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The Collaborative International Dictionary
Bel

Bel \Bel\, n. The Babylonian name of the god known among the Hebrews as Baal. See Baal.
--Baruch vi. 41.

Bel

Bel \Bel\ (b[e^]l), n. [Hind., fr. Skr. bilva.] A thorny rutaceous tree ( [AE]gle marmelos) of India, and its aromatic, orange-like fruit; -- called also Bengal quince, golden apple, wood apple. The fruit is used medicinally, and the rind yields a perfume and a yellow dye.

Bel

Bel \Bel\ (b[e^]l), n. [from Alexander Graham Bell.] a unit of sound intensity equal to ten decibels.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
Bel

heaven-and-earth god of Babylonian religion, from Akkadian Belu, literally "lord, owner, master," cognate with Hebrew ba'al.

bel

unit of power level in measuring sound, 1929, named for Scottish-born telephone pioneer Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922).

bel

"beautiful," early 14c., from Old French bel, belle "beautiful, fair, fine" (see belle). "Naturalized in ME.; but after 1600 consciously French" [OED].

Wiktionary
bel

Etymology 1 n. A measure of relative power, defined as log10(P 1/P 2), where P1 and P2 are the measured and reference power respectively. See also decibel. Etymology 2

n. (alt form bael English) (qualifier Indian tree English)

WordNet
bel
  1. n. a logarithmic unit of sound intensity equal to 10 decibels [syn: B]

  2. Babylonian god of the earth; one of the supreme triad including Anu and Ea; earlier identified with En-lil

Gazetteer
Bel-Ridge, MO -- U.S. village in Missouri
Population (2000): 3082
Housing Units (2000): 1288
Land area (2000): 0.811259 sq. miles (2.101151 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.811259 sq. miles (2.101151 sq. km)
FIPS code: 04366
Located within: Missouri (MO), FIPS 29
Location: 38.714868 N, 90.328081 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bel-Ridge, MO
Bel-Ridge
Bel, MO
Bel
Bel-Nor, MO -- U.S. village in Missouri
Population (2000): 1598
Housing Units (2000): 689
Land area (2000): 0.625315 sq. miles (1.619558 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.625315 sq. miles (1.619558 sq. km)
FIPS code: 04348
Located within: Missouri (MO), FIPS 29
Location: 38.704001 N, 90.317353 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Bel-Nor, MO
Bel-Nor
Bel, MO
Bel
Wikipedia
BEL

BEL can be an abbreviation for:

  • The ISO 3166-1 alpha-3 country code for Belgium
  • BEL or bell character in the C0 control code set
  • Belarusian language, in the ISO 639-2 and SIL country code lists
  • Bharat Electronics Limited
  • Bellingham (Amtrak station), Washington, United States; Amtrak station code BEL
  • Behind Enemy Lines (disambiguation)
  • Val de Cães International Airport 3-letter IATA airport code in Belém, Brazil
  • The ICAO code for Brussels Airlines, a Belgian airline.
  • Biological Expression Language
Bel (mythology)

Bel (; from Akkadianbēlu), signifying "lord" or "master", is a title rather than a genuine name, applied to various gods in the Mesopotamian religion of Akkad, Assyria and Babylonia. The feminine form is Belit 'Lady, Mistress'. Bel is represented in Greek as Belos and in Latin as Belus. Linguistically Bel is an East Semitic form cognate with Northwest Semitic Baal with the same meaning.

Early translators of Akkadian believed that the ideogram for the god called in Sumerian Enlil was to be read as Bel in Akkadian. This is now known to be incorrect; but one finds Bel used in referring to Enlil in older translations and discussions.

Bel became especially used of the Babylonian god Marduk and when found in Assyrian and neo-Babylonian personal names or mentioned in inscriptions in a Mesopotamian context it can usually be taken as referring to Marduk and no other god. Similarly Belit without some disambiguation mostly refers to Bel Marduk's spouse Sarpanit. However Marduk's mother, the Sumerian goddess called Ninhursag, Damkina, Ninmah and other names in Sumerian, was often known as Belit-ili 'Lady of the Gods' in Akkadian.

