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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

set

I.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a bunch/set of keys (=a group of keys kept together)
▪ He took out a huge bunch of keys and unlocked the door.
a chess set (=a complete group of the different chess pieces)
▪ She gave him a beautifully carved wooden chess set.
a fixed/set period (=that will not be changed)
▪ A tourist visa allows you to stay for a fixed period.
a flat/fixed/set fee (=a fee that is the same in every case)
▪ You pay a flat fee for all the services that are provided.
a list/set of priorities
▪ Marriage isn’t very high on my list of priorities.
a set of aims
▪ The organization has a set of aims which are listed on its website.
a set of conventions
▪ In the East you will have to learn a different set of conventions.
a set of criteria
▪ Doctors use an established set of criteria for making a diagnosis.
a set of cups
▪ a set of beautiful blue coffee cups
a set of data (=one group of data)
▪ The three sets of data produced strikingly different results.
a set of values
▪ The young have a completely different set of values.
a set/combination of circumstances
▪ This was a very unusual set of circumstances.
a set/fixed menu (=when the cook decides which dishes will be served to you, rather than you choosing for yourself)
▪ Dinner is three courses from a set menu.
a set/fixed pattern (=one that does not change)
▪ These incidents followed a set pattern.
a string/series/set of coincidences
▪ The accident happened because of a string of unfortunate coincidences.
appoint/set up/form a committee
▪ The council appointed a special committee to study the issue.
be dead (set) against sth (=completely disapprove of or disagree with something)
▪ I’d like to be an actress but Mum and Dad are dead set against it.
be dead set on sth (=be determined to do something)
▪ At the moment, Steve’s just dead set on winning the gold medal.
be set out in detail (=be written down and described in detail)
▪ The changes to the system are set out in detail in the next paragraph.
boxed set
▪ a boxed set of CDs
chemistry set
dial...set to
▪ The dial on the heater was set to ‘HOT’.
establish/form/set up a council
▪ A National Radio and Television Council was established to regulate the market.
idyllic setting/surroundings/scene etc
▪ If you want old-world tradition in an idyllic setting, this is the hotel for you.
impose/set/put a ceiling (on sth)
▪ The government imposed a ceiling on imports of foreign cars.
intimate setting
▪ The collection has been moved from its intimate setting to the British Museum.
jet set
launch/set up an inquiry (=start it)
▪ Police launched an inquiry yesterday after a man was killed by a patrol car.
lay down/set/impose conditions (=say what sb must agree to)
▪ They laid down certain conditions before agreeing to the ceasefire.
lay/set a trap (for sb)
▪ Mr Smith has walked straight into a trap laid by the Tories.
panic sets in (=starts)
▪ Before panic could set in, she realised that the clock was fast.
place setting
place/set sth in context (=consider something in context)
▪ The issue must be placed within its historical context.
set a clock (=make it say the right time)
▪ Don't forget to set your clocks to summer time.
set a compass (=adjust it so that the needle and the north mark are in line with each other)
▪ Wait until the needle settles, then set the compass.
set a deadline (=decide on a date when something must be finished)
▪ The deadline has been set at January 31st.
set a limit (also impose a limitformal)
▪ Set a time limit for the completion of the task.
set a question (=invent a question for a test)
▪ He used to set the questions for a TV quiz show.
set a quota (=say how much it is)
▪ They have the right to set fishing quotas.
set a record (=achieve it for the first time)
▪ The twenty-year-old set a new British record of 44.47 secs.
set a target
▪ The company has set ambitious business targets.
set ablaze (=made to burn)
▪ The factory had been set ablaze.
set afire
▪ One of the boats had been set afire.
set alight
▪ The car was set alight and pushed over a hill.
set an agenda (=decide on the problems you want to deal with)
▪ The new government set an agenda for constitutional reform.
set an example (=show by your own behaviour how other people should behave)
▪ You should be setting an example for your little brother.
set an objective (=decide what you are trying to achieve)
▪ Pupils should be encouraged to set their own objectives.
set aside
▪ One of the rooms was set aside for a yoga class.
set aside
▪ Try to set aside a few hours a week for exercise.
set bail (=say how much someone must pay to be allowed to stay out of prison)
▪ Judge Philip Moscone set bail at $2 million.
set fire to sth/set sth on fire (=make something start burning)
▪ A candle fell over, setting fire to the curtains.
set fire to sth/set sth on fire (=make something start burning)
▪ A candle fell over, setting fire to the curtains.
set of prints
▪ Why don’t you order an extra set of prints?
set off a bomb (also detonate a bombformal) (= make a bomb explode)
▪ The area was cleared and the police safely detonated the bomb.
set off on a journey (also embark on a journeyformal) (= start a long journey)
▪ Before setting off on a journey, look at maps and guidebooks.
set off on an expedition (also embark on an expeditionformal) (= leave at the start of an expedition)
▪ Trent set off on an expedition to collect plants with fellow botanical students.
set off...fire alarm
▪ Someone set off the fire alarm.
set off/trigger an explosion (=cause an explosion)
▪ Investigators believe a fuel leak may have triggered the explosion.
set off/trigger/activate the alarm (=make it start ringing)
▪ A window blew open, setting off the alarm.
set out the aims of sth
▪ Is there a set of guidelines setting out the aims of study?
set piece
▪ The trial scene is a classic set piece.
set priorities (=decide what the priorities are)
▪ With any new project, it's important to set priorities.
set square
set text (=one that must be studied for an examination)
▪ ‘Hamlet’ is a set text this year.
set the alarm (=make it ready to operate)
▪ Did you set the burglar alarm?
set the margins (=make them a particular size)
▪ Set the margins to have one inch on each side.
set the wheels in motion (=started the process)
▪ Once the house had been sold, Jane set the wheels in motion to find somewhere smaller to live.
