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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

cure

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cure for a disease
▪ There is no known cure for this disease.
a miracle cure (=something that solves a problem very effectively)
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair.
cure a disease
▪ The plant was believed to cure diseases in humans and cattle.
prevention is better than cure (=it is better to stop something bad from happening than to remove the problem once it has happened)
▪ You know what they say, prevention is better than cure.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
effective
▪ Probably the only effective cure for green water is a U/V filter.
▪ Both are equally effective and achieve cures about 80 percent of the time.
good
▪ Stallions have an especially low tolerance for boredom, and the best cure is greater variety in work.
▪ So the best cure might lie in shortening the period when that is possible.
▪ You can use the Alexander Technique as a preventative measure: after all, prevention is better than cure.
▪ That's the best cure for people who write anonymous letters.
▪ But keeping busy really is the best cure.
▪ Prevention is better than cure, and you should use a lot of deep stances during your basic training.
▪ The best cure, for both women and men, would be better education and more jobs for the not-very-bright.
▪ I have known it to be successfully treated with black sulphur powder mixed with water but prevention is better than cure.
only
▪ The only cure would have been to leave.
▪ Probably the only effective cure for green water is a U/V filter.
▪ Because if your dry ends turn to split ends, the only cure is no ends.
▪ If an adenocarcinoma in Barrett's oesophagus is diagnosed, resection offers the only chance for cure.
▪ An operation is often the only cure for this painful condition.
▪ For two years Kelly's been waiting for a heart and lung transplant, the only cure for her condition.
▪ The only cure, however, is to remove lead from the water system altogether, by replacing old pipes and tanks.
▪ The only easy cure is make the winding-on in alternate directions, say ten turns each way.
■ NOUN
miracle
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair but there are some very good treatments around.
▪ The miracle cure is when the patient helped cure himself..
▪ Salesmen sell miracle cures for all kinds of diseases.
▪ The alternatives have very seldom been tested in any scientific way, and their promises of miracle cures are usually anecdotal.
▪ Yet levitation and miracle cures were not unknown.
▪ And miracle cures had become almost religious lore.
▪ If so, tax cuts would be the miracle cure.
■ VERB
discover
▪ I think, however, I may have discovered a cure.
▪ None of the doctors in Oaxaca could discover any cure for her illness.
▪ Intent on discovering a cure for a certain strain of influenza, Robert Shannon faces tremendous difficulties, both personal and professional.
effect
▪ In order to effect a lasting cure, it is necessary to correct the fundamental imbalance or disharmony.
▪ He said all her friends had advised it; they had cited many cases where it had effected a cure.
find
▪ If I was a scientist it would be like finding a cure for for a disease or a technological breakthrough.
▪ Clearly, more and better research will be required if science hopes to find a cure for diet-related stupidity in our lifetime.
▪ Her specialist consulted experts worldwide without finding a cure.
▪ Thanks to it as well, very little money was being spent to fight the disease or find a cure.
▪ Will we be the people who will have the task and experience of finding this cure?
▪ And it was around for centuries before people managed to find a cure for it.
▪ It is only when we begin to face an illness that we can find a cure.
▪ Hopefully, some one, somewhere will find a permanent cure from this debilitating malaise, known only as Red Spot Mania.
kill
▪ But the robot can kill as well as cure.
▪ It has been said, with some truth, that more fish are killed by cures than diseases.
offer
▪ Can you tell me what's causing this, and more importantly, offer any cure?
provide
▪ It was built in the early nineteenth century to provide cures for numerous illnesses.
▪ However, don't assume that this will provide a complete cure for the problem, it will merely reduce it.
▪ Similarly, at the Aesculapian sanctuary near Epidaurus, dormitories were provided for pilgrims seeking cures.
seek
▪ Here, the sick would come to worship and seek for cures.
▪ Similarly, at the Aesculapian sanctuary near Epidaurus, dormitories were provided for pilgrims seeking cures.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an ounce of prevention (is worth a pound of cure)
kill or cure
▪ The spring Budget, therefore, will be kill or cure.
miracle cure/drug
▪ I can call myself lucky because streptomycin, the miracle drug, is newly available.
▪ If so, tax cuts would be the miracle cure.
▪ Last week medical research came up with another miracle drug.
▪ Salesmen sell miracle cures for all kinds of diseases.
▪ The miracle cure is when the patient helped cure himself..
▪ The alternatives have very seldom been tested in any scientific way, and their promises of miracle cures are usually anecdotal.
▪ The fear of chemicals can also delay new miracle drugs from entering the market.
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair but there are some very good treatments around.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Adding a little oil into the mechanism is one of the best cures for a noisy engine.
▪ As yet there's no known cure for the disease.
▪ Different management practices might be the cure for the company's problems.
