 1991.
treatment
▪ Supervised clinical training is provided in cytotoxic drug treatment and radiation therapy.
▪ The publication also is distributed to youth clubs, clinics, school libraries, drug treatment centers and churches across the country.
▪ Evaluation of the cost effectiveness of drug treatment is in its infancy, and health economics can inform the debate.
▪ Moreover, few patients, if any, have their cholesterol decreased to very low levels with drug treatment.
▪ Tranquilliser Dependence Many local drug treatment centres provide services to meet the particular needs of people dependent on drugs such as tranquillisers.
▪ The duration of such drug treatment is an individual judgment.
▪ They then put the infected cells back into the babies without giving any drug treatment.
▪ A law to give counties funds to develop drug treatment on demand.
use
▪ There is a theory that even if drug testing is flawed, it at least deters drug use.
▪ Wavy Gravy, romancer of a suburban rock culture where drug use almost never results in mandatory sentencing.
▪ But this trendy new board game is littered with connotations of drug use.
▪ Fifteen were later expelled for drug use.
▪ All of their lives are reduced to their drug use.
▪ The incident began early Sunday when San Jose police began chasing the man for resisting arrest and drug use.
▪ Illicit drug use also has to be set against the context of prescribed drug-taking.
▪ From a public health perspective, these are very effective programs that do not encourage drug use.
user
▪ Many of these predisposing factors are observed more often among drug users than among homosexual men.
▪ So too with the cost of mental health care and of rehabilitation programs for drug users and for alcoholics.
▪ The police had rounded up a circle of drug users and suppliers.
▪ Most HIV-positive intravenous drug users are also infected by hepatitis C virus.
▪ The strongly increased incidence among drug users who seroconverted is probably due to the temporary immunological depression associated with seroconversion.
▪ One out of the 18 drug users who seroconverted suffered from oesophageal candidiasis at the time of seroconversion.
▪ Pneumonia was the clinical symptom most strongly associated with seroconversion among drug users.
▪ He says it's vital that drug users have access to supplies of clean syringes.
war
▪ Nor, by the way, will it win the drugs war.
▪ Under the law, the United States suspends all assistance programs to any country not certified as cooperating in the drug war.
▪ So why does the drug war keep growing?
▪ Before he was reincarnated as Mr Virtue, Bennett commanded the drug war in the Bush administration.
▪ The drug war is a skirmish, the leftist gangs an irritant.
▪ The incident has cast light on the creeping privatisation of the drug war.
■ VERB
control
▪ But some of the patients will still have a tremor, even though their stiffness is satisfactorily controlled by the drug.
▪ It can also be relieved or controlled by drugs and in severe cases, surgery.
▪ Stubbornness: Individual willpower, the absolute determination to control drinking or drug use, is exactly what keeps the disease going.
▪ Attempts to control drug use, through the formation of drug squads, helped to amplify it.
deal
▪ You are suspected of dealing in drugs, Lizzy.
▪ It is considered particularly effective in dealing with certain drug abusers.
▪ They are alleged to have dealt in drugs in the Milton Keynes and Aylesbury areas and were involved in car crime.
▪ The younger two kids are still doing fine, the older is in jail for dealing drugs.
▪ Time allowed 08:27 I dealt drugs in jail.
▪ If some one dealt drugs out of the apartment next door, residents could complain-but the system rarely responded.
involve
▪ They say they have only tenuous evidence Gary might have been involved in drugs.
▪ The plane crash involves Dave with drug dealers, killers and federal agents, all of whom threaten his peace and family.
▪ And if so, which organism is involved, and what drug sensitivity do you have?
▪ Now the military, especially the air force, is becoming much more involved in drug interdiction.
▪ Was he involved in the drugs ring Adam was still convinced was operating in the club?
▪ None of our kids have been involved with drugs, but they had lots of suggestions.
▪ The brothers who beat him up are involved in the drugs racket.
▪ No one in his family was involved with drugs and he had never been arrested.
prescribe
▪ The clinic responded with two more alarm clocks before prescribing drugs.
▪ Some rape victims might be lucky enough to encounter an emergency room doctor who will prescribe the drugs.
