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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Laker

Laker \Lak"er\, n. One that is connected with a lake or lakes, as in habitation, toil, etc.:

  1. One of the poets of the Lake school. See Lake poets, under Lake, n.

  2. (Zo["o]l.) A fish living in, or taken from, a lake, esp. the namaycush.

  3. A lake steamer or canal boat.

    The bridge tender . . . thought the Cowies ``a little mite'' longer than that laker.
    --The Century.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
laker

used of people or things associated in various ways with a lake or lakes, including tourists to the English Lake country (1798); the poets (Wordsworth, etc.) who settled in that region (1814); boats on the North American Great Lakes (1887), and a person whose work is on lakes (1838); see lake (n.1). The U.S. professional basketball team began 1947 as the Minneapolis Lakers, where the name was appropriate; before the 1960-1 season it moved to Los Angeles, but the name was kept.

Wiktionary
laker

Etymology 1 n. (context UK dialectal English) A player; an actor. Etymology 2

n. 1 (context nautical North America English) A ship used on the Great Lakes. 2 A wharfman who resides near a lake.

Usage examples of "laker".

Are there any symptoms of the gelatinous character of the effusions of the Lakers in the compositions of Homer?

At the beginning of this corridor, another hall jutted off to the rear and ended at a crossbarred wooden door as impres­sive as Laker Broome's.

At the beginning of this corridor, another hall jutted off to the rear and ended at a crossbarred wooden door as impressive as Laker Broome's.

I was almost totally ignorant about cars and listened stupefied as the others nodded knowingly while Marshall rambled on about torques, revs, gear ratios, mills, bores and strokes, overhead cams and rockers and tachs, and how it was really cool to rap your lakers in the parking lot of an A&amp.

When the visitors' lot outside Laker Broome's private entrance had filled, the parents had driven past it over the grass and parked their cars all along the yellow-green length of lawn which we often took as our way down to the Junior School for lunch.

I was almost totally ignorant about cars and listened stupefied as the others nodded knowingly while Marshall rambled on about torques, revs, gear ratios, mills, bores and strokes, overhead cams and rockers and tachs, and how it was really cool to rap your lakers in the parking lot of an A&W root beer stand.