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Pepe (footballer, born 1935)

José Macia, better known as Pepe (born February 25, 1935 in Santos, São Paulo) is a former association footballer and manager. He was a left winger for Santos and the Brazilian national team. His nickname was "Canhão da Vila" (The Vila Cannon), because of his potent kick with his left leg and the fact that Santos plays in the Estádio Urbano Caldera, nicknamed Vila Belmiro.

He claims to be "the greatest human striker in the history of Santos – because Pelé is from Saturn".

Pepe (film)

Pepe is a 1960 film starring Mario Moreno ("Cantinflas") in the title role, directed by George Sidney. The film contained a multitude of cameo appearances, attempting to replicate the success of Mario Moreno's American debut, Around the World in 80 Days.

The film failed to achieve the success of Cantinflas' previous American film and was roundly criticized by film critics. A VHS tape of the film was released on December 7, 1998; in 2015, it began streaming on Netflix.

Pepe (footballer, born 1983)

Képler Laveran Lima Ferreira, (born 26 February 1983), commonly known as Pepe , is a Portuguese professional footballer who plays for Spanish club Real Madrid and the Portuguese national team as a central defender. During his professional career he has played for Marítimo, Porto and Real Madrid, with individual and team success with the latter two clubs. A physically strong and tenacious defender, he is known for his aggressive challenges and for his violent behaviour on the pitch.

Born and raised in Brazil, Pepe has represented Portugal over 70 times, playing at two World Cups and three European Championships, and was a member of the team that won UEFA Euro 2016, also reaching the semi-final of UEFA Euro 2012.

Pepe

Pepe may refer to:

  • A pet form of the Spanish name José
Pepe (song)

"Pepe" is a 1960 song written by Hans Wittstatt and Dory Previn for the musical comedy film Pepe, featuring Mario Moreno ("Cantinflas") in the lead role. It was first recorded by Shirley Jones for the movie. Duane Eddy covered the song the same year. There have also been several other cover versions of this song.

Pepe (Haiti)

In Haiti, pepe may refer to secondhand clothes that are commonly worn by its population. These clothes are usually sent from the United States. The Haitian textile industry has suffered due to the widespread popularity of pepe. There have even been discussions about banning the import of pepe. However, this is unlikely since the general population continues to wear pepe, which include many brand names that otherwise would be inaccessible.

The import of pepe began in the 1960s, during the Kennedy administration, leading to the moniker "Kennedy clothes". Since the 1980s, hundreds of tons of pepe has been imported, usually packaged in huge bales. The clothes are so affordable, that a used boy's t-shirt from the United States could be sold for as little as thirteen cents in Haiti. Furthermore, at an affordable cost, local seamstresses make modifications to the clothing.

In recent years, Haiti has seen an increase in the amount of clothing coming from the United States as a result of fast fashion.

Usage examples of "pepe".

Pepe Boltana, CEO of the Banco de Corpus Cristi whose head office is on Grand Cayman.

The banker at the gaming table was a certain Don Joseph Marratti, the same man whom I had known in the Spanish army under the name of Don Pepe il Cadetto, and a few years afterwards assumed the name of Afflisio, and came to such a bad end.

Why, one, Pepe Llula, the most famous duelist of his time, became the guardian of a cemetery just so, as gossip rumored, he could have some place to bury his opponents.

Pepe il Cadetto, whose acquaintance I had made at the time of my arrest in the Spanish army, and whom I had met afterwards in Venice and in Lyons, under the name of Don Joseph Marcati.

However, Don Pepe continued, the mozo who brought the letter said that Don Carlos Gould was alive, and so far unmolested.

Pepe leaned over and kissed Bridget on the cheek, which skeeved me out.

Pepe has this hopeless crush on Bridget, who has looked bootylicious and legal since seventh grade.

The banker at the gaming table was a certain Don Joseph Marratti, the same man whom I had known in the Spanish army under the name of Don Pepe il Cadetto, and a few years afterwards assumed the name of Afflisio, and came to such a bad end.

Pepe il Cadetto, whose acquaintance I had made at the time of my arrest in the Spanish army, and whom I had met afterwards in Venice and in Lyons, under the name of Don Joseph Marcati.

The name of the banker was Don Pepe il Cadetto, and by his accent I knew he was a Neapolitan.

One day, having gone with Campioni to dine at "The Crawfish," I found, to my great surprise, sitting at the table d'hote, that Pepe il Cadetto, whose acquaintance I had made at the time of my arrest in the Spanish army, and whom I had met afterwards in Venice and in Lyons, under the name of Don Joseph Marcati.

And she danced out into the pista, where Florian was introducing "l'audace Signorina Pepe!

That was succeeded by a greater roar of applause as Florian presented the resurrected artiste—"Ancora una volta, l'audace Signorina Pepe!

Bill Abrams, Ross Baughman, Charles Bell, Laurence Bergreen, John Bethell, Sara Bethell, Lisa Colt, Sandy Colt, Byron Dobell, Lars Engle, Rob Farnsworth, Campbell Geeslin, Eric Gibson, Paula Glatzer, Peter Gradjansky, Maggie Hivnor, Kathy Holub, Rhonda Johnson, Pepe Karmel, Susan McCarthy, Charlie Monheim, Mark O'Donnell, Dan Okrent, Julie Salamon, Kathy Schuler, Carol Whitmore, and Sherri Yingst fielded my questions with good grace.

After receiving the report from the policeman on guard, he had them open the cell where Pepe Amador seemed to be in a deep sleep face down on the brick floor.