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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
prose
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
purple
▪ William Holden plays a hack scriptwriter down on his luck, and his purple prose gives the film its biting tone.
▪ Lady Thatcher will be honing her purple prose for the debate in the Lords.
■ NOUN
style
▪ Or has Mrs Cooper's prose style got to her?
▪ In other words, there is no one model of prose style which is applicable to all texts.
▪ In the following chapter, we shall use relatively short passages for exemplifying the analysis of prose style.
▪ And not least among his endowments is the command of a prose style which makes what he writes a pleasure to read.
■ VERB
write
▪ After all, women can't write good classical prose.
▪ Straus could have spent his life clipping coupons, safari hunting, or writing the hyperventilating prose that was his second love.
▪ It was brief, pithy and, like everything Lewis wrote in prose, hugely readable.
▪ I write reams of dry prose with appropriately technical language and what my colleagues consider scientific consequence.
▪ He wrote his prose poems originally in Arabic and they have now been translated into more than 20 other languages.
▪ She writes in minimalist prose, sometimes in staccato rhythms.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
deathless prose/verse/lines etc
▪ It won't be deathless prose, but it should be a grammatical and effective piece of writing.
purple prose/passage
▪ In his maturity what he remembered of his style of speaking were purple passages and a rather caustic irony.
▪ Lady Thatcher will be honing her purple prose for the debate in the Lords.
▪ William Holden plays a hack scriptwriter down on his luck, and his purple prose gives the film its biting tone.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Brown's prose is simple and direct.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ An aggressive self-publicist, her inflamed prose brought her much notoriety.
▪ In other words, there is no one model of prose style which is applicable to all texts.
▪ Joe was the stylist, throwing in literary references and lingering over their prose until it had a lilt.
▪ Kingsolver's fecund prose is always reader-friendly, though we are directed to her messages with too heavy a hand.
▪ Poets seem to write more easily about love than prose writers.
▪ Straus could have spent his life clipping coupons, safari hunting, or writing the hyperventilating prose that was his second love.
▪ The prose of this chapter measures the adequacy of verbal accounts of catastrophe in the age of photographic reproduction.
▪ There is not a great deal of readable prose in the field.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Prose

Prose \Prose\, n. [F. prose, L. prosa, fr. prorsus, prosus, straight forward, straight on, for proversus; pro forward + versus, p. p. of vertere to turn. See Verse.]

  1. The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; -- contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition.

    I speak in prose, and let him rymes make.
    --Chaucer.

    Things unattempted yet in prose or rhyme.
    --Milton.

    I wish our clever young poets would remember my homely definitions of prose and poetry, that is; prose -- words in their best order; poetry -- the best order.
    --Coleridge.

  2. Hence, language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.

  3. (R. C. Ch.) A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. See Sequence.

Prose

Prose \Prose\, a.

  1. Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition.

  2. Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life.

Prose

Prose \Prose\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Prosed; p. pr. & vb. n. Prosing.]

  1. To write in prose.

  2. To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.

Prose

Prose \Prose\, v. i. 1. To write prose.

Prosing or versing, but chiefly this latter.
--Milton.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
prose

c.1300, "story, narration," from Old French prose (13c.), from Latin prosa oratio "straightforward or direct speech" (without the ornaments of verse), from prosa, fem. of prosus, earlier prorsus "straightforward, direct," from Old Latin provorsus "(moving) straight ahead," from pro- "forward" (see pro-) + vorsus "turned," past participle of vertere "to turn" (see verse).\n\n"Good prose, to say nothing of the original thoughts it conveys, may be infinitely varied in modulation. It is only an extension of metres, an amplification of harmonies, of which even the best and most varied poetry admits but few."

[Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]

\nMeaning "prose writing; non-poetry" is from mid-14c. The sense of "dull or commonplace expression" is from 1680s, out of earlier sense "plain expression" (1560s). Those who lament the want of an English agent noun to correspond to poet might try prosaist (1776), proser (1620s), or Frenchified prosateur (1880), though the first two in their day also acquired in English the secondary sense "dull writer."
Wiktionary
prose

n. 1 Language, particularly written language, not intended as poetry. 2 Language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse. 3 (context Roman Catholicism English) A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. vb. to write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way

WordNet
prose
  1. n. ordinary writing as distinguished from verse

  2. matter of fact, commonplace, or dull expression

Wikipedia
Prose

Prose is a form of language that exhibits a grammatical structure and a natural flow of speech, rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry. Where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme, the common unit of prose is purely grammatical, such as a sentence or paragraph.

Usage examples of "prose".

This lyrical style was the first aspect of his prose that attracted general attention to his individuality.

I feel that Steven Brust has this whole catalog of virtues - solid plotting, good prose, insightful characterizations and fine dialogue.

Yes, I feel that Steven Brust has this whole catalog of virtues - solid plotting, good prose, insightful characterizations and fine dialogue.

In the wake of the groundbreaking prose fiction written by members of the Natural school, literary realists in mid-nineteenth-century Russia were able to use food imagery and fictional meals in their works in less Rabelaisian and more mimetically purposeful ways: that is, as metonyms or synecdoches through which to describe contemporary social reality.

Lindeth and Tiffany enjoyed a quiet flirtation, Sir Ralph gave the Nonesuch a long and involved account of his triumph over someone who had tried to get the better of him in a bargain, Courtenay fidgeted about the room, and Lady Colebatch prosed to Miss Trent with all the placidity of one to whom time meant nothing.

The next morning Patu called and made me a present of his prose panegyric on the Marechal de Saxe.

My brother Lionel is, no doubt, an excellent penman, but when it comes to genius such as yours, Sergeant, you need a light touch and a real gift for writing prose.

What with struggling with an 18-page glossary of terms, and concentrating on perfervid prose which makes that of H.

The texts of the motets were generally in prose, and the early polyphonists saw no obvious reason for imposing upon this essentially rectilinear material a circular musical form.

Commend us to one picturesque, garrulous old fellow, like Froissart, or Philip de Comines, or Bishop Burnet, before all the philosophic prosers that ever prosed.

Instead of versifying prose, they found it necessary, because of the nature of their art form, to prosify verse.

But his whole teaching and practice tended towards an identity of speech between prose and verse, the prosodical pattern or ornament being the sole feature which distinguished the latter from the former.

Here is a writer who has been around for three decades, and who is perhaps the premier stylist in the science fiction genre in terms of fusing prose, tone, viewpoint, content and mood into a seamless synergetic whole.

But here, as we are about to attempt a description hitherto unassayed either in prose or verse, we think proper to invoke the assistance of certain aerial beings, who will, we doubt not, come kindly to our aid on this occasion.

Similarly, take a bit of unpunctuated prose, add the dots and flourishes in the right place, stand back, and what have you got?