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Crossword clues for spend

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
spend
verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a consumer/spending boom (=a sudden increase in the amount people spend)
▪ Various factors caused the consumer boom.
a spending pattern
▪ The bank’s computer can detect unusual spending patterns.
a spending pledgeBrE:
▪ I asked him to clarify Labour’s spending pledges.
a spending programme
▪ The government’s spending programme is the subject of vigorous debate.
a spending review
▪ Extra money was promised in last summer’s spending review.
buying/spending habits (=the kinds of things you buy regularly)
▪ The recession will mean that many people will be changing their spending habits.
compulsive gambling/overeating/spending etc
▪ Compulsive overspending in these days of credit cards has become more common.
consumer spending (also consumer expenditureformal)
▪ Higher taxes will reduce consumer spending.
cost/spend/pay a small fortune
▪ It must have cost him a small fortune.
cut spending/borrowing
▪ In the 1990s, governments worldwide cut military spending.
defence spending/expenditure
▪ There were plans to cut defence spending by one billion pounds.
government spending
▪ Government spending on health care totals about $60 billion a year.
have/spend Christmas
▪ No one wants to spend Christmas alone.
pocket money/spending moneyBritish English (= a small amount of money that parents regularly give their children)
▪ How much pocket money do you get?
public spending
▪ the Government’s public spending plans
spend a fortune
▪ You don’t have to spend a fortune giving your family healthy meals.
spend a night somewhere (=sleep somewhere)
▪ We spent two nights at the Grand Hotel.
spend a vacation
▪ Where did you spend your vacation?
spend an evening (=use an evening doing a particular thing)
▪ He spent many evenings alone in his room.
spend an hour
▪ I spent an hour reading.
spend money (on sth)
▪ More money should be spent on training.
spend the afternoon somewhere/doing sth
▪ We decided to spend the afternoon in town.
spend the day doing sth
▪ I spent the day shopping with my friends.
spend time
▪ I’m going to spend some time with my family.
spend time/three months/six years etc in jail
▪ Griffiths spent three days in jail after pushing a policeman.
spend your childhood
▪ This is the house where the artist spent most of his childhood.
spend your youth
▪ She spent her youth in India.
spending cuts
▪ His proposals could involve spending cuts of up to £12 billion.
spending limits
▪ There are strict spending limits imposed by law on all candidates.
spending money (=an amount of money that you can spend on anything you want)
▪ We had £500 spending money saved for our holiday.
spending money
spent...working life
▪ He spent all his working life in a factory.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
more
▪ Even with the present trade restrictions it is estimated that we spend more than £350 million on liquor abroad every year.
▪ Labor leaders worry that workers will end up spending more and more home time as well as office time working.
▪ As a general rule the only way to spend more per student was to have fewer students.
▪ The state spent more than $ 80, 000 to fight their lawsuit.
▪ Special offer of two nights five-star B &038; B for anyone spending more than £800.
▪ At forty-seven, Floyd had spent more than half his life with the Agency.
▪ Some farmers spend more on workers and some more on machinery.
▪ Card holders not only spend more, but are more loyal.
most
▪ You went through a period when you spent most of your time revising your existing works.
▪ Interbrew had spent most of 1997 negotiating with Toronto real estate developer Murray Frum.
▪ Labour politicians have spent most of their working lives promising to protect press freedom.
▪ You spend most of your time with your partner that you otherwise would be spending with other people.
▪ He spent most of it that night.
▪ They spent most of a record stuffing making big-hearted tackles and chasing shadows.
▪ Maremont pushed aside his business and civic work and spent most of the early summer barnstorming through Illinois.
together
▪ He hadn't loved Vanessa, but he had enjoyed the fourteen months they'd spent together here.
▪ Hours spent together are far more valuable than $ 500 worth of Babar wallpaper.
▪ We are a family that enjoys each other, relishing each day we're able to spend together.