▪ I can give you some tablets that will ease the symptoms, but they're not a cure.
▪ It's not a miracle cure, but moisturiser can make your skin less dry.
▪ Miraculous cures have been reported in Lourdes.
▪ Prevention is far better than any cure.
▪ The experts believe they know the causes of the crime wave but they cannot agree on a cure.
▪ What's the best cure for a hangover?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Athelstan studied the jars, dismissing them as nothing but mild cures for ague, aches and pains.
▪ Hope that a cure will be found for the disease is what keeps his wife going, DelVecchio said.
▪ Some of his cures were certified by the newly formed Royal Society of Medicine.
▪ The cure for the shaking floor is to rebuild the floor, an intimidating task at best.
▪ The simple cure is to fit a damper.
▪ The sooner they find a cure, the better.
▪ This is the perfect marriage: a disease and a cure, both geographically specific.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
disease
▪ And his recovery will prove to all sufferers that the disease can be cured.
▪ The disease can be cured easily with Tetracycline ointment, which costs about $ 1.80 per patient.
drug
▪ Adults and children suffer from strange, debilitating headaches that no drugs will cure.
▪ She had told him that she knew a magic drug to cure any ailment.
▪ The team invents a wonder drug to cure depression.
ill
▪ Like Euripides she believed the sea could cure the ills of man.
▪ I believe my violence will cure their ills!
medicine
▪ We have spent some passionate evenings together changing traveller's cheques and looking for medicine to cure stomach disorders.
▪ A lengthy course of the right medicine can cure the disease.
▪ Something, Mrs Rubinstein, that medicine can not cure.
problem
▪ Payton has copied Stuart Ripley's pre-match warm-up routine to help cure a hamstring problem.
▪ Spaying and neutering pets is the easiest way to cure that problem.
▪ Once you have cured the water pollution problem, you will have to take steps to avoid it happening again.
▪ In the back of the King Street pharmacy he worked on new concoctions, cures for minor dermatological problems.
▪ On their own, owls can not cure the rat problem, but they can help with control.
▪ The machine costs £170 but is guaranteed to cure 100 problems.
▪ To cure the problem, try one of the following ideas.
▪ Nine operations between them had failed to cure the problem and they managed only by almost daily use of laxatives and enemas.
way
▪ Had he gone into the wood to find a way to cure the blemish?
▪ Spaying and neutering pets is the easiest way to cure that problem.
▪ He felt the best way to cure her was to keep giving her her head.
▪ There was no easy way to cure this.
■ VERB
believe
▪ Like Euripides she believed the sea could cure the ills of man.
▪ Its water is believed to cure children of disease.
▪ I believe my violence will cure their ills!
▪ Some force deep within truly wants to believe aliens cured that Montana farmer of his pesky hernia problem.
▪ For this reason, it was called the Golden Bough and was believed to cure diseases in humans and cattle.
▪ They are believed to cure indigestion.
try
▪ Or you might try brandy - it cures most fits.
▪ On a Saturday afternoon, Corporal Tambini tried to cure him of this structural malformation.
▪ Don't try to cure the flakiness yourself with an anti- dandruff shampoo - it requires a different treatment.
▪ The prime minister is taking the blame for the pain of trying to cure the economy.
▪ I took sleeping pills for the first month and then tried hypnotherapy to cure it.
▪ Now, as I tried to cure my asthma, I gave up smoking altogether.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
an ounce of prevention (is worth a pound of cure)
miracle cure/drug
▪ I can call myself lucky because streptomycin, the miracle drug, is newly available.
▪ If so, tax cuts would be the miracle cure.
▪ Last week medical research came up with another miracle drug.
▪ Salesmen sell miracle cures for all kinds of diseases.
▪ The miracle cure is when the patient helped cure himself..
▪ The alternatives have very seldom been tested in any scientific way, and their promises of miracle cures are usually anecdotal.
▪ The fear of chemicals can also delay new miracle drugs from entering the market.
▪ Unfortunately, there is no miracle cure for thinning hair but there are some very good treatments around.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Beveridge believed that unemployment could be cured by state intervention.
▪ Doctors won't consider her cured until she has been free of cancer for several years.
▪ Eventually we found a doctor who was able to cure her of her depression.
▪ If your computer stops working, re-booting might cure the problem.
▪ It is possible that in the near future we will be able to cure AIDS.
▪ Many cancer victims can be cured if the disease is detected early enough.
▪ Most economic ills cannot be cured by a simple infusion of cash.
▪ Penicillin or other antibiotics will cure most infections.
▪ Prostate cancer can be cured if it is caught early.
▪ The only thing that can cure grief is time.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But it solved the problem of Thérèse's tantrums at night, it cured them in no time.
▪ His patronage came about when people suffering from rabies were cured at his grave.
▪ Make a kind of grand tour on my own, take the waters and cure what ails me.
▪ Oh, how he would have loved to cure her of her loneliness.
▪ There is always some magic remedy that will cure it, or some whizz-kid quack with a patent method.
▪ This cured it and I had the carbs tuned to perfection.
▪ This alternative to the matrixing arrangement is exactly what I used in curing a large, troubled government procurement organization.
Wikipedia