▪ It follows that careful monitoring of patients for their susceptibility to depression before prescribing mood-altering drugs would be a wise precaution.
▪ Therefore, I initiate disulfiram treatment by prescribing the drug for the patient to self-administer.
▪ But the nursing staff, understandably enough, wanted to check his identity before prescribing the drugs.
▪ They are examined by a physician who works for Nutri / System and will prescribe the diet drugs.
▪ In many cases it is particularly important to discuss the reasons for not prescribing psychotropic drugs.
▪ However, when the doctors prescribe a drug, it is evidently science.
sell
▪ You got ta sell the drugs to make the money.
▪ He would like to see it sold through local drug stores.
▪ They have broken our by laws by selling drugs and drink, camping and using vehicles.
▪ A lot of them are selling drugs or on drugs or in jail.
▪ Danny Gardiner said he sold drugs to Chalky White ... but he had nothing to do with his death.
▪ The Population Council also announced it had set up a new company, Advances for Choice, to sell the drug.
▪ What they are actually selling is drug tests for employees.
take
▪ Some, as you know, seek revenge - they riot, they take drugs and generally make damned nuisances of themselves.
▪ He also emphasizes that men considering taking the drug first discuss it with their partner.
▪ Once you've taken the drug, your next decision could be influenced by that drug.
▪ About 3 1 / 2 hours after taking the drug, Head expelled the embryo, she said.
▪ Both the phosphorylation of receptors and their absence means that it takes more of the drug to obtain the same effect.
▪ Here's what you have to do to get the celluloid treatment. Take lots of drugs.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
banking/drug/health etc czar
▪ Barry R.. McCaffrey, White House drug czar.
▪ Our drug czar watches in impotence as shooting wars between drug gangs erupt in city after city.
▪ Similarly, when Dole asserts that Clinton reduced the office of drug czar by 83 percent, he is on solid ground.
▪ Standouts include Douglas's anti-drugs czar whose daughter is a crackhead.
▪ When drug traffic escalates, they appoint a national drug czar.
drug/alcohol dependence
▪ His father says that David accepts the sentence, and is getting treatment for his drug dependence.
▪ Most people make the change from occasional social drinking to alcohol dependence gradually.
▪ Studies of twins and of alcohol-dependent patients point to an inherited vulnerability to alcohol dependence, too.
▪ The higher figures came for such easy-to-call labels as bulimia and alcohol and drug dependence.
▪ You can get treatment for drug dependence, mostly as an outpatient.
drug/dope/cocaine etc fiend
▪ It was bad to see him that way, angry and shivering a little like a dope fiend.
▪ We pour another glass and vent our spleen on drug barons and dope fiends.
miracle cure/drug
▪ I can call myself lucky because streptomycin, the miracle drug, is newly available.
▪ If so, tax cuts would be the miracle cure.
▪ Last week medical research came up with another miracle drug.
▪ Salesmen sell miracle cures for all kinds of diseases.
▪ The miracle cure is when the patient helped cure himself..
▪ The alternatives have very seldom been tested in any scientific way, and their promises of miracle cures are usually anecdotal.
▪ The fear of chemicals can also delay new miracle drugs from entering the market.
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair but there are some very good treatments around.
performance-enhancing drug/product/supplement etc
▪ Seven of the 12 winners tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs.
run drugs/guns
under the influence (of alcohol/drink/drugs etc)
▪ Cowan suggests that the strength of the excitatory interactions increases relative to that of the inhibitory interactions under the influence of the drug.
▪ Teenagers under the influence of the locally produced khat narcotic plant were said to be responsible for much of the artillery fire.
▪ The motor velocity increases under the influence of the positive torque and the equilibrium position is attained with maximum velocity.
▪ The roads, under the influence of the rain, were becoming shocking.
▪ The weather became cooler under the influences of cold breezes from the frozen north, observed my master.
▪ Today I write this, happily, under the influence of a drug.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a new campaign to warn teens about the danger of drugs