set to/get to/get down to work (=start work)
▪ They set to work cutting down trees and brushwood.
set up a camera (=make a camera ready to use)
▪ The team set up their cameras some distance from the animals.
set up a project (=organize it)
▪ $30 million would be required to set up the project.
set up camp (=put up your tents and arrange the camping place)
▪ The soldiers set up camp outside the city.
set up roadblocks
▪ The police have set up roadblocks to try and catch the two men.
set up/establish a fund
▪ They have set up a fund to build a memorial to all those who died.
set up/establish a working group (to do sth)
▪ The commission has set up a special working group to look at the problem.
set up/establish/create a commission
▪ They set up a commission to investigate the problem of youth crime.
set up/establish/create a zone
▪ The government intends to set up an enterprise zone in the region.
set up/start up in business
▪ The bank gave me a loan to help me set up in business.
set up/start/form a company
▪ Two years later he started his own software company.
set your watch (=make it show the correct time)
▪ I set my watch by the clock on the mantelpiece.
set (yourself/sb) a goal (=decide what you or someone else should try to achieve)
▪ It helps if you set yourself clear goals.
set/break/beat a world record
▪ He set a new world record for the marathon.
set/establish a precedent
▪ The decision is important as it could set a legal precedent for other similar cases.
set/fix a date (=decide the date when something will happen)
▪ They haven’t set a date for the election yet.
set...free
▪ They have called on the government to set all political prisoners free.
set/give sb a task
▪ I was given the task of writing the chairman's speech.
set/lay down a standard
▪ The government sets standards that all hospitals must reach.
set/lay the table (=put knives, forks etc on a table before a meal)
▪ The table was set for fourteen.
setting aside
▪ I’ve been setting aside a few pounds each week.
setting off fireworks
▪ Jeff and David were in the back yard setting off fireworks.
set...trap
▪ The only way to catch mice is to set a trap.
shampoo and set (=when someone washes your hair and then dries it so that it has a particular style, especially using curlers)
start/set up a business
▪ When you’re starting a business, you have to work longer hours.
swing set
the moon sets (=goes down so that you cannot see it)
▪ The moon had set, but the sky was clear.
the rising/setting sun (=the sun as it appears/disappears)
▪ The fields were ablaze with light from the setting sun.
the rot set inBritish English (= a situation started to get worse)
▪ It was after he left the company that the rot set in.
the sun sets/goes down (=disappears at the end of the day)
▪ It is a good place to sit and watch the sun go down.
train set
turn/let/set sth loose (=let something go free)
▪ Don’t let your dog loose on the beach.
TV set
▪ a new TV set.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
about
▪ Eagerly I set about to free it from its rubble prison.
▪ Police then evacuated the basement mailroom while they set about disarming the device.
▪ Because of this discomfort he set about developing an air-cushioned sole with his engineer friend Herbert Funck.
▪ Amelia, her finances considerably reduced, saw an opportunity and set about getting her Kinner.
▪ But we don't know how to set about it.
▪ Taylor set about designing one for Midvale.
▪ They set about spreading their memories of the books.
▪ When Physioc refused to sell his property, the government condemned it and set about to take it under eminent domain laws.
aside
▪ He found that 600 cartons had been set aside ready for him.
▪ Drain Brussels sprouts and set aside to cool.
▪ Four aides-de-camp were appointed and apartments in the Tuileries were set aside for bedroom, study and play room.
▪ Remove leeks and oysters from skillet and set aside.
▪ Although a lot of space may not be available, a small area set aside for dining is always useful.
▪ Set aside for 1 to 2 hours at room temperature to give the flavors time to blend.
▪ Transfer the chicken to a plate and set aside.
down
▪ At Hilton, Bollenbach appears to be setting down some roots.
▪ But the local charters at least set down these requirements publicly and unequivocally for the patient.
▪ The events that followed, as set down by the Great Farini himself, formed the perfect melodrama.
▪ Pepita set down among the crates to wait for her friend and the rum to reach her.
▪ This caution will lead the writer to limit the number of questions set down in some realistic way.
▪ But, set down in the Globe, the production is simply visiting exotica.
▪ The time for serving a hearsay notice set by Ord 38, r21 is 21 days from setting down.
forth
▪ The norms of domestic life it set forth drew a clear ideological boundary between rational members of society and the feckless.
▪ Thy to understand which of the dimensions of performance set forth in the chart on page 90 are most critical.
▪ The goals and activities in this plan are consistent with the goals set forth in recently proposed plans for health care reform.
▪ After a sleepless night Stavrogin sets forth.
▪ The following table sets forth the information for each series of Notes to which the offers apply.
▪ So on this occasion when the priest set forth this ancient cry, it was as if a sleeping volcano erupted.
▪ Taylor set forth his Scientific Management theories at the turn of the century.
in
▪ When hungry times set in, the scouts become less fastidious and give lengthy dances even for poor food.
▪ Disillusionment sets in, of course, and back he comes.
In particular, unsteadiness may set in at much lower Ra than it would in their absence.
▪ But reality soon set in, both for the car makers and the government.
▪ But these days a general amnesia has set in, and it is almost impossible to meet anyone who believed in apartheid.
▪ The tide was setting in and the thing came nearer and nearer until she knew it was a dead body.
▪ And once decline has set in, it is hard to reverse.
▪ After every failure there is a good chance that depression will set in.
off
▪ But presently the crowd loosened into smaller groups and a good many people went off into the village or set off for outlying farms.
▪ Then the gate creaked, setting off a drumroll in his heart.
▪ Tying pillows to their heads with towels to protect themselves from the larger falling lumps, they set off.
▪ Since we had to be on the ship by nightfall, we set off from there in the gray chilly afternoon.