▪ It is the most peaceful time he and I have spent together in at least two years.
▪ I remember waking with my face in it the first whole night we spent together.
▪ With such single-mindedness about their work, finding time to spend together is a challenge.
▪ It was all she had left of him and of the days they had spent together.
▪ Mr Yanase says he knows that this is simply the first of many Oshagatsu celebrations that we will spend together.
too
▪ Indiana has sometimes spent too much on tax incentives to lure companies inside its borders.
▪ He spent too long telling us what he was going to tell us.
▪ If it could be avoided, Yggdrasil did not want to spend too much time on the Princetown Input.
▪ Then we begin to blame each other for spending too much.
▪ Inpart, it was felt that governments were spending too much.
▪ Secondly, later cultures had to spend too much time, resources, and energy defending themselves against invaders.
▪ I'd spent too much of my life running away as it was.
▪ I spend too much time, perhaps, studying role models.
■ NOUN
afternoon
▪ He spent the morning and afternoon looking round Edinburgh.
▪ Miles began to gleefully spend an hour each afternoon sitting among his books.
▪ Her mum, having spent the afternoon fearing the worst, met Sally from school and started questioning her right away.
▪ I spent the afternoon working hard, but feeling in communion with the outdoors.
▪ We spent the afternoon being entertained, eating, drinking and representing Chelmsford.
▪ Ward had spent the afternoon preparing his talk to the New-York Historical Society.
▪ I spent all afternoon full of animosity towards him - and then he died in that freak accident.
▪ The carpenter was going to spend the afternoon with a woman who had once been a writer.
amount
▪ A&E staff spend a considerable amount of time in this type of work.
▪ We were spending an inordinate amount of time sending people to different meetings and not knowing what was going on.
▪ When those goals are respected, we may have the opportunity to spend increasing amounts.
▪ A typical business spends an amount equal to half of its annual earnings on employee health insurance.
▪ I spend enormous amounts of time trying to develop this characteristic in my company.
▪ Sometimes I thought I really spent the greatest amount of my time in an airplane seat flying between places.
▪ Investors spend considerable amounts of effort, time and money in their investigations into the firms behind the shares.
▪ They spent small amounts of money on load limitation experiments, but decided to do nothing.
billion
▪ Every year we spend $ 200 billion in federal taxes simply to pay interest on that debt.
▪ He aims to halve unemployment to four percent by 2000 by spending about 10 billion kronor to educate and train workers.
▪ California has to spend nearly $ 2 billion a year educating undocumented children.
▪ The Air Force has spent $ 6 billion so far without producing a single plane.
▪ Mediobanca is expected to have to spend about 240 billion lire to complete the public offer.
▪ Clinton proposes to spend about $ 3 billion to help cities and states create new jobs and prepare individuals to hold them.
▪ The Midland, Mich.-based chemical giant expects to spend $ 1 billion to achieve these goals, he said.
▪ It plans to spend another $ 10 billion between now and 2003.
consumer
▪ With exports flagging, Thaksin wants to boost consumer confidence and spending.
▪ The government set off a consumer spending boom last year by deregulating shop hours.
▪ This year we expect consumers to spend some £80 billion on leisure - almost one quarter of consumer spending.
▪ With corporations announcing big layoffs and the federal government partly shut down, consumers seemed reluctant to spend money.
▪ Neither is it being used to give a spurt to consumer spending, he said.
▪ Both meant consumers spent more in an attempt to avoid paying higher sales tax.
▪ Manufacturers cut jobs during November in response to weak consumer spending.
▪ As the news of layoffs and plant closings came to dominate the headlines and the airwaves, consumer spending dropped off sharply.
cut
▪ This would prevent further cuts in spending on health and education in a country already running on empty.
▪ The former Republican senator from Maine brings priorities that spell hope for companies worried about further cuts to military spending.
▪ He is in favor of drastic cuts in social spending in order to balance the budget.
▪ If deficits still exceeded projections a year later, tax cuts and spending increases would be canceled again in 2002.
