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Cho

Cho may refer to:

Chō

is a Japanese voice actor from Kōnosu, Saitama. His former stage name was . He is a graduate of the Nishogakusha University Department of Literature and received training at Bungakuza's research establishment and the Seinenza Theater Company before attaching himself to Production Baobab in 1986. He transferred to the Tokyo Actor's Consumer's Cooperative Society in 2007. On August 23, 2006, he changed his stage name to Chō after his character in Tanken Boku no Machi. His hobbies include badminton and jogging, and he is a licensed teacher in calligraphy.

Cho (Korean surname)

Cho or Jo is a Korean family name.

As of 2000, there were 1,347,730 people by this surname in South Korea, more than 2% of the total population. The name may represent either of the Hanja ( Chinese: Zhao) or (Chinese: Cao); the former is nearly three times more common.

Chō (song)

Chō is the 7th major single by female J-pop singer-songwriter Tsukiko Amano, from her third major album Tenryū. It was released on November 12, 2003, and reached a peak of #49 on the Oricon weekly charts, charting for 8 weeks. The song was used as the theme song of PlayStation 2 survival horror game Fatal Frame II: Crimson Butterfly. The lyrics of the song tie in with the main themes of the game, and the PV was shot using similar imagery to that seen in-game, including crimson CG butterflies, which can also be seen on the cover. The song was also included on Catalog, Amano's "best of" album.

"Chō" itself is filled with emotional vocals and is slow in tempo; following the tradition of her other singles, the B-side is a parody of the titular song and has more of a "pop" feel.

Usage examples of "cho".

Now she was distracted, because the Cat did not approve of this place for some reason, and so Cho had never seen the rock garden close up.

Endurance was waiting impatiently, but the years flew by and Cho remained a child.

The Controller had been told long ago to match development time to demand: when it had come to Cho it had been on a slow, slow schedule.

The discomfort did not worry the Cat, and Cho had never known anything better so she did not suffer, but eventually there was bound to be trouble.

She found Cho this time at her second home, her favourite boulder overlooking the wilderness.

She listened with big round eyes to the story of the brave Emperor who saved the baby from the medicine, and the wicked Empress who killed him before he could save Cho as well.

When they had come down the first slopes and were out on the level ground in the wilderness Cho looked back.

They stopped their mindless trudging and began to appreciate their surroundings: there was blue sky, which Cho had never seen before.

She introduced Cho to sunset watching, and the art of appreciating a warm stone or a cool shadow, and she told her interesting stories of the Empresses and Emperors she had known.

She found this hole business quite delightful, but Cho thought it no more than mildly pleasant.

For a moment Cho thought she was going to see something stupendous, but the heads approached the far side of the inlet and separated, shouldering water aside, producing long legs, glistening backs and trailing tails.

She knew what Cho was feeling: lazy feelings that there was nothing more but to wait to be fetched.

One of these thirty-four would be the ideal companion, to guide Cho and the Cat into the world and make them look just like everyone else.

The Cat had made Cho lay a trap on the path, made of the unknotted fishing net.

For a while Cho was continually expecting the wonderful road to appear, and then the people round the next corner.