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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mite
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
little
▪ But we both agreed the little mite was the spitting image of the man.
▪ The little mite had objected strongly.
▪ A baby, poor little mite.
red
▪ Spraying with water is particularly effective for discouraging red spider mite, which flourishes in dry conditions.
▪ There are no pesticides approved against red spider mites on sugar beet.
▪ In recent hot summers, red spider mite has become a severe problem in some gardens.
▪ Dry air in the greenhouse will encourage pests such as red spider mite.
▪ Pest problems Greenhouse crops are susceptible to greenfly, whitefly and red spider mite which all feed on the leaves.
■ NOUN
dust
▪ Pollution and house dust mites are the main culprits.
▪ The dust mite, which thrives in warm, moist air, is the greatest source of allergens for asthmatics.
▪ Some people are allergic to molds, dust mites, animal dander or cockroaches.
spider
▪ Spraying with water is particularly effective for discouraging red spider mite, which flourishes in dry conditions.
▪ There are no pesticides approved against red spider mites on sugar beet.
▪ In recent hot summers, red spider mite has become a severe problem in some gardens.
▪ Dry air in the greenhouse will encourage pests such as red spider mite.
▪ Pest problems Greenhouse crops are susceptible to greenfly, whitefly and red spider mite which all feed on the leaves.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ On the other hand, aphids can infect raspberries with incurable virus diseases, and blackcurrant reversion is spread by big-bud mites.
▪ Some teachers take everything a mite too serious.
▪ Spraying with water is particularly effective for discouraging red spider mite, which flourishes in dry conditions.
▪ The dust mite, which thrives in warm, moist air, is the greatest source of allergens for asthmatics.
▪ The little mite had objected strongly.
▪ Then she trailed her fingers through the flour, parting, separating small hills and ridges of it, looking for mites.
▪ When an ant comes near it, the mite will strum vigorously with its long front legs.
▪ With all respect to my old friend, I believe my aims and basic purposes may have gone a mite deeper.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Mite

Mite \Mite\ (m[imac]t), n. [AS. m[=i]te mite (in sense 1); akin to LG. mite, D. mijt, G. miete, OHG. m[=i]za; cf. Goth. maitan to cut.]

  1. (Zo["o]l.) A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the dust mite, cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, three-toed spider mite, etc. See Acarina.

  2. [D. mijt; prob. the same word.] A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. The name is also applied to a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.

    Two mites, which make a farthing.
    --Mark xii. 49.

  3. A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.

  4. Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle.

    For in effect they be not worth a myte.
    --Chaucer.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
mite

"tiny animal, minute arachnid," Old English mite, from Proto-Germanic *miton (cognates: Middle Dutch mite, Dutch mijt, Old High German miza, Danish mide) originally meaning perhaps "the cutter," in reference to its bite, from Proto-Germanic *mait- (cognates: Gothic maitan, Old High German meizen "to cut"), from PIE root *mai- "to cut" (see maim). Or else its original sense is "something small," and it is from PIE *mei- (2) "small," in reference to size (see minus).

mite

"little bit," mid-14c., from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German mite "tiny animal," from Proto-Germanic *miton-, from PIE *mei- (2) "small" (see minus), and thus probably identical with mite (n.1). Also the name of a medieval Flemish copper coin of very small value, proverbial in English for "a very small unit of money," hence used since Wyclif to translate Latin minutum from Vulgate in Mark xii:43, itself a translation of Greek lepton. French mite (14c.) is a loan-word from Dutch.

Wiktionary
mite

n. 1 A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc. See Acarina. 2 A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. 3 A lepton, a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ. 4 A small weight; one twentieth of a grain. 5 Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle. Sometimes used adverbially.

WordNet
mite
  1. n. a slight but appreciable addition; "this dish could use a touch of garlic" [syn: touch, hint, tinge, pinch, jot, speck, soupcon]

  2. any of numerous very small to minute arachnids often infesting animals or plants or stored foods

Wikipedia
Mite

Mites, along with ticks, are small arthropods belonging to the subclass Acari (also known as Acarina) and the class Arachnida. The scientific discipline devoted to the study of ticks and mites is called acarology. In soil ecosystems, mites are favored by high organic matter content and by moist conditions, wherein they actively engage in the fragmentation and mixing of organic matter.

Mite (Dungeons & Dragons)

In the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the mite is a type of creature.

Mite (disambiguation)

Mites are small arachnids in the subclass Acari.

Mite may also refer to:

  • Mite (Dungeons & Dragons), a character in the role-playing games
  • Mooney M-18 Mite, an aircraft
  • River Mite, a river in northern England

People:

  • Mite Cikarski, Macedonian footballer
  • Mite Kremnitz, German writer

MITE or MITES may refer to:

  • Mangalore Institute of Technology & Engineering
  • Minority Introduction to Engineering and Science

Usage examples of "mite".

In 1922 the United States had prohibited the import of foreign bees because they were bringing with them a tiny eight-legged tick called the Acarine mite.

She was right impressed to be serving a man of the cloth, which I was back in those days, and I converted the bejabbers out of her three or four times a day, which made my incarceration in durance vile a mite easier to take.

Lilliputian, a chit, a fingerling, a pigwidgeon, a mite, a dandiprat, a micromorph, an homunculus, a dapperling, a small fry or someone with bad posture, weighted down with the cares of the world?

Mum, learning at her knee about whelping and worming, infections, dysplasia, mites and ticks.

He was a mite of a boy, nothing but skin-covered bones, his burned, freckled face in a mortar of tears and dust, his clothing unspeakably dirty, one great toe in a festering mass from a broken nail, and sores all over the visible portions of the small body.

He just staggered a mite and then shook his haid and went red in the face.

Are you, or are you not, the Jason Goddard I sneaked off to Mite Hockey when you were too young to blow your own nose?

Victorian immune system, and of these, most were immunocules whose job was to drift around the dirty littoral of New Chusan using lidar to home in on any other mites that might disobey protocol.

Rob Lusk was a mite too big to punch out, but she was heating up to it.

Starling mites might bite you if you let starlings or mynas nest in your ceiling and the straw mite might if you are in contact with stored straw or grains.

New Guinea that lives symbiotically with dozens of plants, growing in the niches and clefts in its carapace, rooted all the way down to its flesh, plus a whole ecosystem of mites, rotifers, nematodes, and bacteria attached to the garden.

Sir, you nose very well that evere persun must luk furst at ome, and sartenly such anuther offar mite not have ever hapned, so as I shud ave bin justly to blam, had I not excepted of it when her lashipp was so veri kind as to offar to mak mee hur one uman without mi ever askin any such thing, to be sur shee is won of thee best ladis in thee wurld, and pepil who sase to the kontrari must bee veri wiket pepil in thare harts.

I have returned to discover them infected with tracheal and Varroa jacobsoni mites.

Miss Pixley wuz very well off though they lived in a little mite of a dark, low, lonesome house, with some tall Pollard willows in front of the door in a row, and jest acrost the road from a grave-yard.

But howsumever she never could take a mite of care of her children, they wuz brought up on wet nurses, and bottles, etc.