Cure (disambiguation)

A cure is a completely effective treatment for a disease.

Cure, or similar, may also refer to:

Cure (film)

is a 1997 Japanese crime- horror film directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa, starring Koji Yakusho, Masato Hagiwara, Tsuyoshi Ujiki and Anna Nakagawa.

Cure (river)

The Cure is a 112 km long river in central France, a right tributary of the Yonne. Its source is in Gien-sur-Cure, in the Morvan hills. Its course crosses the following départements and towns:

  • Nièvre: Montsauche-les-Settons
  • Yonne: Vézelay, Vermenton

The Cure flows into the Yonne in Cravant near Vermenton.

Cure (surname)

Cure is a surname, and may refer to:

  • Alfred Capel-Cure (1826–1896), British Army officer and photography pioneer
  • Amy Cure (born 1992), Australian track cyclist
  • Carlos Cure (born 1944), Colombian diplomat
  • Cornelius Cure (died 1607), English sculptor
  • Henry de Cure (born 1993), Australian wheelchair tennis player
  • Nigel Capel-Cure (1908–2004), English cricketer

CURE (magazine)

CURE (Cancer Updates, Research, and Education) is a free magazine for cancer patients, survivors, and health care professionals in the oncology field. The publication is the largest consumer magazine in the United States focused entirely on cancer with a circulation of 385,000. The magazine's topics range from cancer research, psychosocial and emotional issues, and practical issues that span from diagnosis to survivorship.

The magazine was founded in 2002 by oncologist Vinay Jain, MD, the magazine's first editor-in-chief. In 2007, Debasish (Debu) Tripathy, MD, became editor-in-chief. Tripathy also serves as the chair of breast oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

The magazine is the flagship product of CURE Media Group, which produces other cancer-related products. Formerly owned by Medical Media Holdings, CURE Media Group was acquired in February 2010 by US Oncology, and in January 2011 by McKesson Corp. In 2014, McKesson Corp. sold CURE Media Group to Michael J. Hennessy Associates, based in Plainsboro, New Jersey.