▪ I set off, threw myself to the ground and proceeded to roll three times.
▪ Investigators said they received information that Berry set off the bomb himself.
▪ Social security benefits will be set off against your loss; the relevant rules are contained in detailed regulations.
▪ In addition, a wintry spell before the Cesarewitch was prompting our runners to start donning their winter coats before they set off.
out
▪ Neither can the Six be said to have achieved all that they set out to do.
▪ Mirdza is busy supervising the setting out of desserts and slicing a beautifully decorated mocha and almond torte.
▪ Its founders were clinging to the wreckage, not setting out on a brave new voyage.
▪ Mr McCoo would be mixing clay and setting out the watercolor cases.
▪ My dybbuk set out to drive me crazy, and she damned near did.
▪ I never set out to be the biggest.
▪ The facts are set out in the judgment.
▪ Technical limitations are those that affect our ability to do what we set out to do.
up
▪ The family are setting up a charity trust to help other people facing similar difficulties.
▪ Zeus then sets up the kidnapping.
▪ Jennifer set up the Rummoli mat and divided up the colored poker chips while Bryan shuffled the cards.
▪ He set up a powerful board of directors to represent a cross section of business, political and public sector interests.
▪ The term is used to describe grace periods that often go into effect when new geographic area codes are set up.
▪ We will have to arrange for advance publicity, set up an office and make arrangements to show prospective buyers around.
■ NOUN
agenda
▪ Both men believe they are best-placed to set the agenda for Langbaurgh in the Nineties.
▪ Brown successfully set the agenda in 1993 with an innovative summit on the economy held early in the year in Los Angeles.
▪ For the first time since he became leader, he is in the position to set the political agenda.
▪ Braun promptly had a meeting with his players and set the agenda.
▪ In other words, governments, which formally at least set the political agenda, have relatively limited lifespans.
▪ Where business barged in and tried to set the agenda and the schools participated on a begrudging basis, problems inevitably arose.
▪ It can also help to set the debate agenda if it is strategically planned.
▪ Since then, the middle class has set the political agenda and put the old-style politicians and generals on the defensive.
business
▪ After finishing his apprenticeship he set up a business with this uncle, but it failed.
▪ In setting up your own business, you quickly discover the importance of that famous litany: location, location, location.
▪ It will also have learned a few lessons in how not to go about setting up a business.
▪ The rates will be set on the fifth business day of each month.
▪ Advice and guidance is provided in setting up the business and thereafter should any problems arise.
▪ We are particularly looking for entrepreneurs who can set up and develop businesses, thus creating employment in the area.
▪ Soon he sets up a little business, Walter's Christmas Store.
commission
▪ In June 1880, the prime minister set up a special commission to look into the park proposal.
▪ In January 1877, Congress set up an electoral commission to decide the dispute.
▪ The government met in emergency session on May 22 and agreed to set up a commission of inquiry to investigate the assassination.
▪ They could have published a White Paper or set up a commission of inquiry.
▪ The two agreed to set up a joint commission examining the issue.
▪ But he said the union was concerned at the delay in setting up a Staff Commission.
committee
▪ The Minister's response was to set up a coordinating committee of the nationalised fuel industry chairmen.
▪ The Democrats set up a committee to fire them and bring in Democrats, and Daley took part in the gleeful task.
▪ Jigawa, Kebbi, Yobe and Sokoto states have also set up committees to study the feasibility of sharia.
▪ One of its first actions on taking power in March was to set up a committee to review the project.
▪ Having spent the past two or three years setting up their committees, they are reluctant to unravel them now.
▪ Some companies, such as Universal, have set up lyric committees to prevent the release of offensive material.
date
▪ The administration has 30 days to set a date for talks.
▪ We set a date for the following May and started making plans.
▪ Once the revised time schedule is established, the proposal writer should set his dates of completion for each task.
▪ Thompson refused to set a projected end date for the inquiry or an opening date for any hearings.
▪ A round table might set an early date for new parliamentary elections.
▪ Once the Bartley team concurred, Christoffers telephoned to set a date for the copying.
example
▪ He may have been off colour in the World Cup, but he had set a fine example to others.
▪ The best way is to set a good example.
▪ They set a marvellous example indeed.
▪ He was a veteran who would set an example for the youngsters.
▪ This is because the greatest melody-writers belong to past epochs and set an example which modern composers can hardly match.
▪ He can set an example, just like I can, about what it means to be a professional player.
▪ Educating young people to drink responsibly and in moderation is best achieved by parents setting a good example.
▪ The government itself set an example last week by reducing its official work week from 38 to 36 hours.
fire
▪ Tommy set fire to some of Donald's hair by mistake.
▪ He was beaten, set on fire, and cast into the River Enns with a rock tied to him.
▪ They said we might set fire to it.
▪ I won't murder you tonight, unless perhaps I set the house on fire.
▪ She was set on fire by a shell exploding among the cotton with which her engines were protected.
▪ What a joke-a Gypsy setting fire to the forest.
▪ Then they set the church on fire and gunned down those who tried to escape.
fund
▪ Instead, the government and insurers agreed to set up a special fund.
▪ In 1985, the Army set up a college fund with a four-year value of $ 25, 200, Vollrath said.
▪ So they set up this fund to compensate victims in serious cases of abuse.
▪ A company sets up a trust fund into which it contributes new shares of stock or money to buy existing shares.
▪ The money would be used to set up endowment funds for individual universities.
▪ The proposition sets aside funds to expand research into which health services and procedures are effective.
▪ But as yet it has not approved a timetable or set aside funds for construction.
▪ Simpson has set up pension funds through his own companies worth $ 4. 1 million.
goal
▪ But Francis has replied by setting himself a new goal - carrying on past 40.
▪ When I set a goal, I stick to it.