▪ He wants massive cuts in defense spending to free up federal revenue for schools, health care and domestic programs.
▪ Sharif has rejected a cut in defense spending, which swallows about 35 percent of the budget.
▪ Dini also laid out the accomplishments of his term in the areas of electoral reform and cuts in government spending.
▪ She also was briefly unconscious and sustained a cut lip, and spent the night at Roosevelt Hospital.
day
▪ Angel and Tess decided to spend a day together shopping on Christmas Eve.
▪ We spent an hour each day in the cockpit and three or four hours in the bleachers watching our classmates.
▪ In the past you had to spend around £12 per day.
▪ He spent the day before his death searching for the right gift.
▪ He spent three days in jail after smashing up an apartment, and has done time in a drug rehabilitation centre.
▪ We spent the day washing windows five floors above the ground.
▪ A team of police have spent the day searching the area surrounding the house.
days
▪ We had spent some days in the hills of Mayo before deciding to go to Croagh Patrick.
▪ But Nash spent three days with the Timberwolves.
▪ They want to arrange their own lunches, decide for themselves how to spend some days.
▪ When my daughter seemed to lose interest in breastfeeding and demanded more solid food, I spent several days feeling depressed.
▪ He spent more than ten days in the neurology unit at Glasgow's Southern General before being allowed home.
▪ He spent his days at home, too disheartened to even turn on his computer.
▪ But there was no room there and the 22-year-old had spent the last six days in Middlesbrough police station.
▪ Pines residents spent their days in therapy learning about their own abuse and crimes.
dollar
▪ Each side has already spent several hundred million dollars on arms.
▪ Morris' description of how he spent unprecedented millions of dollars on polls and advertising is both stunning and disturbing.
▪ Those guys only wish that spending millions of dollars on a series of unrelated thrills had the power to transform them.
▪ R guys and spend zillions of dollars out of the box trying to get a hit.
▪ Marketing firms spend millions of dollars in the effort to find out what customers exist for planned or present services and products.
▪ The group has spent thousands of dollars trying to kill the McCain-Feingold bill.
▪ To defeat the 1990 California alcohol tax initiative, the alcohol industry spent thirty-eight million dollars.
▪ Companies are spending millions of dollars to drill for untapped onshore reserves.
evening
▪ I couldn't say where he spent that evening, not for certain.
▪ Many traders have spent the day evening their position ahead of those reports, traders said.
▪ I spent most evenings and every free period from college by your bedside.
▪ John Hall spent most of his evenings getting drunk with Jim Storter.
▪ He'd probably spend all evening making phone calls anyway.
▪ Four hours later I was driving to his house for dinner and we spent the evening just talking.
▪ They had spent a pleasant evening, and James had been most solicitous when he took his leave.
▪ Branson spent a frantic evening phoning around friends until he found her, and persuaded her to return.
fortune
▪ And he had been spending a fortune, perhaps as much as £300,000, on her.
▪ Most cities spend a fortune on their fire departments-often 20 percent of their entire general fund.
▪ We spend a fortune on the latest time-saving gadgets.
▪ And that's one reason why I spent a middle-sized fortune in the most advanced form in Intelloid in the universe.
▪ The estate already has spent a fortune litigating the matter.
▪ Denis, 71, has spent a fortune on his quest since the 1940s.
▪ Mr Levin has also spent a fortune in shareholder money to resolve the internal rivalries bedeviling his game plan for Time Warner.
government
▪ Double government spending on renewable energy research.
▪ That massive government spending has helped the construction industry survive the downturn.
▪ But there was no abrupt re-orientation of government spending towards the urban cores from 1977 to 1979.
▪ Only governments can afford to spend a quarter of a billion dollars each for the equivalent of plastic flamingos.
▪ The government has spent £1 billion on the Expo site alone and expects to recoup the cost from the visitors.
▪ This year the government is spending an estimated $ 13. 7 billion.
▪ The government spent lavishly to promote the process and promised a change for the better.
