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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
fey
adjective
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ It needs to avoid being fey or quirky as it brings the contemporary design world further into its heart.
▪ Similarly, her often fey iconography suggests her interest in the supernatural.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Fey

Fey \Fey\ (f[=a]), a. [AS. f[=ae]ga, Icel. feigr, OHG. feigi.] Fated; doomed. [Old Eng. & Scot.]

Fey

Fey \Fey\ (f[=a]), n. [See Fay faith.] Faith. [Obs.]
--Chaucer.

Fey

Fey \Fey\, v. t. [Cf. Feague.] To cleanse; to clean out. [Obs.]
--Tusser.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
fey

"of excitement that presages death," from Old English fæge "doomed to die, fated, destines," also "timid, feeble;" and/or from Old Norse feigr, both from Proto-Germanic *faigjo- (cognates: Old Saxon fegi, Old Frisian fai, Middle Dutch vege, Middle High German veige "doomed," also "timid," German feige "cowardly"), from PIE *peig- (2) "evil-minded, hostile" (see foe). Preserved in Scottish. Sense of "displaying unearthly qualities" and "disordered in the mind (like one about to die)" led to modern ironic sense of "affected."

Wiktionary
fey

Etymology 1 a. 1 (context dialectal or archaic English) About to die; doomed; on the verge of sudden or violent death. 2 (context obsolete English) dying; dead. 3 (context chiefly Scottish English) possessing second sight, clairvoyance, or clairaudience 4 overrefined, affected Etymology 2

a. magical or fairylike. n. fairy folk collectively.

WordNet
fey
  1. adj. slightly insane [syn: touched(p)]

  2. suggestive of an elf in strangeness and otherworldliness; "thunderbolts quivered with elfin flares of heat lightning"; "the fey quality was there, the ability to see the moon at midday"- John Mason Brown [syn: elfin]

Wikipedia
Fey (singer)

María Fernanda Blázquez Gil (born July 21, 1973), known professionally as Fey, is a Latin Grammy Award-nominated Mexican pop artist that became a pop teen idol for Latin America in the mid-1990s.

Fey

Fey may refer to:

  • Fèy, a traditional vodou folk song in Haiti
  • Fey, Switzerland
  • Féy, Moselle, France
  • Fey (name), and persons with the name
  • Fey (singer) (born 1973), vocalist
    • Fey (album), a 1995 recording by the singer of the same name
  • Fey (Dungeons & Dragons), a fictional creature
  • an alternative word for fairy
Fey (Dungeons & Dragons)

In Dungeons & Dragons, Fey is a category of creatures (called a creature type in the game). The fey deities are associated with the Seelie Court and the Unseelie Court. Titania is the general fey deity, with individual races like the Killmoulis who worship Caoimhin. Fey are usually humanoid in form and generally have supernatural abilities and a connection to nature. The Sylph is one creature which has a Fae appearance, but is officially recognized as an outsider creature type.

The source material includes two templates for players who wish to have crossbred characters incorporating fey traits. The first is the Half Fey, a cross between a fey and a human or giant. Feytouched are one quarter fey, the result of a crossbreeding between a Half Fey and a human or giant. All feytouched have at least one feature or characteristic that is out of the norm, including vibrantly colored hair, feathered eyebrows, or a propensity for speaking in rhyme, for example, and are charismatic. The feytouched template appeared in the third edition Fiend Folio (2003).

Fèy

"Fèy" is a traditional Vodou folk song in Haiti. In Haitian Creole, "fèy" means "leaf", and the lyrics of the song describe a leaf falling from a tree. Like many traditional songs in Vodou folklore, the lyrics of "Fèy" can hold many meanings, both religious and political. At least two mizik rasin bands in the 1990s sang adaptations of the traditional song. A version first performed by RAM in 1992 was banned throughout Haiti during the remaining years of the Raoul Cédras military junta.

Fey (album)

Fey is the eponymous debut album of Mexican pop singer Fey. It was released in 1995 with the Sony Music Mexico label. The album has sold over 2 million worldwide.

Fey (name)

Fey is a German or Irish name found as both a given name and surname.

Usage examples of "fey".

It had always amazed me how many of the lesser fey women would allow Cel to abuse them in the most base manner possible, because if they got pregnant they would be members of the court.

Jenna was certain that she would call only whatever fey creatures Doire Coill held within its confines.

The kills of the fey were being divided when the abrupt return of the hand of relieving warriors for the kand surprised me.

He thought of his fey mage Jordy and wondered where the mage was now, and if he, Kyan Red-axe, and Isarns apprentice, Stanach, were still alive.

It was quite a change from his days as a Conscientious Neglector when he deliberately stayed away from all things fey and otherworldly.

Robin-goodfellow, the spoorne, the mare, the man in the oke, the hell-waine, the fier drake, the puckle, Tom Thombe, hobgoblins, Tom Tumbler, boneless, and such other bugs, that we were afraid of our own shadowes.

Over the years, she had heard many bards and minstrels tell tales of Morgen le Fey and her evil Val Sans Retour.

And with Morgen guiding the child, it would only be a matter of time before the fey bitch turned his babe against him.

The stone of the floor was unlittered with the stiff, yellow stall bedding, as though one had already been there to clear away the trailings of the fey previous, leaving my feet an easier path through the dwelling.

Thought you to make me dance attendance on a soft, unmuscled half-mortal mongrel fey?

But in an inner sense he always missed Mm, and he grew up warmthless and fey.

Deeply did the chill of the wind touch me, setting my bones ashiver, and bleak indeed was the fey I looked upon.

I worked the El Fey with Texas Guinan, and I was doing a little bootlegging on the side, for Owney.

I shook my head wearily, his failed daughter, his fey child, who had left her shoes in a corncrib to go dancing with the night.

A kilt, of course, a Hebridean girl without a kilt was unthinkable, a Shetland two-piece and brown brogues: and that she would be a raven-haired beauty with wild, green, fey eyes went without saying.