▪ Dewey said that legalizing marijuana would encourage people to experiment with hard drugs such as cocaine or heroin.
▪ Four teenagers were arrested for selling drugs.
▪ Many researchers think that the drug may help prevent prostate cancer.
▪ Morphine is a very powerful drug.
▪ One disadvantage of the drug is that it is very expensive.
▪ Seven out of ten teenagers said they had tried soft drugs.
▪ She has been treated for alcohol and drug abuse.
▪ The drugs I take for hay fever make me feel very drowsy.
▪ The agency's efforts to reduce the flow of illegal drugs into the United States has largely failed.
▪ The article says that Ware tried to commit suicide by combining prescription drugs and alcohol.
▪ The New Jersey drug maker will begin marketing its new anti-balding medication in April.
▪ The organization tries to deal with the widespread problems of drug addiction and alcoholism.
▪ Thompson was arrested for selling drugs in the fall of 1992.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A lot of work will have to be done before human beings start taking drugs in dissolving glass.
▪ Alcohol and drug misusers may fear approaching statutory agencies for help, especially if they are parents.
▪ Back then, because of drugs, I lost everything I had.
▪ Conclusions - Seroconversion to HIV-1 among intravenous drug misusers is associated with bacterial pneumonia.
▪ D.W. had come in over ocean and flown low as a drug smuggler over what might as well be called treetops.
▪ Despite being a rich drug dealer, he never misses a class.
▪ In facing the challenge of drug abuse, the media have never been less monolithic.
▪ One of the early ones was dinitrophenol, the first synthetic drug used for weight reduction.
II.verb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
banking/drug/health etc czar
▪ Barry R.. McCaffrey, White House drug czar.
▪ Our drug czar watches in impotence as shooting wars between drug gangs erupt in city after city.
▪ Similarly, when Dole asserts that Clinton reduced the office of drug czar by 83 percent, he is on solid ground.
▪ Standouts include Douglas's anti-drugs czar whose daughter is a crackhead.
▪ When drug traffic escalates, they appoint a national drug czar.
drug/alcohol dependence
▪ His father says that David accepts the sentence, and is getting treatment for his drug dependence.
▪ Most people make the change from occasional social drinking to alcohol dependence gradually.
▪ Studies of twins and of alcohol-dependent patients point to an inherited vulnerability to alcohol dependence, too.
▪ The higher figures came for such easy-to-call labels as bulimia and alcohol and drug dependence.
▪ You can get treatment for drug dependence, mostly as an outpatient.
drug/dope/cocaine etc fiend
▪ It was bad to see him that way, angry and shivering a little like a dope fiend.
▪ We pour another glass and vent our spleen on drug barons and dope fiends.
drugged/doped up to the eyeballs
miracle cure/drug
▪ I can call myself lucky because streptomycin, the miracle drug, is newly available.
▪ If so, tax cuts would be the miracle cure.
▪ Last week medical research came up with another miracle drug.
▪ Salesmen sell miracle cures for all kinds of diseases.
▪ The miracle cure is when the patient helped cure himself..
▪ The alternatives have very seldom been tested in any scientific way, and their promises of miracle cures are usually anecdotal.
▪ The fear of chemicals can also delay new miracle drugs from entering the market.
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair but there are some very good treatments around.
performance-enhancing drug/product/supplement etc
▪ Seven of the 12 winners tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs.
under the influence (of alcohol/drink/drugs etc)
▪ Cowan suggests that the strength of the excitatory interactions increases relative to that of the inhibitory interactions under the influence of the drug.
▪ Teenagers under the influence of the locally produced khat narcotic plant were said to be responsible for much of the artillery fire.
▪ The motor velocity increases under the influence of the positive torque and the equilibrium position is attained with maximum velocity.
▪ The roads, under the influence of the rain, were becoming shocking.
▪ The weather became cooler under the influences of cold breezes from the frozen north, observed my master.
▪ Today I write this, happily, under the influence of a drug.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Collins says she was drugged and then raped on their first date.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ We can't all be permanently drugged.
Wikipedia