▪ Do I vote for lower taxes or do I vote for higher government spending?
hour
▪ She spends hours looking after her nails.
▪ We spent an hour each day in the cockpit and three or four hours in the bleachers watching our classmates.
▪ I spend hours of time with my engineers, briefing, de-briefing, briefing again.
▪ Gerard Baker had a double-bladed throwing ax, and he and I spent an hour or so fooling around with it.
▪ I hope you can help I have spent hours with Memax etc trying to understand this.
▪ We spent an hour just holding the door for people going in and out of the mall.
▪ With whom she had spent six hours or so.
▪ The defendants were said to have spent two hours on the base and taken photographs of themselves painting the aircraft.
hours
▪ He had spent the last few hours being photographed with the wounded and giving endless interviews.
▪ The idea is to reserve the precious parking spaces that car owners spend hours digging out of the snow.
▪ Adelaida Parra coordinates seven literacy groups each week spending long hours travelling by bus between the distant shanty towns.
▪ Symphony telemarketers spend about four hours a night and some Saturday afternoons phoning county residents from undecorated offices in Copley Symphony Hall.
▪ Together with his wife Lilian, the Group quality circle facilitator spends hours of his spare time counting cross-stitching.
▪ Bennett advises employees who work overseas to spend a few hours visiting people when they come to the home office.
▪ I spend hours of time with my engineers, briefing, de-briefing, briefing again.
▪ This week, Nakamura and the others are spending at least 10 hours a day in classroom studies.
jail
▪ Griffin spent three days in jail after he refused to give a breath sample.
▪ After spending Friday night in jail, he posted $ 500, 000 bond and was released Saturday morning.
▪ He spent three days in jail after smashing up an apartment, and has done time in a drug rehabilitation centre.
▪ Not because Sharpe already has spent time in jail.
▪ The plotters were arrested and spent a year in jail awaiting trial.
▪ After his arrest, he spent 12 hours in jail.
▪ He spent 28 months in jail and was sentenced to death.
▪ The man has ninety-one previous convictions, but was released because he had already spent time in jail on remand.
life
▪ They always appear to be happy and spend their lives trying to help others.
▪ She has spent her life trying to make me feel guilty.
▪ At seventeen, he announces that he wants to spend his whole life in a ruined castle by the sea.
▪ Cora J.. Rupp has spent her life immersed in art and wishes more of us would jump into the pool.
▪ I've spent my whole life looking back.
▪ She has spent most of her life nurturing little ones: two children, seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild.
▪ Determined not spend my life in this manner, I continued to reapply to the postgraduate art courses.
lot
▪ The first woman spent the lot, the second spent half and banked the rest and the third invested the full amount.
▪ He has begun composing again, so he spends a lot of time in the drawing room.
▪ She spent a lot of time on the beach before she became ill.
▪ Over the days I spent a lot of time with Maureen.
▪ My local authority spends a lot of money simply issuing court summonses and trying to pursue people for non-payment.
▪ He spends a lot of time developing his people.
▪ I spend a lot of time on the bathroom scales - too much time - I really should throw them away!
▪ During my third year I spent a lot of time as a public defender.
million
▪ Jane Dee Hull and some development interests, who spent $ 1.2 million on the campaign.
▪ This year they will spend $ 83 million.
▪ To defeat the 1990 California alcohol tax initiative, the alcohol industry spent thirty-eight million dollars.
▪ The state of California would spend another $ 130 million to buy the redwood groves.
▪ There have been previous estimates that he had spent $ 12 million thus far.
▪ Wilson wants to spend $ 83 million to buy an off- the- shelf test to begin gauging the progress of students.
▪ He spent $ 4 million of his own money on the Arizona contest alone.
minutes
▪ Once each has had a turn, the group may spend a few minutes discussing possible methods of achieving any identified learning needs.
▪ The movie lasts almost three hours and the two stars spend around 10 minutes together.
▪ Let's say you get up in the morning and spend 15 minutes sitting down for breakfast.
