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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
warranty
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
express
▪ The contract will generally contain an express warranty intended to be in substitution for a condition which would otherwise be imposed.
implied
▪ The purchaser should not accept any argument that implied warranties are adequate.
▪ One particular point should also be made here about the implied warranty of fitness for purpose.
▪ There is in fact no implied covenant or warranty on the part of the landlord in this regard.
▪ There are, however, implied warranties of quiet possession, etc.
■ VERB
give
▪ At the very least the Purchaser will expect the Vendor to give this warranty so far as it is aware.
▪ The Vendor should not be required to give representations, as opposed to warranties.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Almost all the equipment on offer will be second hand, but warranties are offered on most products.
▪ Car retailers sell vehicles with various kinds of warranties concerning replacement of faulty parts at the suppliers expense.
▪ Culver noted that water heaters come with two types of warranties, five years and 10 years.
▪ Manufacturers may be prepared to offer product support in the form of a warranty or repair or replacement service.
▪ The contract will generally contain an express warranty intended to be in substitution for a condition which would otherwise be imposed.
▪ The product has a 10-year warranty against wear, fading or staining.
▪ The stores return the systems to the manufacturers, who check out the machines and renew their warranties before they are auctioned.
▪ There's your warranty of a way out.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Warranty

Warranty \War"rant*y\, v. t. To warrant; to guarantee.

Warranty

Warranty \War"rant*y\, n.; pl. Warranties. [OF. warantie, F. garantie. See Warrant, n., and cf. Guaranty.]

  1. (Anc. Law) A covenant real, whereby the grantor of an estate of freehold and his heirs were bound to warrant and defend the title, and, in case of eviction by title paramount, to yield other lands of equal value in recompense. This warranty has long singe become obsolete, and its place supplied by personal covenants for title. Among these is the covenant of warranty, which runs with the land, and is in the nature of a real covenant.
    --Kent.

  2. (Modern Law) An engagement or undertaking, express or implied, that a certain fact regarding the subject of a contract is, or shall be, as it is expressly or impliedly declared or promised to be. In sales of goods by persons in possession, there is an implied warranty of title, but, as to the quality of goods, the rule of every sale is, Caveat emptor.
    --Chitty. Bouvier.

  3. (Insurance Law) A stipulation or engagement by a party insured, that certain things, relating to the subject of insurance, or affecting the risk, exist, or shall exist, or have been done, or shall be done. These warranties, when express, should appear in the policy; but there are certain implied warranties.
    --Bouvier.

  4. Justificatory mandate or precept; authority; warrant. [R.]
    --Shak.

    If they disobey precept, that is no excuse to us, nor gives us any warranty . . . to disobey likewise.
    --Kettlewe??.

  5. Security; warrant; guaranty.

    The stamp was a warranty of the public.
    --Locke.

    Syn: See Guarantee.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
warranty

mid-14c., legal term for various types of clauses in real estate transactions, from Anglo-French and Old North French warantie "protection, defense, safeguard" (Old French garantie), from warant (see warrant (n.)).

Wiktionary
warranty

n. 1 Security; warrant; guarantee. 2 (context obsolete legal English) A covenant real, whereby the granter of an estate of freehold and his heirs were bound to warrant and defend the title, and, in case of eviction by title paramount, to yield other lands of equal value in recompense. This warranty has long since become obsolete, and its place supplied by personal covenants for title. Among these is the covenant of warranty, which runs with the land, and is in the nature of a real covenant. 3 (context legal English) An engagement or undertaking, expressed or implied, that a certain fact regarding the subject of a contract is, or shall be, as it is expressly implied or promised to be. In sales of goods by persons in possession, there is an implied warranty of title. 4 (context insurance law English) A stipulation or engagement by a party insured, that certain things, relating to the subject of insurance, or affecting the risk, exist, or shall exist, or have been done, or shall be done. These warranties, when expressed, should appear in the policy; but there are certain implied warranties. 5 (context rare English) Justifying mandate or precept; authority; warrant. Shakespeare vb. To warrant; to guarantee.

WordNet
warranty

n. a written assurance that some product or service will be provided or will meet certain specifications [syn: guarantee, warrant, warrantee]

Wikipedia
Warranty

In contract law, a warranty has various meanings but generally means a guarantee or promise which provides assurance by one party to the other party that specific facts or conditions are true or will happen. This factual guarantee may be enforced regardless of materiality which allows for a legal remedy if that promise is not true or followed.

Although a warranty is in its simplest form an element of a contract, some warranties run with a product so that a manufacturer makes the warranty to a consumer with which the manufacturer has no direct contractual relationship.

A warranty may be express or implied, depending on whether the warranty is explicitly provided (typically written) and the jurisdiction. Warranties may also state that a particular fact is true at one point in time or that the fact will be continue into the future (a "promissory" or continuing warranty).

Usage examples of "warranty".

I confess, at once, that I cannot demonstrate, either by logic or by mathematics, a modern quitclaim or warranty in holding slaves.

When we establish our own warranties, personalized products, image, customer service policies and personahties, we are on our way to establishing proprietary inventory.

Some states do not allow disclaimers of implied warranties or the exclusion or limitation of consequential damages, so the above disclaimers and exclusions may not apply to you, and you may have other legal rights.

NO OTHER WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, ARE MADE TO YOU AS TO THE ETEXT OR ANY MEDIUM IT MAY BE ON, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGES But for the "Right of Replacement or Refund" described below, [1] Michael Hart and the Foundation (and any other party you may receive this etext from as a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext) disclaims all liability to you for damages, costs and expenses, including legal fees, and [2] YOU HAVE NO REMEDIES FOR NEGLIGENCE OR UNDER STRICT LIABILITY, OR FOR BREACH OF WARRANTY OR CONTRACT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF YOU GIVE NOTICE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

In the argument of Chudleigh's Case the line is drawn thus: "Always, the warranty as to voucher requires privity of estate to which it was annexed," (i.

So note a diversity between a use or warranty, and the like things annexed to the estate of the land in privity, and commons, advowsons, and other hereditaments annexed to the possession of the land.

      Coke, in his Commentary on Littleton (385 a), takes a distinction between a warranty, which binds the party to yield lands in recompense, and a covenant annexed to the land, which is to yield but damages.

In certain cases, of which the original and type was the ancient warranty, and of which the modern covenants for title are present examples, the sphere of succession was enlarged by the mention of assigns, and assigns are still allowed to represent the original covenantee for the purposes of that contract.

DISCLAIMER OF DAMAGES But for the "Right of Replacement or Refund" described below, [1] the Project (and any other party you may receive this etext from as a PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm etext) disclaims all liability to you for damages, costs and expenses, including legal fees, and [2] YOU HAVE NO REMEDIES FOR NEGLIGENCE OR UNDER STRICT LIABILITY, OR FOR BREACH OF WARRANTY OR CONTRACT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO INDIRECT, CONSEQUENTIAL, PUNITIVE OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF YOU GIVE NOTICE OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

Furthermore, this statement, as Lord Coke meant it, is perfectly consistent with the other and more important distinction between warranties and rights in the nature of easements or covenants creating such rights.

Covenants which started from the analogy of warranties, and others to which was applied the language and reasoning of easements, have been confounded together under the title of [401] covenants running with the land.

It was still under warranty, and came with general-purpose and cranial blades, as well as a skull key, to nearly complete his batterie de cuisine.

He unclipped the book of instructions and the 90-day warranty and handed them to Mary.

You didn't open it up and fool around with it because doing so would void the warranty.