▪ Many people who try to set themselves goals and call them objectives think they have failed when they don't reach them.
▪ We would never make the Diamond level because we had not set that goal for ourselves.
▪ At first the investment required seems finite and a goal can be set.
▪ But Mrs Harris said I must set a goal for myself.
▪ Sam Reed scored twice and then set up the third goal for Tom Cox.
▪ It helped low-income and underachieving high school students set career and academic goals and work to attain them.
heart
▪ On the back of this publicity, a range of young artists arose, set to conquer our hearts and minds.
▪ He was not a man to give way easily and he had clearly set his heart on making her recognise her father.
▪ Thoughts of the night that had just passed set her heart pounding and the blood rushing to her face.
▪ It fell with a crash which rattled her composure and set her heart thudding.
▪ The desire to reform, to set the human heart in harmony with principles of virtue produced moral plays.
▪ So now, after all, there was something she had set her heart on.
▪ The thought of running to catch a bus may be enough to set your heart racing.
limit
▪ So, too, does some guess about where the government may set a capping limit.
▪ That program sets limits on campaign expenditures while supplying taxpayer money as matching funds to candidates.
▪ It is vital that you set limits for the amount of money that you will deposit with each bank.
▪ They spoil him by not setting limits.
▪ The system manager should be able to set limits on disk space allocation and printer usage for each user of the system.
▪ The Cabinet is set to impose strict limits on public sector pay.
▪ They may be quite empathetic, but not very disciplined about setting limits or giving their children structure.
motion
▪ A study by military experts was immediately set in motion.
▪ In any case, an irresponsible control program has been set in motion without sufficient information as to its future effects.
▪ Oliver corrected the clock and set it in motion.
▪ Corot set the countryside in motion.
▪ George I set in motion the preparation of the Royal Charter for his new bank.
▪ But once set in motion, the enormous machinery of a traditional wedding had a life of its own.
▪ It was decided to set in motion negotiations to form a Neighbourhood Watch in the Belmont Road area.
▪ None the less, the reversal that was set in motion reverberated powerfully on both sides of the thirty-eighth parallel.
objective
▪ Obviously they need to be countered and an objective must be set.
▪ The first step in project management is to set a measurable objective.
▪ If you set unobtainable objectives you will be seen to have failed even if you do a wonderful job.
▪ The board annually will set performance objectives for the superintendent and he will receive bonuses based on how many he meets.
▪ Assessing community care needs in their localities, setting objectives and priorities and formulating community care plans. 2.
▪ First we identify our target and set a measurable objective that states from where to where by when.
▪ They do not set themselves objectives to achieve.
▪ Shaper: pushes the team towards action, sets objectives and looks for outcomes; dominant, extrovert and anxious.
pace
▪ Or is it your children who are setting the ecological pace?
▪ He or she controls the room and sets the pace.
▪ Zeta's Lad set the pace.
▪ He blamed me for setting too fast a pace.
▪ This should result in fundholders setting the pace and others benefiting.
▪ Pharmaceutical companies were the top-performing stocks in 1995 and set the pace today.
▪ Horak forged ahead on his own but set too fast a pace and died at Elmbridge.
▪ Your rhythm should set the pace of the fight.
pattern
▪ But clearly it was imperialistic palaeontologists rather than imperialist fossils that set the pattern in both cases.
▪ That first day seemed to set the pattern for the following weeks.
▪ In form and style they set the pattern for the first generation of purpose-built station buildings.
▪ All this set the pattern for the next few days.
▪ While working in films Mary set the pattern of work for the next fifty years.
▪ I suppose that set a pattern.
▪ Ever again would set a pattern.
precedent
▪ But it is Michael Jackson's deal which may set precedents the music business will later regret.
▪ The ruling also set a firm precedent against deals reached among lawyers handling business lawsuits to keep court filings secret.
▪ Part of me thinks that he is setting a useful precedent.
▪ Guidelines have been laid, standards are set, and precedents have been established.
▪ School officials say releasing those kinds of notes would set a bad precedent and inhibit communication among teachers and administrators.
▪ Once again Edward had set precedents and opened opportunities for extensive royal exploitation subsequently.
▪ Employment lawyer Robert Rosati says courts are setting a troublesome precedent when they let such suits to go forward.
price
▪ If I have a niche, I set the price.
▪ Oil companies all set the same prices, but not the same salaries.
▪ Subsidiaries will be free to set their own prices.
▪ Beaudoin said Fine Host routinely sets prices for vendors with whom it contracts.
▪ Regulatory agencies set prices and specify quality and quantity of output.
▪ Goldman analyst Jack Kelly set a 12-month target price on the stock of 45 to 46 a share.
record
▪ The previous day she had set a new world record in the preliminaries.
▪ Average daily share volume set a record at 346 million shares a day, according to preliminary data from the exchange.
▪ The next running back to rumble for 200 yards in a game this season will set a league record.
▪ I want to set the record straight.
▪ In fact, it set a record for first-day sales of a double-length album with 855, 000 sales nationally.
▪ They have a duty to set the record straight, otherwise they are conniving at falsehood.
▪ The presidential race is setting records.
scene
▪ You set the scene, as it were, for your presentation and then proceed to follow the pattern laid down.
▪ I was thinking of setting a scene from my novel here.
▪ The facts Before turning to the precise terms of the statutory provisions I must set the scene by referring to the facts.
▪ Jane saw it first, as they sat waiting for the lights to be set for the next scene.
▪ The interpretation of Mannheim's project that von Schelting initiated set the scene for its incorporation into mainstream functionalist sociology.
▪ But three key findings have set the scene for subsequent debate on the system.
▪ Concern about a baby's bowel movements can set the scene for concern and anxiety.