▪ For ten days we ate together, slept together, never spent two minutes apart.
▪ You'd probably spend no more than 30 minutes on each image.
▪ Even then I spent five minutes beating my thighs in the dark as the bus rolled down the road.
▪ Kasparov sealed his 41st move, spending 25 minutes over it, and upon resumption forced a winning endgame without difficulty.
▪ Then the players spent several minutes walking into the stands, mingling with fans and shaking hands.
money
▪ We want to talk to some one about the vast amounts of money that are spent on advertising.
▪ My writing is based on the assumption that the less money you spend, the more authentic your experience.
▪ Most of the money has been spent on improving the accommodation for students.
▪ Clearly, one feature of accountability is the need to show that public money is being spent in publicly approved ways.
▪ Female athletes, the survey found, received a little more than a third of the money spent on all athletic scholarships.
month
▪ They spent their first months, sometimes a year, bound tightly in swaddling bands.
▪ Roith spent his first nine months within the government listening to people.
▪ She spent the next 18 months putting a brave face on her illness, with lots of loving support from George.
▪ The plan was to fly to the Cook islands, and spend at least three months alone on a desert island.
▪ We would spend a month at Orange learning the basics of marching, singing, fitness, weapons drill and Legion history.
▪ But she refuses to spend the next seven months in hospital - and I can't say I blame her.
▪ I once spent many months as a student using the papers of Francis Place, the radical reformer of early nineteenth-century Westminster.
▪ People spend six months making their costumes.
months
▪ They spent their first months, sometimes a year, bound tightly in swaddling bands.
▪ Officers only spent 6 months in the field before they were moved back to the rear.
▪ Roith spent his first nine months within the government listening to people.
▪ This year, the state Legislature spent months debating a bill that would have banned the teaching of evolution as fact.
▪ The directors and actors had spent months in zoos recording the noises made by apes in emotional situations.
▪ I spent 16 months there in the Army!
▪ His hair was dishevelled, his beard had grown around his neck as if he had spent the past four months away from civilisation.
▪ They spent nine months developing a set of 98 goals in 12 general areas.
morning
▪ Now they have to spend their mornings planning budgets and their afternoons paying bills.
▪ The students spend several mornings a week at work sites associated with their divisions.
▪ Kevin Brown had spent the morning secluded in his office beneath the embassy.
▪ We spent our mornings snorkeling, spearfishing, and diving.
▪ He spent the morning and afternoon looking round Edinburgh.
▪ The wire was wound tight, the boys had spent all morning on the project.
▪ He spent the morning in jovial mood as guest of honour at a sponsorship of the arts award ceremony.
▪ They would spend the morning walking around the town and then visit Arijs in the Institution.
night
▪ He asked me whether I would prefer to see Bologna and spend the night there, or to drive directly to Verona.
▪ Are you sure this is all right, Stella? l mean my spending the night?
▪ Twice Ferdinando had come down to spend the night with her and twice she had refused him without offering any adequate reason.
▪ I spend many a night, hollow and vigilant.
▪ But he went on to say he knew I'd spent the night at your place.
▪ After spending Friday night in jail, he posted $ 500, 000 bond and was released Saturday morning.
▪ Neither was I in the mood for long debates about where we were going to spend Saturday night.
▪ She spent the night at the Fairmont Hotel and was expected to fly out of the city early Friday.
rest
▪ You loved some one; you wanted to spend the rest of your life with them.
▪ We spent the rest of our month doing what we could for Maryvonne and Ichiro.
▪ As if saying you want to spend the rest of your life with the same person somehow makes you a flawed bore.
▪ Ciotilde then spent the rest of her life tending to the needy.
▪ She would call on them, and then she would spend the rest of the day shopping.
▪ Could I possibly spend the rest of my life in this holy place?
▪ I spent the rest of the morning being shown some of the routine duties of a catering assistant.
▪ A man can spend the rest of his experimental life chasing after a rainbow.
