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Crossword clues for miso

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
miso

type of paste used in Japanese cooking, 1727, from Japanese.

Wiktionary
miso

n. a thick paste made by fermentation of soybeans with the mold (taxlink Aspergillus oryzae species noshow=1); used in making soups and sauces

Wikipedia
MISO (disambiguation)

MISO is Multiple Inputs, Single Output in system analysis.

MISO or Miso may also refer to:

  • Miso, a traditional Japanese seasoning
  • Master Input, Slave Output, a data line in the Serial Peripheral Interface Bus
  • Military information support operations, the U.S. military term for the function formally known as Psychological Operations
  • Midcontinent Independent System Operator, formerly known as Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator
  • Misophonia A Neurological/Hearing disorder characterized by fear or anxiety over certain sounds

Usage examples of "miso".

A smooth paste, miso is made from cooked soybeans, grains, salt, and a mold culture and then aged in cedar vats for one to three years.

In Asian countries, natto traditionally is served as a topping for rice, in miso soups, or stirred into vegetables.

Like miso, shoyu is made by combining cooked soybeans, a grain, and a mold culture in a salty brine for 12 to 18 months.

When ready to serve, remove 1 cup of broth from pot and stir into miso paste until smooth.

Return broth and miso paste to the pot, remove from heat and stir gently.

Japanese cultured food that also is used in making miso, shoyu, and sake, and in pickling.

Soft tofu is often used for salad dressings and in miso soup and quick-cooking dishes.

She lifted the lid, drank the miso soup, polished off slices of sweet grilled eel with a flash of chopsticks, and finished with a pickle and cold rice.

Near the tomb foreshortened vendors were selling roasted nuts, noodles wrapped in paper, tiny bundles of kif, seaweed, bowls of miso and kimshi, and babaku chicken with texasauce.

Beneath a faint touch of fruitiness like the aroma of a blossoming pear tree, I met in successive layers the tastes of black olives, aged Gouda cheese, pine needles, new leather, miso soup, either sorghum or brown sugar, burning peat, library paste, and myrtle leaves.

Kif sellers, peddlers of babaku chicken with texasauce, of miso, of combs and brushes, of incense.