▪ Annan set the scene for the introduction of Channel 4.
shop
▪ At the age of 22 he set up shop in Sweeting's Alley, which was near the Royal Exchange.
▪ The Barrio Grill originally set up shop just over a year ago.
▪ Early registration figures are also said to be disappointing for the banks and building societies which have set up share shops.
▪ She set up the shop in 1990 with the intention of selling yarn, patterns and accessories.
▪ In the course of that interview, he admitted employing men to set fire to his shop.
▪ Once we set out for the shops, Lindy guessed where we were going and took her habitual, well-remembered route.
sight
▪ But where there are sellers there are buyers, and it was this latter rare species we had set our sights on.
▪ That was how it was with Master Yehudi: the better things went for us, the higher he set his sights.
▪ Awford was booked and Barnes set his sights 20 yards from goal.
▪ And Bettman has set his sights high.
▪ I've told you before - you've got to set your sights high.
▪ Gazing intently into her computer screen, Christine Montgomery has set her sights on the next generation of electronic language translators.
▪ The new party was setting its sights on multiparty federal elections expected by the end of the year.
▪ Both women were certain early on that they wanted a high-profile career related to politics and set their sights on achieving it.
stage
▪ Each stage of development effectively sets the stage for the next.
▪ Thus, it further sets the stage for later discussion of the other four pillars.
▪ Each time his performance had grown more elaborate: he wrote the script, set the stage, and took the lead.
▪ That sets the stage for the matrix arrangement.
▪ They would set up the stage among buildings he felt he somehow knew.
▪ I brought items from home to set up the stage.
▪ The changes that occurred as a result of this rethinking set the stage for Workplace 2000.
standard
▪ Creative, determined to set the highest standards.
▪ Let our little group set a standard for the rest.
▪ Recently, the federal government set its own minimum standards for landfills.
▪ A combination of history, tradition and resources makes it possible for the cathedral to set high standards, musically as well as liturgically.
▪ Falafel, on the other hand, is great and sets new standard for falafel crunch.
▪ We will set up a statutory General Teaching Council to improve professional qualifications and set standards for teacher training and retraining.
▪ He set the standards for everyone.
sun
▪ The sun set behind us, reflecting gold on the building.
▪ When the tide is low and the sun high, I set off with a bucket to circle the nubble.
▪ The sun was setting behind the black rocks, and the sea was a blaze of luminous colour.
▪ The sun was setting behind the clouds.
▪ The sun was setting on the tops of the distant mountains.
▪ The sun set nearly an hour ago.
▪ The sun had set and dusk was closing in.
▪ By the time we started walking back to the car, the sun had set.
table
▪ Later she helped Mr Priddy to set the dining table upstairs.
▪ The smoke was broken off the cabin chimney where she had dropped it while setting the table eighteen years ago.
▪ Some estimates of the round-trip transactions costs involved in stock index arbitrage are set out in Table 5.1.
▪ While a kettle boiled she could set a table, light a fire, and watch over a cooking breakfast.
▪ Rosenberg said Cup told him that he could set up a table to give away shirts.
▪ After that we set the dining table and served the lunch we had brought.
▪ She ran when she made the beds, ran when she set the table.
target
▪ In this limited way care programming can be used to set targets and measure progress in developing mental health services.
▪ The Bundesbank officially bases its interest rate policy on M3 growth and sets a growth target each year.
▪ And that's a problem for the Government, which has set targets for cutting the number of deaths on the roads.
▪ Thus, setting annual targets for M3 would lead directly to bringing inflation under control.
▪ Self-assessment is a key feature of the module and students should set targets for themselves based on their initial self-assessment.
▪ Later, the results are carefully compared with the intentions in order to identify remedial action or set new targets.
▪ They have set themselves hugely ambitious targets.
▪ Our Health Initiative will set targets for better health, backed by effective action.
task
▪ How should we set about the task of becoming wise?
▪ Using the pen he had bought from the deaf mute, he set about his task with diligence.
▪ The Conservative Government, under Mrs Thatcher, set about the task straight away.
▪ Many pressure groups set themselves the task of sedulously winning over influential opinion to their view of the future.
▪ They immediately set about the task of pushing the jostling photographers away from the limousine.
▪ In retirement he had set himself the task of making a replica Tomkin long-case clock.
▪ They moved to Sherburn-in-Elmet and set to their new task.
▪ We were set different tasks to do eg getting across an area of grass which had poison on it.
tone
▪ Reception areas, which should set the tone for the entire hotel, so often let it down.
▪ The back row set the tone of the class because it acted throughout as one, indivisible, incredibly noisy unit.
▪ These were the Cold Warriors who set the tone for the Fifties.
▪ When the top leader places that kind of premium on seamless communication and openness, it sets the tone for everyone.
▪ This more or less set the tone for a miserable day's fending.
▪ Director Andrew Lane has set the tone of the movie at a pitch somewhere between sendup and subtle humor.
▪ Start with the mood music, where Maastricht sets a tone but not much more.
▪ An anecdote could be cited as a means of setting the tone of area of concern.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(set of) wheels
a closed set (of sth)
be written/set/cast in tablets of stone
on your mark(s), get set, go!
put/lay/set down a marker
put/leave/set sth to one side
▪ Graham has no plans to fly this aircraft at present and will put it to one side as soon as assembly and testing is complete.
▪ She put it to one side, and opened the folder of photographs.
put/set pen to paper
▪ And striker Geoff Ferris is likely to put pen to paper for 12 months.
▪ Good old-fashioned motives for putting pen to paper.
▪ He then put pen to paper, and soon a stream of adjectives was flowing.
▪ I had written a very fine book in my head before arriving, without setting pen to paper.
▪ I have put pen to paper sparingly, aware that pictures speak louder than words.
