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Crossword clues for inky

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
inky
adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
jet/inky black (=very dark)
▪ jet black hair
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ clouds of inky black smoke
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Inky

Inky \Ink"y\, a. Consisting of, or resembling, ink; soiled with ink; black. ``Inky blots.''
--Shak. ``Its inky blackness.''
--Boyle.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
inky

"as black as ink," 1590s, from ink (n.) + -y (2). Related: Inkily; inkiness.

Wiktionary
inky

a. 1 of the colour of ink, especially black ink; dark. 2 spattered or stained with ink

WordNet
inky
  1. adj. of the color of black ink [syn: ink-black, inky-black]

  2. [also: inkiest, inkier]

Wikipedia
Inky

Inky may refer to:

  • Inky (ghost), the blue ghost in the arcade game Pac-Man
  • Inky (liquid), to be stained with a liquid containing various pigments and/or dyes
  • Inky (police dog), who appeared on Softly Softly
  • Inky (email client), an email client by Arcode Corporation
  • A nickname for professional baseball player, Pete Incaviglia
  • A nickname for The Philadelphia Inquirer
  • More generally, slang for a Printer
Inky (police dog)

Inky was a police dog who appeared in the British police drama Softly, Softly: Taskforce during 1969-70. His handler was PC Snow, played by Terence Rigby. He is remembered for a minor stir he caused on British television.

The scriptwriter wanted to show something of the dangers police officers sometimes faced in their work, but thought it might upset the viewers if one of the characters was killed, so he wrote an episode where the police dog was shot and killed by a gunman. The episode was "Escort", the sixteenth and last in series 1 (transmitted 12 March 1970). Some viewers were upset by this episode, and shortly after Inky appeared on the children's programme Blue Peter to assure children who had seen the programme that he was all right.

Inky's replacement on the programme was Radar.

Inky (email client)

Inky is an email client for Microsoft Windows, Mac OS, iOS, and Android. Developed in 2008 by Arcode, Inc, based in Bethesda, Maryland, Inky was designed to be a simplistic email client that allows users to view all of their email accounts together on one screen. Inky works with any IMAP or POP account including Yahoo! Mail, AOL Mail, Gmail, and Windows Live Hotmail. Inky also has Microsoft Exchange connectivity. One of Inky's main features is its smart views and relevance sorting, which simplify the email process. Inky automatically organizes emails, and sorts social updates, daily deals, subscriptions and other non-critical messages into individual folders. In June 2013, Arcode released the latest version of Inky which includes updated smart views, account color and icon customization, as well as sender images. Inky also supports multiple accounts with separate personalization options for each account, as well as suggestions for additional email recipients based on frequently-mailed groups. In March 2014, Inky added letter-at-a-time search. Inky's email app for iPhone and iPad was selected for Gizmodo's Favorite Apps of the Week in June, 2014. In July, 2016, Inky began offering end-to-end encryption and digitally signed email.

Usage examples of "inky".

For weeks Claude worked hard at a study of some lightermen unloading a cargo of plaster, carrying white sacks on their shoulders, leaving a white pathway behind them, and bepowdered with white themselves, whilst hard by the coal removed from another barge had stained the waterside with a huge inky smear.

Swirling thunderheads shrouded a blood red moon and Bonhomme could see a flash of movement out of the corner of his eye in the inky darkness.

Smith had likely been an inky fourteen-year-old when Dingle had last seen him, and that not less than nine years before.

The mountains showed monstrous and shadowy: some dark inky blue, others in the west like walls and bastions of clotted mist against the hueless mist of heaven behind them.

I followed him into the hut, and with Nobs at our heels we passed through several chambers into a remote and windowless apartment where a small lamp sputtered in its unequal battle with the inky darkness.

Musquitoes, piums, and montucas never trouble the traveler on the inky stream.

When she came to the surface again it was to find herself as far from shore as she had been when she first quitted the prahu, but the craft was now circling far below her, and she set out once again to retrace her way toward the inky mass of shore line which loomed apparently near and yet, as she knew, was some considerable distance from her.

He laughed a low laugh of pleasure and relief, and then reaching out through the inky blackness he sought my shoulder and pulled my ear close to his mouth.

The demoness lay wrapped in shadows, her pale skin roiling and flowing with inky blackness while ebony flames of darkfire danced across her skin.

Following the meandering Dourbie, it ran snakily from patches of staring moonlight to patches of inky shadows, now on narrow ledges high over the brawling stream, now dipping so low that the tyres were almost level with the plane of broken waters.

A string of black vapor sprayed out of the base, billowing up around Nom Anor and Mif Kumas in cloud of inky miasma.

His chin bears a dull-blue tattoo which would strike terror to the hearts and loosen the strings of the bowels of the vilest ruffians in Rangoon, Lahore, Peshawar, Pernambuco, and Wei-hatta-hatta yet unhanged, save, of course, that it is almost always by virtue of dust, the inky goo of curried squid, and a hatred of water akin to hydrophobia, totally invisible.

Then a figure emerged from the inky blackness, wearing civilian clothes and waving his hands frantically in the air.

She blew him another kiss, then rode off into the inky blackness of the night, toward the light of the rising moon.

Mars had played the game of the cuttlefish, which, when pursued by its enemies, darkens the water behind it by a sudden outgush of inky fluid, and thus escapes the eye of its foe.