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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Wherry

Wherry \Wher"ry\, n.; pl. Wherries. [Cf. Icel. hverfr shifty, crank, hverfa to turn, E. whirl, wharf.] (Naut.)

  1. A passenger barge or lighter plying on rivers; also, a kind of light, half-decked vessel used in fishing. [Eng.]

  2. A long, narrow, light boat, sharp at both ends, for fast rowing or sailing; esp., a racing boat rowed by one person with sculls.

Wherry

Wherry \Wher"ry\, n. [Cf. W. chwerw bitter.] A liquor made from the pulp of crab apples after the verjuice is expressed; -- sometimes called crab wherry. [Prov. Eng.]
--Halliwell.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
wherry

"light, shallow rowboat," mid-15c., of unknown origin.

Wiktionary
wherry

n. 1 A light embarcation used to navigate inland waterways. 2 A flat-bottomed vessel previously employed by British merchants, notably in East Anglia, sometimes converted into pleasure boats. 3 A liquor made from the pulp of crab apples after the verjuice is extracted.

WordNet
wherry
  1. n. sailing barge used especially in East Anglia [syn: Norfolk wherry]

  2. light rowboat for use in racing or for transporting goods and passengers in inland waters and harbors

Wikipedia
Wherry

A wherry is a type of boat that was traditionally

used for carrying cargo or passengers on  rivers and  canals in  England, and is particularly associated with the  River Thames and also with the  Broadland rivers of  Norfolk and  Suffolk.

Usage examples of "wherry".

Sheriff Wherry informed me that the only move attempted on the part of the shorthorn drovers was the arrest of Sponsilier and myself, on the charge of being accomplices in the shooting of one of their men on the North Platte.

Clouds scudding fast beyond the crowded steeples outpaced the fast river traffic, the eelboats and wherries and other light craft bobbing with bellied sails and the towering merchantmen.

Compared with what Salter Wherry was planning for the arcologies, it was nothing.

I abandoned the row-boat, and, after paying the master of the caicco generously, I got into the wherry, made a bargain with the skipper who unfurled three sails, and in less than two hours we were fifteen miles away from Corfu.

Very few of the quarantine guards returned to town, and with the exception of Sheriff Wherry, none of the leading cowmen, all having ridden direct for their ranches.

Sheriff Wherry, anxious to prevent a conflict, counciled with the opposition drovers, resulting in their outfits leaving town, while the principals took stage across to Buford.

So close those wherries hung about that the garlanded rowers who sat at the oars could scarcely pull, but, here as everywhere, it was the same good temper, the same carelessness of order, as like a flowery island in the dancing blue water the motley fleet came up.

The tenors take up the narration, with increasing intensity, the basses and baritones emphasizing the plight of the land, herdbeasts left untended, wherries breaking into crops as holders, crafters, dragonfolk alike are consumed by the dread fever.

They were, says Mr Stephen, and the end was that the men of the island seeing no help was toward, as the ungrate women were all of one mind, made a wherry raft, loaded themselves and their bundles of chattels on shipboard, set all masts erect, manned the yards, sprang their luff, heaved to, spread three sheets in the wind, put her head between wind and water, weighed anchor, ported her helm, ran up the jolly Roger, gave three times three, let the bullgine run, pushed off in their bumboat and put to sea to recover the main of America.

Gibbs works for Wherry, and you met with him for many hours this afternoon—don't think your long cloistering passed unnoticed, Judith—I wonder why you ask me these things.

It was one thing just to take a lift on a friendly wherry as far as Acle, or even as far as Stokesby, but here they were sailing on farther and farther from home with every minute and not knowing what was before them.

He saw Aunt Temma, too, but he had to turn away from the sight of the hideous raw marks, like something cut by the claws of the biggest wherry ever, on Readis’s back, Aunt Bedda was rocking back and forth, and Jayge could not bear to find out if his baby cousin was injured or dead.

Wansor's dancing like a sun-crazed wherry to get his hands on the distance-viewer, all the time wailing that he needn't've dismantled the first apparatus.

We did return with early cress and wild onion, and Gaby surprised himself by bringing down a wild wherry with a wellthrown lance.

We did return with early cress and wild onion, and Gaby surprised himself by bringing down a wild wherry with a well thrown lance.