Drug (disambiguation)

A drug is any chemical substance other than a food or device that affects the function of living things. Drugs can be used to treat illness, relieve a symptom or modify a chemical process in the body for a specific purpose.

Drug(s) or D.R.U.G.S. may also refer to:

  • Drug, in some English dialects, a non-standard verb past form for "dragged"
  • Drug, also drugg or droge, a floating device roped to a harpoon used in ancient whaling to exhaust the whale
  • Drug (grape), another name for the wine grape Mourvèdre
    • Graciano, another wine grape with Drug as a synonym
  • Drug (India), a variant spelling for Durg or Durg district
  • Drug, a name for a demon in ancient Vedic Hinduism, from the Vedic Sanskrit root druh ("to be hostile")
  • Drug/druh (друг), the word for "friend" in Slavic languages, prominently used (as a Nadsat jargon) in A Clockwork Orange
  • Drûg, a term for a member of the Drúedain, a Middle-earth race in the fiction of J. R. R. Tolkien
  • Drugs (journal), a peer-reviewed medical journal
  • Drug Island, an island in Alaska, U.S.
  • DRUGS, a funk musical group founded by Michael "Clip" Payne
  • D.R.U.G.S. (production team), Directing Reality Undermining Governed Systems
  • D.R.U.G.S. (Death and Reincarnation Under God's Supervision), 2012 mixtape by Flatbush Zombies
  • Destroy Rebuild Until God Shows, an American post-hardcore band previously known as D.R.U.G.S.
    • D.R.U.G.S., 2011 album by Destroy Rebuild Until God Shows
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2000 song by Phife Dawg from Ventilation: Da LP
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2000 song by Fiend from Can I Burn?
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2009 song by Dead and Divine from The Machines We Are
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2009 song by The Raveonettes from In and Out of Control
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2011 song by Iggy Azalea
  • "D.R.U.G.S.", 2014 song by SD from Truly Blessed

Drug

A drug is any substance other than food, that when inhaled, injected, smoked, consumed, absorbed via a patch on the skin or dissolved under the tongue causes a physiological change in the body.

In pharmacology, a pharmaceutical drug, also called a medication or medicine, is a chemical substance used to treat, cure, prevent, or diagnose a disease or to promote well-being. Traditionally drugs were obtained through extraction from medicinal plants, but more recently also by organic synthesis. Pharmaceutical drugs may be used for a limited duration, or on a regular basis for chronic disorders.

Pharmaceutical drugs are often classified into drug classes—groups of related drugs that have similar chemical structures, the same mechanism of action (binding to the same biological target), a related mode of action, and that are used to treat the same disease. The Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System (ATC), the most widely used drug classification system, assigns drugs a unique ATC code, which is an alphanumeric code that assigns it to specific drug classes within the ATC system. Another major classification system is the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. This classifies drugs according to their solubility and permeability or absorption properties.

Psychoactive drugs are chemical substances that affect the function of the central nervous system, altering perception, mood or consciousness. They include alcohol, a depressant, and the stimulants nicotine and caffeine. These three are the most widely consumed psychoactive drugs worldwide and are also considered as recreational drugs since they are used for pleasure rather than medicinal purposes. Other recreational drugs include hallucinogens, opiates and amphetamines and some of these are also used in spiritual or religious settings. Some drugs can cause addiction and all drugs can have side effects. Excessive use of stimulants can promote stimulant psychosis. Many recreational drugs are illicit and international treaties such as the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs exist for the purpose of their prohibition.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Drug

Drug \Drug\ (dr[u^]g), v. i. [See 1st Drudge.] To drudge; to toil laboriously. [Obs.] ``To drugge and draw.''
--Chaucer.

Drug

Drug \Drug\, n. A drudge (?).
--Shak. (Timon iv. 3, 253).

Drug

Drug \Drug\, n. [F. drogue, prob. fr. D. droog; akin to E. dry; thus orig., dry substance, hers, plants, or wares. See Dry.]

  1. Any animal, vegetable, or mineral substance used in the composition of medicines.

    Whence merchants bring Their spicy drugs.
    --Milton.

  2. Any commodity that lies on hand, or is not salable; an article of slow sale, or in no demand; -- used often in the phrase ``a drug on the market''. ``But sermons are mere drugs.''
    --Fielding.

    And virtue shall a drug become.
    --Dryden.

  3. any stuff used in dyeing or in chemical operations.

  4. any substance intended for use in the treatment, prevention, diagnosis, or cure of disease, especially one listed in the official pharmacopoeia published by a national authority.

  5. any substance having psychological effects, such as a narcotic, stimulant, or hallucinogenic agent, especially habit-forming and addictive substances, sold or used illegally; as, a drug habit; a drug treatment program; a teenager into drugs; a drug bust; addicted to drugs; high on drugs.

    Syn: illegal drug. [PJC]

    They [smaller and poorer nations] have lined up to recount how drug trafficking and consumption have corrupted their struggling economies and societies and why they are hard pressed to stop it. -- Christopher S. Wren (N Y. Times, June 10, 1998, p. A5)

Drug

Drug \Drug\, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Drugged; p. pr. & vb. n. Drugging.] [Cf. F. droguer.] To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines.
--B. Jonson.