summer
▪ So guess where one of my weeks will be spent this summer?
▪ She was coming from Washington State, where she had spent the summer picking apples.
▪ Well, do you remember when I was nineteen I spent the summer at the Sorbonne in Paris?
▪ At the beginning, I spent the whole summer reading everything du Maurier had written.
▪ When my father was ten, he spent the summer at an old fashioned sleep-away camp.
▪ I spent the whole summer in the sun, often in the sea or swimming pools.
▪ Buell recalls spending vacations and summer months picking garlic and onions in Gilroy and asparagus in Stockton.
time
▪ Decentralisation Finally we need to spend some time considering the role of decentralised administration in the public sector.
▪ But now because of the religious obligation I am spending more time with my family.
▪ Over the past year Alastair has spent more time cycling, putting in up to 150 miles a week.
▪ It hopes to maintain the small size of most classes by encouraging faculty to spend more time teaching.
▪ Charlie was a cockney by birth but he'd spent time in New York.
▪ Required to spend more time with Matilda, Agnes finds that her encounters with the curate dwindle and almost cease altogether.
▪ So I did not spend all my time peering upwards, searching the skies for those rumoured golden eagles.
▪ But remember, the goal of making a date is to spend time together, not necessarily to spend money together.
week
▪ They now live in Cumbernauld after spending a two week honeymoon in Torquay.
▪ Now I spend two hours a week on it, though, because my boss wants me to.
▪ I spent the next week and a half in a cold sweat.
▪ He had spent the week debating whether she was important to him or simply using him, or both.
▪ To be sure, retail spending figures released last week, also were stronger than expected.
▪ I was already spending $ 60 per week for supplement.
weekend
▪ So for a little over £100 it is easy to spend a long weekend in Paris in the spring, summer or whenever.
▪ The embassy spokesman said she had spent the weekend on a family visit to Britain, where she was born and raised.
▪ It so happens that Couvelaire spends one or two weekends a month in his old family home in Biarritz.
▪ Harriman had spent the past weekend in Britain to attend the christening of a great-granddaughter, the employees said.
▪ On several occasions we spent weekends working furiously hard in small groups at drafts of attainment targets and programmes of study.
▪ Apart from a spot of cooking she was planning to spend the whole weekend on her sculpt.
▪ It is possible to spend a really full weekend in Paris for £150 each, and that's without holding back.
year
▪ Many of the speakers came from a local government background, having spent years in social services or as councillors.
▪ The trip awakened many boyhood memories, and Warnie remarked that they might do worse than spend their declining years there.
▪ The poor farmer spent a joyful year in her company, during which he learned many wonderful secrets.
▪ Andean birds spend much of the year in conditions almost as tough.
▪ He spent three years on it till he got into Sakata.
▪ William Chorleton had returned to spend his last two years at the School.
years
▪ Previously spend 17 years as an accountant in the bakery industry.
▪ After spending a few years in the U.S.
▪ Wilcock was to spend the next thirty years attempting to put it into practice.
▪ Lanterman spent his last years in the Assembly watching his legislation spread the seeds of homelessness, confusion and frustration.
▪ We had spent years pressing for this event and then battled for months about every detail of our plans.
▪ I spent all the Reagan years on this one case.
▪ The council commissioned a yearlong study of the problem, which looked at revenue and spending forecasts for 20 years.
■ VERB
force
▪ He had a bad attack of bronchitis during February and was forced to spend ten days in hospital.
▪ But because of the blizzard nearly all federal workers here were forced to spend another day away from the office.
▪ The entire party, even the persistent Mr Gould, was forced to spend an entire day on board ship.
▪ The tribes will be forced to spend money they badly need for other things to defeat it.
▪ But many feel that they are being forced to spend large amounts of time unnecessarily testing pupils and recording achievement.
▪ When they sue you, and lose, they should reimburse you for what they forced you to spend.
▪ For they meant that she was forced to spend the entire weekend in Jake's company.