▪ In February of 1942 and again in May of that year he had put pen to paper and logged his past.
▪ So if you are fun-loving and open-minded, put pen to paper.
▪ So why not put pen to paper and win a wardrobe of fashions.
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
put/set the cat among the pigeons
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
set foot in sth
▪ The last time Molly set foot in that house was 26 years ago.
▪ After she sued, Harvard said it would file criminal trespass charges against Garzilli if she sets foot in the department.
▪ As soon as I set foot in there, I knew that I had to be involved somehow.
▪ August paid off the bank, then never set foot in New Albion or Lake Wobegon again.
▪ However, he had never set foot in the village again.
▪ Louis Johnson came to despise the Alsops and ordered Pentagon reception desks to inform him whenever they set foot in the building.
▪ She had set foot in Skipton and passed through Keighley, but these were small country towns.
▪ Streetsmart in Jersey City, many have never set foot in the big town across the Hudson.
▪ The moment I set foot in this house, my world turned upside down.
set great/considerable etc store by sth
▪ Being thus disappointed, I now set great store by what the first night might bring.
▪ Bourbon producers set great store by the soft local water which passes through limestone on its way to the distilleries.
▪ Britain had previously set great store by the Lisbon economic summit two years ago, but progress has subsequently been slow.
▪ He had worked for the same engineering firm for thirty years and he had always set great store by the company pension.
▪ It apparently sets great store by creating business and completing assignments relatively quickly.
▪ Organizations which set great store by behavioural conformity often develop patterns of operation which can appear ridiculous in their manifestations.
▪ The ancient Israelites set great store by proper burial.
set light to sth
▪ A spark can just as easily set light to your clothes as it can to a dryer full of washing.
▪ Flames set light to his jacket and Mr Williams was helped into a nearby toilet where his hands were drenched with water.
▪ My father had twice set light to the form.
▪ That spark can set light to further proposals, ideas and chances in the manager's mind.
▪ The police set light to it.
▪ The vandals broke into the house, piled the cooker with linen then switched it on and set light to it.
▪ Would we leave a thing like that when any kiddy could knock the chocks out or set light to it?
▪ Youths fired an arrow through the window of one house and set light to another in an attempt to silence them.
set sail
▪ We set sail at sunrise.
▪ Backwards Pretend you are a beginner who has inadvertently forgotten which end of the board is forwards and set sail going backwards.
▪ But even if you only set sail in a comfy chair, this discussion is richly detailed in its own right.
▪ He hastened back to the ship and bade his crew set sail.
▪ In particular, on days of ill-omen ships could not set sail.
▪ It is small wonder that the idea of setting sail for an un-known land grew less and less attractive to him.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ The fisherman cut their lines and set sail for port, but the sea serpent continued to follow them.
▪ The vessel set sail late Tuesday for an undisclosed destination, the news agency said.
set sb's teeth on edge
▪ His high-pitched squeaky voice set my teeth on edge.
▪ At other times their self-evident frustration sets your teeth on edge.
▪ He w as filing arrow heads, and the sound of the metal on the whetstone set Burun's teeth on edge.
▪ It was all done so genteelly that it set McAllister's teeth on edge.
▪ That set our teeth on edge and bring our goose pimples rising like porpoises after mackerel.
set sb/sth apart
▪ Such seriousness and ambition in a very young man set him apart.
▪ The new software was a unique tool that set the Microsoft Network apart from other commercial online services.
▪ A penchant for setting oneself apart and above mere mortals.
▪ BAs gloomy as this prospect might be, it also set us apart.
▪ I was the first, but beyond that I see nothing to set me apart from anyone else.
▪ Such seriousness, intensity, and power in a young man set him apart and left an impression on others.
▪ They seemed to bend at the knee, setting their feet apart so that they could never be off balance when they moved.
▪ What set it apart was the way irrigation and power production were linked.
▪ What sets it apart is where it comes from.
set sth in train
▪ It is easy to make him look personally responsible for setting the process in train and bringing it to fruition.
▪ Why, oh, why did you set such enquiries in train?
set the Thames on fire
set the pace
▪ For most of the nineties, we were setting the pace in mobile phone technology.
▪ He or she controls the room and sets the pace.
▪ It is true that Newt Gingrich's Republicans set the pace.
▪ Pharmaceutical companies were the top-performing stocks in 1995 and set the pace today.
▪ They've got stronger since then and have set the pace in the championship race this season.
▪ This should result in fundholders setting the pace and others benefiting.
▪ Thus, the infant is setting the pace.
▪ Your rhythm should set the pace of the fight.
▪ Zeta's Lad set the pace.
set the scene
▪ Government tanks rolled into town, setting the scene for a bloody battle.
▪ Recent events have set the scene for a potentially violent confrontation between the demonstrators and the army.
▪ The negotiations in Geneva have set the scene for a possible agreement later in the year.
▪ Annan set the scene for the introduction of Channel 4.
▪ But three key findings have set the scene for subsequent debate on the system.
▪ Concern about a baby's bowel movements can set the scene for concern and anxiety.
▪ Kasparov's reply, 19 a3, set the scene for a dramatic and cliffhanging duel.
▪ Let's first set the scene.
▪ The interpretation of Mannheim's project that von Schelting initiated set the scene for its incorporation into mainstream functionalist sociology.
▪ You set the scene, as it were, for your presentation and then proceed to follow the pattern laid down.
set the seal on sth
▪ His three-day tour set the seal on reconciliation between the two communities.
▪ It set the seal on his depression; he was almost ready to go home.
set the stage for sth
▪ But later the deputies set the stage for possible compromise by agreeing to debate a referendum after all.
▪ But that simply set the stage for a final, beautiful flourish from Robins.
▪ Each stage of development effectively sets the stage for the next.