Drug

Drug \Drug\, v. t.

  1. To affect or season with drugs or ingredients; esp., to stupefy by a narcotic drug. Also Fig.

    The laboring masses . . . [were] drugged into brutish good humor by a vast system of public spectacles.
    --C. Kingsley.

    Drug thy memories, lest thou learn it.
    --Tennyson.

  2. To tincture with something offensive or injurious.

    Drugged as oft, With hatefullest disrelish writhed their jaws.
    --Milton.

  3. To dose to excess with, or as with, drugs.

    With pleasure drugged, he almost longed for woe.
    --Byron.

Wiktionary

drug

Etymology 1 n. 1 (context pharmacology English) A substance used to treat an illness, relieve a symptom, or modify a chemical process in the body for a specific purpose. 2 A psychoactive substance, especially one which is illegal and addictive, ingested for recreational use, such as cocaine. 3 Anything, such as a substance, emotion(,) or action, to which one is addicted. 4 Any commodity that lies on hand, or is not salable; an article of slow sale, or in no demand. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To administer intoxicating drugs to, generally without the recipient's knowledge or consent. 2 (context transitive English) To add intoxicating drugs to with the intention of drugging someone. 3 (context intransitive English) To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines. Etymology 2

vb. (en-past of: drag) Etymology 3

n. (context obsolete English) A drudge.

WordNet

drug

  1. n. a substance that is used as a medicine or narcotic

  2. [also: drugging, drugged]

drug

  1. v. administer a drug to; "They drugged the kidnapped tourist" [syn: dose]

  2. use recreational drugs [syn: do drugs]

  3. [also: drugging, drugged]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

drug

late 14c. (early 14c. in Anglo-French), "medicine, chemical ingredients," from Old French droge "supply, stock, provision" (14c.), which is of unknown origin, perhaps from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German droge-vate "dry barrels," or droge waere, literally "dry wares," but specifically drugs and spices, with first element mistaken as word for the contents (see dry goods), or because medicines mostly consisted of dried herbs.\n

\nCompare Latin species, in Late Latin "wares," then specialized to "spices" (French épice, English spice). The same source produced Italian and Spanish droga, Swedish drog.\n

\nApplication to "narcotics and opiates" is late 19c., though association with "poisons" is 1500s. Druggie first recorded 1968. To be a drug on or in the market (mid-17c.) is of doubtful connection and may be a different word, perhaps a play on drag, which was sometimes drug c.1240-1800.

drug

c.1600, from drug (n.). Related: drugged; drugging.

Usage examples of "drug".

They all shuffle, all these strange lonely children of God, these mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, husbands and wives whose noisy aberrations are safely muffled now by drugs.

Another showed a young woman apparently drugged, and then gagged with masking tape, before being abused by two men.

The fact that these drug abusers were in jail proved, once and for all, that drugs drove people to crime.

Someone who has never been addicted to heroin would be horrified to watch an addict self-inject with the drug.

Being addicted to a drug is like spending your whole life attempting to ski uphill.

The cigarette tastes good and it burns my throat and my lungs and though it is the lowest and weakest drug that I am addicted to, it is still a drug and it feels fucking good.

I am not addicted to coffee, it is still a drug and it feels fucking good.

Smoking, like all drug addiction, is a tug-of-war of fear: the fear of what the drug is doing to us, and the fear of not being able to enjoy or cope with life without it.

Get it clearly into your mind: one ingenuity of the nicotine trap is that, like all drug addiction, it is designed to keep you hooked, and that the more it adversely affects your health and purse, the more securely you appear to be hooked.

Can you think of any pastime, other than drug addiction, that works in this way?

Like all other forms of drug addiction, the tendency is to have to light up more often, which merely perpetuates the process.

Like all drug addiction the lower it drags you down, the greater your need for what you believe to be your crutch and friend.

It is only now, some eighteen years later, that increasing numbers of experts are beginning to realize that it is the psychological state of the individual addict that counts and not the substance itself My accumulated knowledge of drug addiction comes from eighteen years of dealing with and answering effectively the questions and worries of the addicted.

What a terrible trap drug addiction is: part of your brain wants you to smoke more, and whenever you do the other part wants you to smoke less.

I could obliterate smoking and all drug addiction with just one billionth of those funds.