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snowmelt

n. runoff from melting snow

Wikipedia
Snowmelt

In hydrology, snowmelt is surface runoff produced from melting snow. It can also be used to describe the period or season during which such runoff is produced. Water produced by snowmelt is an important part of the annual water cycle in many parts of the world, in some cases contributing high fractions of the annual runoff in a watershed. Predicting snowmelt runoff from a drainage basin may be a part of designing water control projects. Rapid snowmelt can cause flooding. If the snowmelt is then frozen, very dangerous conditions and accidents can occur, introducing the need for salt to melt the ice.

Usage examples of "snowmelt".

The first wave of blackflies had hatched from the snowmelt and the ponies were under assault.

A thousand tributaries wound through steep gorges, the beginnings of snowmelt sending them brawling and tossing around boulders,a few quiet stretches were flat and glittering with ice.

The Yampa was still swollen with snowmelt and it flowed laconically, like an overstuffed hog, toward its distant marriage with the Green River.

The river would be in full spate, especially now with the spring snowmelts from the Shenandoah Valley and the Blue Ridge Mountains.

For this short patch, the road paralleled the silver twist of Grandmother's Tears, a river of snowmelt from Grandfather's Shoulder that joined with the Great Downrush a few klicks from Pelek Baw.

The ditch was running with snowmelt, littered with filthy newspaper, shreds of tire rubber, and beer cans as empty as the bean can surely would be soon, but the small pilgrims let themselves be swallowed up by it as though it were a glory road.

But if the same thing happened every winter—and the meteorologists believed that the coming winters would drop even more snow, and the coming summers get ever warmer—then their town would quickly be inundated by snowmelt, and Phillips Rim Crater Four become a lake full to the brim.

But if the same thing happened every winter-and the meteorologists believed that the coming winters would drop even more snow, and the coming summers get ever warmer-then their town would quickly be inundated by snowmelt, and Phillips Rim Crater Four become a lake full to the brim.

I puffed up the last hunk of trail, which was all grown together with weeds and snowmelts, and there was that big sentinel lodgepole pine Dad always told me about.

Snowmelt coursed down a number of rivulet channels, pooling and dropping through any number of potential meadow terraces, little diatom oases, falling down the basin to meet in the gravel wadi at the gate to the land below, a flat meadow-to-be behind the residual rim.

Bending awkwardly, I scooped out a cup of pelletized de-icer from the open bag sitting beside the door and sprinkled it on the steps before the afternoon’s snowmelt had a chance to freeze.

A thousand tributaries wound through steep gorges, the beginnings of snowmelt sending them brawling and tossing around boulders, a few quiet stretches were flat and glittering with ice.