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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
colloquial
adjective
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
colloquial expressions
▪ It's a useful little phrase book, full of colloquial expressions.
▪ The best way of improving your colloquial English is by listening to native speakers.
▪ You shouldn't use phrases like "sort of" in essays -- they're too colloquial.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ Although some students have a good grasp of colloquial language, few have ever got to grips with the concept of register.
▪ Catledge inserted the more rustic touches, a kind of hominy style that gave their writing a colloquial flavor.
▪ For an ordinary wedding a colloquial way of speaking will be suitable.
▪ The wire services demanded language stripped of the local, the regional, and the colloquial....
▪ There is a colloquial standard to learn on the playground and a literary standard to learn in class.
▪ There is also growing differentiation between colloquial and literal vocabulary.
▪ There is nothing colloquial about the auditor calling the company his/her client.
▪ This tale was collected in the Louisiana Creole colloquial speech.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Colloquial

Colloquial \Col*lo"qui*al\, a. [See Colloqui.] Pertaining to, or used in, conversation, esp. common and familiar conversation; conversational; hence, unstudied; informal; as, colloquial intercourse; colloquial phrases; a colloquial style. -- Col*lo"qui*al*ly, adv.

His [Johnson's] colloquial talents were, indeed, of the highest order.
--Macaulay.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
colloquial

1751, from colloquy "a conversation" + -al (1). Related: Colloquially.

Wiktionary
colloquial

a. 1 (context linguistics English) Denoting a manner of speaking or writing that is characteristic of familiar conversation; informal. 2 Of or pertaining to a conversation; conversational or chatty.

WordNet
colloquial

adj. characteristic of informal spoken language or conversation; "wrote her letters in a colloquial style"; "the broken syntax and casual enunciation of conversational English" [syn: conversational]

Usage examples of "colloquial".

So twenty-fourth century aliens in the Antares system would speak a colloquial Brooklynese, commanders of the Black Hole Explorer would long for their Ganymede Lady.

Library to use colloquial Anglic, hiring Kanten, Tymbrimi, and others as consultants.

I feel certain his work would shed light on the phonotactic differences between the scribal and colloquial writing systems in the Greece of that period.

The only difference was that someone had removed the boarding evidently meant to keep unwanted house hunters out, a someone who did not in tend to be put off by any would-be attempts to remove them if the graffiti scrawled across the doors and windows were anything to go by, Garth decided as he briefly read the colloquial message to the effect that uninvited visitors would not be welcome.

When I called upon Dr. Johnson next morning, I found him highly satisfied with his colloquial prowess the preceding evening.

Honourable Mr. Stables, which bids fair to outshine the old one, on which he has so long rested his colloquial reputation.

I put up with all his deficiences, because he dressed my hair to my taste, and his constant chattering offered me the opportunity of practising the colloquial French which cannot be acquired from books.

Like much else, the derivation of the colloquial name for any form of portable storage was lost in the mists of technological antiquity.

Engineering designs based on their equations resulted in the construction of the first Caplis generator, variations of which power all interstellar vessels by accelerating them to speeds that allow them to slip into the fifth dimension, more commonly known today by its colloquial designation, space-plus.

Ye powers that rule the tongue, if such there are, And make colloquial happiness your care, Preserve me from the thing I dread and hate, A duel in the form of a debate.

Eleria eventually came to realize that the language she had come to know as the language of poetry had a more colloquial form which they could use for everyday communication.

Nelson Coleridge, shows how pregnant, how pithy, how full of subtle observation, and often also of playful humour, could be the talk of the great discourser in its lighter and more colloquial forms.

Another junkie of the secret life, as Hyde had once described it to Aubrey, who had pursed his lips in disownment of the colloquial epithet.

Yet the theme was good, and timely, and heartfelt, and White preserves an awareness of persons and aerates the dialectics with traits of character and colloquial asides.

Indignation, the sense of moral insecurity engendered by such a treacherous proceeding joined to the immediate apprehension of a broken neck, would, in the colloquial phrase, put him in a state.