▪ The fear of pending competition has forced network operators to spend heavily on upgrades.
increase
▪ This shows how intermediation via Euromarket banks can increase the volume of spending for a given monetary base.
▪ And park enthusiasts pressed for increased city spending on recreation programs and park staffing.
▪ We have increased the amount being spent on the coastguard service and a good coastguard service is available to our coastline.
▪ The company also increased marketing spending more than sixfold in 1995.
▪ We shall do this while continuing to increase spending on the essential public services on which we all depend.
▪ But then Wisconsin proved Washington wrong; while spending per family has increased, overall spending has declined with the caseload.
▪ Airplanes, promoted to save travel time, increase it as people spend more time traveling than ever before.
▪ In his first three years in office, Reagan increased defense spending, in real terms, by 40 percent.
plan
▪ Instead of ironing, as she'd planned, she'd spend the evening with her sketchpad.
▪ Instead, Thyssen Stahl plans to spend 750 million marks this year mostly on expanding high-tech domestic operations.
▪ She also received a rose arbour for her garden where she plans to spend more time in her retirement.
▪ Reed said the group plans to spend more than $ 750, 000 for its convention operations.
▪ After a winter of crisis in Britain's hospitals the Chancellor brought forward part of his planned summer spending round.
▪ The Taylors had planned to spend only a night here.
▪ The group plans to spend $ 500m expanding the existing diesel engine plant, creating 500 jobs in five years.
▪ Management was planning to spend $ 1 million to double the size of the tipping floor, where the trucks unloaded.
want
▪ The more it wants to limit spending, the less freedom local councils can have to raise their own revenue.
▪ Adults of a certain age might want to spend a couple of hundred dollars more for a 17-inch monitor.
▪ If it could be avoided, Yggdrasil did not want to spend too much time on the Princetown Input.
▪ They want leaders to spend time helping them understand how change can happen.
▪ They are now together and Robert says' I am so happy having found some one I want to spend my life with.
▪ Dole wants to spend more money on national defense.
▪ Verdict: An adequate performer if you don't want to spend more than £100.
▪ He said Democrats want to spend the money on education, training and other programs.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a spent force
▪ But after four consecutive General Election defeats, is Labour a spent force?
▪ Jesse Jackson, who ran for president in 1984 and 1988, is a spent force.
▪ On the other hand, it would be a mistake to conclude that the urban-rural shift is a spent force.
▪ They write off Ireland as a spent force, which in my experience is a foolish thing to do.
spend the night with sb/spend the night together
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Dani spends hours on the phone.
▪ During the recession, even the tourists weren't spending.
▪ Everyone spends more at Christmas - it's an important time for business.
▪ Fay spent a year in Italy teaching English.
▪ He spent the whole morning reading the report.
▪ I bought two skirts and a T-shirt and I only spent $50.
▪ I never seem to have any time to spend with the children.
▪ Mom spent most of the weekend cleaning up the house.
▪ She spends most of her salary on clothes.
▪ The government has promised to spend more money on education.
▪ They spend quite a lot of money each week on eating out.
▪ We spend about £85 a week on food.
▪ We spent a lot of energy looking for a nice apartment.
▪ We spent the week in a dingy motel off Route 9.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ A diabetic, she spent two days in the hospital last week when stress sent her blood pressure rocketing.
▪ All travelers apparently will be spending more time outdoors this summer.
▪ At seventeen, he announces that he wants to spend his whole life in a ruined castle by the sea.
▪ Children are particularly at risk because of the amount of time they spend out of doors.
▪ Customers receive additional Clubcard points for every £2 spent on a Tesco Credit card.
▪ Now they spend quite a bit of their money, which is nice.
▪ Reagan and Gorbachev spent nine hours and forty-eight minutes in face-to-face negotiations.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Spend

