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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
amends
noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ VERB
make
▪ Both missed with other attempts before Stephens made amends in the second half, landing another three penalties and kicking three conversions.
▪ Kids should be taught to make amends for their own mistakes.
▪ But the best way of making amends is to substitute for old habits new, and better, ones.
▪ Since that time, Feinstein said she has tried to make amends with her longtime political ally and friend.
▪ Others include the cathartic process of making amends to the people you have hurt through your addiction.
▪ What could he do to make amends?
▪ And I wished to make amends a little.
▪ Zacchaeus made a public confession of his past and declared he was ready to make amends.
try
▪ Perhaps now that he is dead we should try to make amends.
▪ Since that time, Feinstein said she has tried to make amends with her longtime political ally and friend.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ After his death, the scientific community made amends for their initial disrespect by naming the metric unit of energy after him.
▪ Bayezid subsequently made amends by building a mosque in front of his palace and appointed a place for himself therein.
▪ Both missed with other attempts before Stephens made amends in the second half, landing another three penalties and kicking three conversions.
▪ Pac Bell has sought to make amends with the Stinsons by agreeing to pay their cellular phone bill.
▪ Since that time, Feinstein said she has tried to make amends with her longtime political ally and friend.
▪ We want to make amends to them.
▪ When they break a window playing ball or lose something that belongs to a friend, they should make amends.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
Amends

Amends \A*mends"\, n. sing. & pl. [F. amendes, pl. of amende. Cf. Amende.] Compensation for a loss or injury; recompense; reparation. [Now const. with sing. verb.] ``An honorable amends.''
--Addison.

Yet thus far fortune maketh us amends.
--Shak.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
amends

early 14c., "restitution," collective singular, from Old French amendes "fine, penalty," plural of amende "reparation," from amender "to amend" (see amend).

Wiktionary
amends

n. Compensation for a loss or injury; recompense; reparation. vb. (en-third-person singular of: amend)

WordNet
amends
  1. n. a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury [syn: damages, indemnity, indemnification, restitution, redress]

  2. something done or paid in expiation of a wrong; "how can I make amends" [syn: reparation]

Wikipedia
Amends

"Amends" is episode 10 of season three of the television show Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Amends (Law & Order: Criminal Intent)

"Amends" is a seventh season episode of the television seriesLaw & Order: Criminal Intent. This is the first original episode to air on the USA Network.

Usage examples of "amends".

Then the cure, finding himself thus amerced in fines and amends, said to the judge.

And he insisted on making amends for his imposture the day before an imposture, he pointed out, that had singularly failed due to their collective skills by ordering bumpers of arrack punch.

For if any of the commoners were to make avowry for beasts taken in the common pasture it would then follow that if the Inquest were to pass against the plaintiff, he who avowed the taking in the common pasture would have the return of the beasts and the amends, and not the lord of the pasture, and that would be improper.

He was grateful for her forgiveness, and made amends by acceding to her wishes in regard to mixing with people he found uncongenial and visiting places which held no interest for him, such as dining with Madame de Brocages and running from church to church.

But though the king, by detaining James in the English court, had shown himself somewhat deficient in generosity, he made ample amends by giving that prince an excellent education, which afterwards qualified him, when he mounted the throne, to reform in some measure the rude and barbarous manners of his native country.

It is tempting to conclude that there was an element of remorse and even guilt in this charity - perhaps an attempt to make amends to the enserfed ranks of people from which Praskovya came.

Europe know of the amends I owe to the greatest genius our continent has produced.

She told me I had insulted her grievously, and that unless I made amends I should feel her vengeance.

Bragadin, to whom I told the whole story begging him to press for some signal amends.

I made a lively representation to him of all the grounds on which my landlady required proportionate amends to be made, since the laws guaranteed the peace of all law-abiding people.