CURE hosts the annual Extraordinary Healer Award for Oncology Nursing that is presented to one nurse who exemplifies certain qualities during the care of a cancer patient. The award is presented at the annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress.

Cure

A cure is the end of a medical condition; the substance or procedure that ends the medical condition, such as a medication, a surgical operation, a change in lifestyle, or even a philosophical mindset that helps end a person's sufferings. It may also refer to the state of being healed, or cured.

A remission is a temporary end to the medical signs and symptoms of an incurable disease. A disease is said to be incurable if there is always a chance of the patient relapsing, no matter how long the patient has been in remission. An incurable disease may or may not be a terminal illness; conversely, a curable illness can still result in the patient's death.

The proportion of people with a disease that are cured by a given treatment, called the cure fraction or cure rate, is determined by comparing disease-free survival of treated people against a matched control group that never had the disease.

Another way of determining the cure fraction and/or "cure time" is by measuring when the hazard rate in a diseased group of individuals returns to the hazard rate measured in the general population.

Inherent in the idea of a cure is the permanent end to the specific instance of the disease. When a person has the common cold, and then recovers from it, the person is said to be cured, even though the person might someday catch another cold. Conversely, a person that has successfully managed a disease, such as diabetes mellitus, so that it produces no undesirable symptoms for the moment, but without actually permanently ending it, is not cured.

Related concepts, whose meaning can differ, include response, remission and recovery.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

Cure

Cure \Cure\, v. i.

  1. To pay heed; to care; to give attention. [Obs.]

  2. To restore health; to effect a cure.

    Whose smile and frown, like to Achilles' spear, Is able with the change to kill and cure.
    --Shak.

  3. To become healed.

    One desperate grief cures with another's languish.
    --Shak. [1913 Webster] ||

Cure

Cure \Cure\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cured (k[=u]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. Curing.] [OF. curer to take care, to heal, F., only, to cleanse, L. curare to take care, to heal, fr. cura. See Cure,.]

  1. To heal; to restore to health, soundness, or sanity; to make well; -- said of a patient.

    The child was cured from that very hour.
    --Matt. xvii. 18.

  2. To subdue or remove by remedial means; to remedy; to remove; to heal; -- said of a malady.

    To cure this deadly grief.
    --Shak.

    Then he called his twelve disciples together, and gave them power . . . to cure diseases.
    --Luke ix. 1.

  3. To set free from (something injurious or blameworthy), as from a bad habit.

    I never knew any man cured of inattention.
    --Swift.

  4. To prepare for preservation or permanent keeping; to preserve, as by drying, salting, etc.; as, to cure beef or fish; to cure hay.

Cure

Cure \Cure\ (k[=u]r), n. [OF, cure care, F., also, cure, healing, cure of souls, L. cura care, medical attendance, cure; perh. akin to cavere to pay heed, E. cution. Cure is not related to care.]

  1. Care, heed, or attention. [Obs.]

    Of study took he most cure and most heed.
    --Chaucer.

    Vicarages of greatcure, but small value.
    --Fuller.

  2. Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate; hence, that which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate; a curacy; as, to resign a cure; to obtain a cure.

    The appropriator was the incumbent parson, and had the cure of the souls of the parishioners.
    --Spelman.

  3. Medical or hygienic care; remedial treatment of disease; a method of medical treatment; as, to use the water cure.

  4. Act of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health from disease, or to soundness after injury.

    Past hope! pastcure! past help.
    --Shak.

    I do cures to-day and to-morrow.
    --Luke xii. 32.

  5. Means of the removal of disease or evil; that which heals; a remedy; a restorative.

    Cold, hunger, prisons, ills without a cure.
    --Dryden.

