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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Dives

Dives \Di"ves\, n. [L., rich.] The name popularly given to the rich man in our Lord's parable of the ``Rich Man and Lazarus'' (
--Luke xvi. 19-31). Hence, a name for a rich worldling.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
Dives

traditional name for a rich man, late 14c., from Latin dives "rich (man);" see Dis. Used in Luke xvi in Vulgate and commonly mistaken as the proper name of the man in the parable. Related to divus "divine," and originally meaning "favored by the gods" (see divine (adj.)).

Wiktionary
dives

n. (plural of dive English) vb. (en-third-person singular of: dive)

Wikipedia
Dives

Dives may refer to:

  • Dives, Oise, a French commune of the Oise département
  • Dives River, a river in Normandy
  • Dives-sur-Mer, a commune in Normandy
  • Dives (genus), a genus of New World blackbirds
  • Dis Pater, Roman god of the underworld, contracted from Dives Pater ("Father of Riches")
  • Dives, 'the rich man' in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus
  • Marcus Licinius Crassus (c. 115–53 BC), a Roman politician, who was known as Dives, meaning "The Rich" or "Moneybags"
  • Chrysophylax Dives, "Goldward the Rich," the dragon in Farmer Giles of Ham
  • Lewis Dives, English Member of Parliament
  • SU Dives, a French association football club founded in 1929
Dives (river)

The Dives is a 105 km long river in the Pays d'Auge, Normandie, France. It flows into the English Channel in Cabourg.

The source of the Dives is near Exmes, in the Orne department. The Dives flows generally north through the following departments and towns:

  • Orne: Trun
  • Calvados: Morteaux-Coulibœuf, Saint-Pierre-sur-Dives, Troarn, Dives-sur-Mer, Cabourg

The Dives is officially navigable up to the bridge at Putot-en-Auge although height restrictions apply. No yachts or fishing boats navigate the Dives further than the Pont de la Dives linking Dives-sur-Mer to Cabourg, 1 km from the river's estuary on the English Channel.

The last kilometre of the Dives is a large meander encircling a man-made harbour and the holiday resort of Port Guillaume (William's harbour). The river is prevented from reaching the English Channel by a kilometre long sand dune called Le cap Cabourg.

The estuary of the Dives was the site of one of William the Conqueror's most decisive victories in the year 1057, over the combined armies of France and Anjou. Later, in 1066, Duke William assembled his army and fleet for the invasion of England at the same location as the earlier victory.

Dives (genus)

Dives is a genus of Neotropical birds in the family Icteridae. It contains three species:

  • Cuban blackbird, Dives atroviolacea
  • Melodious blackbird, Dives dives
  • Scrub blackbird, Dives warszewiczi

The melodious blackbird lives in Mexico and Central America; the scrub blackbird in Ecuador and Peru.

The three species look similar, with plumage ranging from brownish black in juveniles to black with iridescence (green, blue, or violet) in adults, slightly more iridescent in males. The bare parts are black and the eyes are dark brown. The upper edge of the bill (the culmen) is curved, not flattened as in many other icterids, and the bill has a slight hook at the tip. The songs are varied and pleasant. If the ranges of the melodious blackbird and the northern populations of the scrub blackbird overlapped, they would be indistinguishable in the field apart from voice, and some authorities lump these two species into one; on the other hand some split the scrub blackbird into two species.

All three live in open habitats, including agricultural land, and have adapted well to human disturbance.

This genus is believed to be most closely related to Euphagus and Quiscalus.

Usage examples of "dives".

There are very few harbours, and most of them are the mouths of rivers like the Dives, where the tides pour in and out and small ships can only go out on the ebb and come in again on the flood.

  The garrison there had already been overrun, even though in that attack only two of the assaulting gliders found the target (the third came down seven miles away on the wrong bridge—a crossing over the Dives River).

  Helplessly Morrissey watched the men being swept away toward the flooded Dives valley, gleaming in the moonlight off in the distance --the area the Germans had inundated as part of their defenses.

  The plan called for paratroopers to dominate the heights northeast of Caen, hold the bridges over the Orne and the Caen Canal, demolish five more on the Dives River and thus block enemy forces, particularly panzers, from driving into the side of the invasion bridgehead.

  Rommel’s antiparatroop precautions had paid off well: The waters and swamps of the flooded Dives valley were deathtraps.

  Some pilots, caught in heavy cloud, mistook the mouth of the Dives for that of the Orne and let men out over a maze of marshes and swamps.

  Between him and Varaville were not only the marshes but the Dives River itself.

He assembled them in the River Dives, not far to the east of Caen, and from there it is a hundred miles to Beachy Head and the same to the Isle of Wight.

The river Dives is in the Bay of the Seine, and to get out of the bay the fleet had to clear its eastern extremity, thirty miles away, which is Cap d'Antifer.

The course from the Dives to this headland, in modern terms, is 015° true, which is also precisely the course to Hastings.

In other words, when the fleet sailed out of the Dives, and for at least thirty miles beyond, the wind stood fair for England.

It is unthinkable that Duke William, after a month of waiting and praying for that very wind, sailed out of the Dives with any intention but to land in England.

It dives by filling ballast tanks with water and ascends by expelling the ballast.

Hell, I’ll bet we can get that gold out in two dives, three at the most.

Their dives had been superbly conducted—the French were unmatched at this sort of thing—and it could be argued that they didn’t loot the ship itself, bringing up objects only from the debris field that probably would be buried in a few years and lost forever.