Of course other gods called "Lord" could be and sometimes were identified totally or in part with Bel Marduk. The god Malak-bel of Palmyra is an example, though in the later period from which most of our information comes he seems to have become very much a sun god.

Similarly Zeus Belus mentioned by Sanchuniathon as born to Cronus/ El in Peraea is certainly most unlikely to be Marduk.

Bel was believed to be a patriarch from Armenia, somehow related to Hayk (the supreme God for ancient armenians) - the story tells they were brothers, but they may probably have been cousins. According to the myth, Hayk and Bel were both patriarchs of their own tribes, competing for supremacy. Hayk beat Bel, so the latter chose to go south to Babylon, and established himself there, became powerful again and lead his forces to avenge his previous defeat against Hayk. Somewhere near Van, the ancient capital of urartian Armenia, a final battle took place between the siblings. Hayk beat Bel with an arrow, and thus became the sole leader. He unified the tribes, that altogether took the name Armenia (in armenian, Hayastan, after Hayk).

Bel (name)

Bel is both a surname and a given name. Notable people with the name include:

  • Clyde F. Bel, Jr. (c. 1932 – 2014), American politician
  • Eógan Bél (died 542), a king of Connacht (in what is now Ireland)
  • Jean Le Bel (c. 1290 – 1370), medieval Flemish chronicler
  • Joseph Achille Le Bel (1847–1930), French chemist
  • Matthias Bel (1684–1749), Hungarian scholar, polymath and Lutheran pastor
  • Jules Bel (1842-1904), French cheese maker
  • Bel Kaufman (1911–2014), American teacher and author, best known for writing the novel Up the Down Staircase
  • Bel Mooney (born 1946), English journalist and broadcaster
  • Bel Powley, British actress

Fictional characters:

  • Bel Arvardan, in Isaac Asimov's novel Pebble in the Sky
  • Bel Riose, in Isaac Asimov's Foundation series
  • Bel (Dungeons & Dragons), lord of the first of The Nine Hells, in Dungeons and Dragons games

Usage examples of "bel".

Garm Bel Iblis had turned on the invaders like a cornered wampa, and Fleet Group Two was accelerating through the refugee screen to meet the enemy head-on.

He wondered briefly how the Black One had known that Bel Adad, the Patesi of Borsippa and Maqam Nifl, would send a message this important by-a mere human.

I have observed how Bel Adad, our very own Patesi, plays all ends against the middle and hopes the three will destroy each other to leave him the victor.

Serpent, that I have discovered a way to power vaster than anything Bel Adad, the pitiful Patter of Maqam Nifl and Borsippa, can wield!

Once back in the city of Bel Adad, the truly dangerous part of their quest began.

Black One had known that Bel Adad, the Patesi of Borsippa and Maqam Nifl, would send a message this important by a mere human.

Bel, the present duchess of Hawkscliffe, considered one of the most ravishing women in Society, wore a gown of soft rose silk with long sleeves of transparent aerophane crepe.

Il pianto innondava ancora il bel volto della mia diletta a queste ultime parole.

And in nearby Arneis, which bordered Aubinas in the south, along the Bel Awl Ridge, there was further reBellion brewing.

Bel diving over the intervening Betan and landing on him in a smothering clutch.

Though they dropped in their tracks from sheer exhaustion, he allowed them but an hour of sleep before he gave the signal for the rahla, for the sheik of the fendy el-Guad was filled with an ever increasing fear that the treasure and the woman would be taken away from him before he could reach the sandy wastes of his own barren beled.

A wave of homesickness swept over him, making it hard to breathe for memories of Tam, and Egwene, and the Winespring Inn, and Bel Tine on the Green in happier days.

Le monache potevan stare allegre che un bel liberatore ce lo avevano alla porta e potevano star allegri anche i birri, che avevano acquistato in me un famoso compagno.

Lord Pyt, who listened silently as Paquin Bel repeated himself, word for word, Arneth noted with wonder.

Rundel and Lennink, bridging the river Walda at Waldrach and the Finger River at Rusma, and then push through the gap of Bel Awl, and they were home.