Spend \Spend\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Spent; p. pr. & vb. n. Spending.] [AS. spendan (in comp.), fr. L. expendere or dispendere to weigh out, to expend, dispense. See Pendant, and cf. Dispend, Expend, Spence, Spencer.]

  1. To weigh or lay out; to dispose of; to part with; as, to spend money for clothing.

    Spend thou that in the town.
    --Shak.

    Wherefore do ye spend money for that which is not bread?
    --Isa. lv.

  2. 2. To bestow; to employ; -- often with on or upon.

    I . . . am never loath To spend my judgment.
    --Herbert.

  3. To consume; to waste; to squander; to exhaust; as, to spend an estate in gaming or other vices.

  4. To pass, as time; to suffer to pass away; as, to spend a day idly; to spend winter abroad.

    We spend our years as a tale that is told.
    --Ps. xc. 9.

  5. To exhaust of force or strength; to waste; to wear away; as, the violence of the waves was spent.

    Their bodies spent with long labor and thirst.
    --Knolles.

Spend

Spend \Spend\, v. i.

  1. To expend money or any other possession; to consume, use, waste, or part with, anything; as, he who gets easily spends freely.

    He spends as a person who knows that he must come to a reckoning.
    --South.

  2. To waste or wear away; to be consumed; to lose force or strength; to vanish; as, energy spends in the using of it.

    The sound spendeth and is dissipated in the open air.
    --Bacon.

  3. To be diffused; to spread.

    The vines that they use for wine are so often cut, that their sap spendeth into the grapes.
    --Bacon.

  4. (Mining) To break ground; to continue working.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
spend

"to pay out or away" (money or wealth), Old English -spendan (in forspendan "use up"), from Medieval Latin spendere, a shortening of Latin expendere "to weigh out money, pay down" (see expend) or possibly of dispendere "to pay out." A general Germanic borrowing (Old High German spendon, German and Middle Dutch spenden, Old Norse spenna). In reference to labor, thoughts, time, etc., attested from c.1300. Intransitive sense "exhaust, wear (oneself) out" is from 1590s (see spent).

Wiktionary
spend

n. 1 Amount spent (during a period), expenditure 2 (context pluralized English) expenditures; money or pocket money. vb. To pay out (money).

WordNet
spend
  1. v. pass (time) in a specific way; "How are you spending your summer vacation?" [syn: pass]

  2. pay out; "spend money" [syn: expend, drop]

  3. spend completely; "I spend my pocket money in two days"

  4. [also: spent]

Wikipedia
Spend (The Walking Dead)

"Spend" is the 14th episode of the fifth season of the post-apocalyptic horror television series The Walking Dead, which aired on AMC on March 15, 2015. It marked Tyler James Williams' final appearance as the supporting character Noah and Daniel Bonjour's final appearance as Aiden Monroe.

Usage examples of "spend".

He was therefore accommodated with a second-hand suit and another shirt, and at once listed under the banners of Count Fathom, who spent the whole afternoon in giving him proper instructions for the regulation of his conduct.

He even spent some years with the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, the primary rules setter for the profession.

Still, with so much of the reported profits tied to mark-to-market accounting, Enron brought in comparatively little actual cash, the commodity desperately needed to pay for all of the spending and new businesses.

After two days of riding the wall, and time spent in the evening studying the ward-wall patrol manual that Maran had provided, his eyes tend to blur whenever he looks toward the chaos and whitened granite that prisons the Accursed Forest.

Five days earlier, Ann had spent most of the day caring for her afflicted daughter Ann and maid Mercy Lewis.

So I spent the better part of Tuesday calling each on the phone, dropping by in person in the case of the nurse-practitioner, the allergy doctor, and our minister, to explain the situation and ask if I might give the GAL their names.

To her mind Zephyr spent far too much time going over old texts and bits of pottery, hiking up to caves that only contained paintings instead of allosaur bones.

She had already spent much of her allotment on a keyboard with letters and numbers to attach to her room screen.

No focus anymore, just mindless ambling, spending his blood, dying in profound shock and absolute terror.

Movements of precious metals and ambulatory currency spiked metropolitan areas, while consumer spending showed up as gangs of small people, one per million, flashing their spending areas and products like dust motes dancing on sunlight.

For the time being, we enjoyed a kind of amplified friendship, spending our leisure moments together, our physical contact limited to hand-holding and kisses on the cheek.

Maybe it was because we had spent those years as analyst and analysand that I had little hesitation in talking to her about it.

Broken hearted over these letters, Camilla spent her time in their perpetual perusal, in wiping from them her tears, and pressing with fond anguish to her lips the signature of her hapless sister, self-beguiled by her own credulous goodness, and self-devoted by her conscientious scruples.

Yoshiko experimented for a few minutes with the hand controller, getting the feel of the thrusters, while Tessa filmed the whole process, showing the people back home the ungainly, angular LM perched atop the spent third stage booster, and Yoshiko peering out the tiny windows as she concentrated on bringing the CSM around until the docking collar at the top of the capsule pointed at the hatch on top of the LM.

The court, which by now had had about all it could take of bedroom antics, decided that Thorpe was no saint himself, and ordered that the child spend nine months of the year with Mary, and the three-month summer vacation with her father.