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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
derogatory
adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a derogatory/pejorative term (=one that is insulting or disapproving)
▪ ‘Pinko’ is a derogatory term for someone with socialist ideas.
a disparaging/derogatory comment (=criticizing someone or something in an unpleasant way)
▪ Never make disparaging comments about a colleague’s work.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
remark
▪ The derogatory remark that the rounder handles might strike the bench leg is uncalled for.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I didn't like the way he made derogatory comments about his colleagues.
▪ I wish you wouldn't make derogatory remarks about members of my family.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But the picture she paints of women is nevertheless often a derogatory one.
▪ In this context, there is an important distinction to be drawn between imputations which are derogatory and imputations which are defamatory.
▪ Nothing derogatory intended, no insult taken.
▪ The derogatory remark that the rounder handles might strike the bench leg is uncalled for.
▪ The earthbound made derogatory jokes about empty cans, and turned their backs on the brash, glittering necklace of the night.
▪ There is nothing derogatory to the teacher intended in such a suggestion.
▪ They are also incredibly diverse; there is little justification for derogatory generalizations.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
derogatory

derogatory \de*rog"a*to*ry\, a. Tending to derogate, or lessen in value; expressing a low opinion; expressing derogation; detracting; injurious; -- with from, to, or unto.

Syn: belittling, depreciative, deprecatory, depreciatory, derogatory, detractive, detracting, slighting, pejorative, denigratory.

Acts of Parliament derogatory from the power of subsequent Parliaments bind not.
--Blackstone.

His language was severely censured by some of his brother peers as derogatory to their other.
--Macaulay.

Derogatory clause in a testament (Law), a sentence of secret character inserted by the testator alone, of which he reserves the knowledge to himself, with a condition that no will he may make thereafter shall be valid, unless this clause is inserted word for word; -- a precaution to guard against later wills extorted by violence, or obtained by suggestion. [1913 Webster] ||

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
derogatory

c.1500, from Late Latin derogatorius, from Latin derogatus, past participle of derogare "to take away, detract from, diminish," also "repeal partly, restrict, modify," from de- "away" (see de-) + rogare "ask, question, propose" (see rogation).

Wiktionary
derogatory

a. 1 (context usually with ''to'' English) Tending to derogate, or lessen in value of someone; expressing derogation; detracting; injurious. 2 (context legal English) When referring to a clause in a testament: a sentence of secret character inserted by the testator alone, of which he reserves the knowledge to himself, with a condition that no will he may make thereafter shall be valid, unless this clause is inserted word for word; – a precaution to guard against later wills extorted by violence, or obtained by suggestion. n. A trade-line on a credit report that includes negative credit history.

WordNet
derogatory

adj. expressive of low opinion; "derogatory comments"; "disparaging remarks about the new house" [syn: derogative, disparaging]

Usage examples of "derogatory".

Perhaps he was disturbed because gossipmongers often discussed him in derogatory terms.

  Bracket rub again, and Trag made a few derogatory comments on technicians who did not recognize that proper bracketing prolonged the life of crystal.

Bracket rub again, and Trag made a few derogatory comments on technicians who did not recognize that proper bracketing prolonged the life of crystal.

It was a derogatory term, suggesting something evil, and it had no clear, explicit definition.

The years rolled away from her, and she was once more the Dahlia Wooster of the old yoicks-and-tantivy days--the emotional, free-speaking girl who had so often risen in her stirrups to yell derogatory personalities at people who were heading hounds.

Though this resolution was derogatory to the majesty of the Greek empire, and offensive to its clergy, yet being then oppressed by the Turks, and fearing their inability for defense, in order to have a better ground for requesting assistance, they submitted.