▪ That sets the stage for the matrix arrangement.
▪ The changes that occurred as a result of this rethinking set the stage for Workplace 2000.
▪ The vote set the stage for a government-wide review and partial rollback of affirmative action programs.
▪ Thus, it further sets the stage for later discussion of the other four pillars.
set the trend
▪ Larger corporations are setting the trend for better maternity benefits.
▪ To save the planet we must set the trend of caring for the environment.
▪ Young backpackers set the trend, and now people of all ages are looking for cheap ways to travel around Southeast Asia.
▪ But although the sensationally styled Calibra sets the trend, it is by no means the only exponent of the field.
▪ It caught on over here some years later with the Seven Men of Preston setting the trend.
▪ The bank rate sets the trend for home, vehicle and other consumer loans.
▪ The rate, which sets the trend for home and other consumer loans, is now at its lowest since November 1994.
set the wheels in motion/set the wheels turning
set the world on fire/alight
▪ And now we have Sliver which was the subject of much wrangling and hasn't exactly set the world on fire.
▪ But if Rhodes hasn't set the world on fire with his batting, he certainly has with his fielding.
▪ Either way, the speed and acceleration is not going to set the world on fire.
▪ It was a lovely accomplishment, of course, but nothing to set the world on fire with.
▪ None of the three papers was going to set the world on fire.
▪ The sonorities glow, and the whole thing is user-friendly without setting the world on fire.
set things aright
set tongues wagging
set up house
▪ He rarely left the Brooklyn apartment where he had set up house.
▪ Her parents were very upset when she set up house with her boyfriend.
▪ They first set up house together in Atlanta and moved to Miami three years later.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Diana and I were soon to set up house in Shepherd's Bush and our fortunes were inextricable for the next decade.
▪ He had even established a system for sending money home to their families once they had set up house in this country.
▪ I have to save enough money to set up house.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ They set up house in No. 93, which was now to let.
set up shop
▪ Dr. Rosen closed his downtown practice and set up shop in a suburban neighborhood.
▪ Jack got his law degree, then set up shop as a real estate lawyer.
▪ At the age of 22 he set up shop in Sweeting's Alley, which was near the Royal Exchange.
▪ Each failed when a dispute arose and some group walked out of the union to set up shop down the block.
▪ My body and the kindly Earth have set up shop against me.
▪ NxtWave opted not to set up shop in Silicon Valley and instead chose Langhorne.
▪ S., new steel mills are setting up shop.
▪ The two Yankees started the business set up shop right where you see it.
▪ Wade Smith was given salesman of the year in January and promptly left to set up shop on his own.
set your face against sth
▪ Alternatively, the rule-makers can set their faces against the pressures for change.
▪ Does the hon. Gentleman really want to set his face against the improvements that trust status could deliver?
▪ I would set my face against the casualisation of the Corporation.
▪ It has set its face against cutting prices.
▪ The Lord Chancellor set his face against growing criticism over his behaviour.
set your heart on sth
▪ He's set his heart on a new bike for Christmas.
▪ By January 1768 they were back in Vienna, where Leopold had set his heart on securing an opera commission for Wolfgang.
▪ He's always set his heart on going to Simon's school.
▪ He was not a man to give way easily and he had clearly set his heart on making her recognise her father.
▪ I have held no office because Thou did not will it, and I never set my heart on office.
▪ So now, after all, there was something she had set her heart on.
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
set/put sb straight
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
set/put sth in motion
▪ The discovery set in motion two days of searching for the bodies.
▪ A tiny pilot light, if you like, that was necessary to set everything else in motion.
▪ Corot set the countryside in motion.
▪ He has set the ball in motion.
▪ How easy to see how a white kid could set this in motion with hardly any effort.
▪ It is both wasteful and irresponsible to set experiments in motion and omit to record and analyse what happens.
▪ Oliver corrected the clock and set it in motion.
▪ On Jan. 13, Vega said, Guzman set his plot in motion.
▪ The programme had lost the man responsible for setting it in motion.
set/put sth to music
▪ She sat at the piano for hours, putting one of her poems to music.
▪ The Greek tragedy "Elektra" was set to music by Richard Strauss.
▪ But if you have an extremely subtle story, how are you going to set it to music?
▪ For Robin, a place to put mind to music.
▪ What were you going to do, set it to music?
set/put the record straight
▪ Having set the record straight there is a paradox.
▪ He sets the record straight by a thorough reconsideration of Addison's Cato, that tragedy constantly overrated at the time.
▪ I want to set the record straight.
▪ Or a desire to put the record straight?
▪ Taylor was given the perfect platform to set the record straight at yesterday's press conference.
▪ They have a duty to set the record straight, otherwise they are conniving at falsehood.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
set/start/keep the ball rolling
▪ Ali MacGraw set the ball rolling with Love Story.
▪ And laughter is infectious ... so a little bit of effort on the small screen could start the ball rolling.
▪ Does that make a difference, or did he and others just start the ball rolling?
▪ He will keep the ball rolling.
▪ Her words started the ball rolling.
▪ To start the ball rolling, the government was asked to contribute £1 million.
▪ Volume 2 deals with general idioms e.g. keep the ball rolling, the proof of the pudding.
▪ Wolves play a similar style, and at times one yearned for some one to set the ball rolling ... literally.
the jet set
the setting of the sun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ Anneka was set the huge task by Christian Aid on behalf of a family who fled from war-torn Mozambique.
▪ At the end of the session, they were set a homework task.
▪ Had the glue set yet?
▪ I still haven't figured out how to set the VCR to tape while I'm away.
▪ Is that all -- or has she set some other task for you as well?
▪ It's best to pour your yoghurt into small containers before it sets.
▪ Leave the jam in a cool place to set.
▪ Let the dessert set in the fridge for two hours.
