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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Cran

Cran \Cran\ (kr[a^]n), Crane \Crane\ (kr[=a]n), n. [Scot., fr. Gael. crann.] A measure for fresh herrings, -- as many as will fill a barrel. [Scot.]
--H. Miller.

Wiktionary
cran

Etymology 1 alt. (context obsolete English) a measure of herrings, either imprecise or sometimes legally specified; also rarely a barrel made to hold such a measure n. (context obsolete English) a measure of herrings, either imprecise or sometimes legally specified; also rarely a barrel made to hold such a measure Etymology 2

n. (context music English) An embellishment played on the lowest note of a chanter of a bagpipe, consisting of a series of grace notes produced by rapid sequential lifting of the fingers of the lower hand.

WordNet
cran

n. a capacity unit used for measuring fresh herring

Wikipedia
Cran

Cran may refer to:

  • calorie restriction with adequate nutrition
  • CRAN (R programming language), the Comprehensive R Archive Network for the R programming language
  • Cran (unit), a measurement of uncleaned herring
  • Cranberry, a fruit
  • Cran, County Fermanagh, a townland in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland

People:

  • Chris Cran (born 1949), a Canadian painter
  • James Cran (born 1944), a British politician
Cran (unit)

A cran, in use from at least as early as the 18th century, was a unit of measure of landed uncleaned herring used in the North Sea fishing industry. In 1852 it was defined to be the equivalent of one standard box of about 37.5 imperial gallons - typically around 1200 fish, but varying anywhere between 700 and 2,500. In metric units it is about 170.5 liters.

Usage examples of "cran".

While this feat was performed with so much address that no disturbance was caused to the bystanders, amid loud cheers from the beholders gathered on the walls and towers of the fortress, the king rode upon the bridge, and had got about half way across it, when the lords of the council, headed by Cranmer, advanced to pay him homage.

These theoretical notions found a more solid basis in the Collectanea satis copiosa, put together from the opinions Cranmer had garnered in Europe.

At that time I was in communication with Major Bob Craner, one of the finest men I've ever known in my life.

As soon as they had made my body incapable of siring girlchildren, the Cranning call began.

Archbishop Cranmer conducted the ceremony, and trumpets sounded as three crowns were placed, one after the other, on the King's head, and a gold ring on his marriage finger.

The King, who was now in a hurry to marry Anne Boleyn, thought this such a good idea, that he sent for Cranmer, post haste, and said to LORD ROCHFORT, Anne Boleyn’.

Then you come down with a bang from all the splendour of the Prayer Book and the really super prose of Cranmer to what some chap thinks it would be good for you to hear.