    The proper cure of such prejudices.
    --Bp. Hurd.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

cure

c.1300, "care, heed," from Latin cura "care, concern, trouble," with many figurative extensions, such as "study; administration; a mistress," and also "means of healing, remedy," from Old Latin coira-, from PIE root *kois- "be concerned." Meaning "medical care" is late 14c.

cure

parish priest, from French curé (13c.), from Medieval Latin curatus (see curate).

cure

late 14c., from Old French curer, from Latin curare "take care of," hence, in medical language, "treat medically, cure" (see cure (n.)). In reference to fish, pork, etc., first recorded 1743. Related: Cured; curing.\n

\nMost words for "cure, heal" in European languages originally applied to the person being treated but now can be used with reference to the disease, too. Relatively few show an ancient connection to words for "physician;" typically they are connected instead to words for "make whole" or "tend to" or even "conjurer." French guérir (with Italian guarir, Old Spanish guarir) is from a Germanic verb stem also found in in Gothic warjan, Old English wearian "ward off, prevent, defend" (see warrant (n.)).

WordNet

cure

  1. v. provide a cure for, make healthy again; "The treatment cured the boy's acne"; "The quack pretended to heal patients but never managed to" [syn: bring around, heal]

  2. prepare by drying, salting, or chemical processing in order to preserve; "cure meats"; "cure pickles"

  3. make (substances) hard and improve their usability; "cure resin"

  4. be or become preserved; "the apricots cure in the sun"

cure

n. a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain [syn: remedy, curative]

Wiktionary

cure

n. A method, device or medication that restores good health. vb. 1 (context transitive English) To restore to health. 2 (context transitive English) To bring (a disease or its bad effects) to an end.

Usage examples of "cure".

Rykor found it aberrational that the Emperor could believe that poverty could be cured by putting the poor in uniforms.

On examination, we found a very varicose or enlarged condition of the left spermatic veins, and gave it as our opinion that the seminal loss was wholly due to this abnormal condition and could only be cured by an operation that would remove the varicocele.

I respond by pointing out that one of those babies that was aborted thirty years ago might have grown up to be a brilliant scientist and could have discovered the cure for AIDS.

Rummel, a well-known writer of the same school, speaks of curing a case of jaundice in thirty-four days by Homoeopathic doses of pulsatilla, aconite, and cinchona.

She thought too of the acupressure session last nightcoming to him with her secret, with her desperate hope of being cured.

Quixote, however, who, as we have said, felt cured and healthy, wanted to leave immediately to seek adventures, it being his opinion that the time he spent in that place meant he was depriving the world, and all those in it who were in need, of his help and assistance, especially now when he had so much trust and confidence in the balm.

POSITIVE INJURY instead of benefit often results from the employment of some of the nostrums advertised for the cure of spermatorrhea, impotency and kindred affections.

Various worse than useless devices are advertised by quacks, who, as a class, are afraid to undertake surgical treatment for the cure of varicocele.

He said they were in fact genuine medicines--such compounds as every good physician would prescribe for the diseases which they were advertised to cure.

A step through that particular door will put them in a world where any illness is instantly cured and ageing reversed.

Having specialists who devote their entire time and attention to the study of these diseases, we are able to relieve and cure a large number painlessly and speedily, in which the awkward manipulations of physicians or surgeons, whose hands, untrained by constant and skillful use, not only fail to effect any benefit, but set up new, or aggravate existing, disease.

At the above stated period I had also been a sufferer from diarrhea, in its most aggravating form, for three and a half years, and I was completely and radically cured of that, also.

I had also been a sufferer from diarrhea, in its most aggravating form, for three and a half years, and I was completely and radically cured of that, also.

Within a few years we hope to find cures for your light sensitivity, and the agoraphobia that plagues others of our kind.

From observing its action in the cure of this and other miasmatic diseases, and knowing its composition, we are thoroughly satisfied that it contains chemical properties which neutralize and destroy the miasmatic or ague poison which is in the system, and, at the same time, produces a rapid excretion of the neutralized poisons.