▪ Mr Harris always sets a lot of homework.
▪ Put the jelly in the fridge for an hour to set.
▪ She set us some work to do in groups.
▪ The concrete will take several hours to set, so make sure no one walks on it.
▪ The play is set in Madrid in the year 1840.
▪ We set our alarm for five a.m. so we could get an early start.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He was not a man to give way easily and he had clearly set his heart on making her recognise her father.
▪ Much of what follows is set therefore in the form of questions which need to be considered by all of us.
▪ Spread the frosting on the brownies in a thin coat, only enough to cover, and set aside to firm.
▪ The first to be set is the backlight.
▪ The rate of interest, in the shape of a tax-free bonus, is set by the Treasury.
▪ They were set for the garlic and the prawns, if they made it quick.
II.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
complete
▪ The drive is transmitted into the adjacent mill building which houses two complete sets of grinding gear and allied crushers, etc.
▪ Almed with this information, one is prepared to undertake a serious examination of a complete set of financial statements.
▪ I tore up a complete set of the Encyclopedia Britannica once.
▪ The show consists of a complete set of 33 etchings and aquatints of traditional rhymes.
▪ The first issue was in 130 weekly parts at 2 % d. each, but apparently no complete set is recorded.
▪ Also used to refer to a complete set of characters forming a family in a particular design or style.
▪ Usually a complete set of information about the final result of the upstream cycle is transmitted to the downstream in one shot.
▪ Now we can choose from several complete sets of his piano music, and here is another.
different
▪ Repeat the request at a later time or repeat the request with a different set of data.
▪ Here was a set of fake brass handles incongruously mingled with a different set of pewter fixtures.
▪ A different set of keys will produce a different set of synonyms, and of unused record spaces.
▪ Mountaineering and race car driving, for example, require very different sets of capacities.
▪ Repeat on different sets of needles, not in the same place, changing colours when you wish.
▪ He or she has to have a very different skill set.
▪ Four different sets of stimuli were used.
▪ Throughout this chapter, I have demonstrated a different set of values and attitudes about reading.
full
▪ Nobody in the family seeks to find a full set of anything except, of course, books.
▪ In creating new users a parent may grant subsets, up to the full set, of his own privileges to his descendants.
▪ Nowadays, you know, a full set includes a card for every player in the major leagues.
▪ Emily Jane Wood needed a full set of dentures at a cost of £6.
▪ I never see a full set of plans.
▪ Remember that a full set of weights is not essential for the routines.
▪ I was lucky in that at least I had a full set of waterproofs.
new
▪ Sun Baojia has a new color set.
▪ Using Prestel, Ceefax and other technological information systems demands a new set of location skills.
▪ The changing economic, political and technological environment presents management with a new set of issues, requiring fresh approaches.
▪ In general, however, it was simply reinterpreting in new language a set of ancient popular beliefs.
▪ As part of this policy, Bancroft issued a new set of ecclesiastical canons in 1604.
▪ Or perhaps a new set of laws will come into being, by some sort of quantum fluctuation.
particular
▪ There are about 50 known neurotransmitters, each of which are used by a particular set of neurones.
▪ All the neighboring values had been tested but this particular exact set of circumstances had not.
▪ A particular set of social alliances and historical circumstances led to this specific version of nationalism.
▪ Another possibility is that the noun descriptions suggest a particular set of activities which become dominant in addressing schemas for interpretation.
▪ An aggro leader, for example, needs a particular set of clothes in order to maintain his image.
▪ Normally organisers will allow you to re-weigh on another set of scales if you believe that a particular set is reading heavy.
▪ Instead it will continue until the particular set of indexes have been applied, and then terminate.
▪ Why might an attempt to explain a particular set of phenomena flounder?
standard
▪ Each machine comes with a standard set of at least 35 different type-faces.
▪ When Hill departed, Harris had to call on Primus as his replacement, and go back to a standard defensive set.
▪ Proof correction marks a standard set of signs and symbols used in copy preparation and to indicate corrections on proofs.
▪ The companies said they will share technology and develop a standard set of communication protocols.
▪ Less than half the wines listed were selected for awards making the standard set one of the highest in the world.
▪ But they were built to a safety standard set 30 years ago.
▪ This approaches the standard set by the patient's charter.
▪ The standard set of Spectrum keys have been added to in an intelligent way too.
straight
▪ It was over in less than an hour with Christina winning in straight sets.
▪ Edberg succumbed with minimal resistance, losing in straight sets.
whole
▪ Ronnie Peterson, off-track, was a model of milk-drinking virtue and not unlike a whole set of happy-family cards.
▪ I wanted a whole set of them.
▪ The whole set of commands encapsulated in the visual procedure was then executed sequentially.
▪ Some people paint whole sets of dishes, one per visit.
▪ As it is easy to imagine, these changes produced a whole new set of issues.
▪ This story can be the springboard to a whole set of tales about the lion and the mouse.
▪ The three children were very rewarding in themselves but they created a whole new set of problems.
▪ One day she had confiscated his ties and replaced them with a whole new set.
■ NOUN
stage
▪ The scene in the studio resembled a stage set for the problem of cultural displacement that I have just described.
▪ Instead of looking at the stage set by genes, these researchers look at what people do.
▪ She belonged in this stage set, among these lies.
▪ It is barely bigger than a road on a stage set, and it disappears picturesquely around a bend.
▪ Like ... like a stage set.
▪ The cottage parlour looked like a stage set.
television
▪ Ten-year-old Bart and eight-year-old Lisa regularly hug their television set, often in preference to their parents.
▪ A television set rested on an antique pine blanket-chest at the foot of the bed.
▪ More than 32 million households in the region own a television set, which creates a potential audience of 100 million people.
▪ A television set is in the center of comfortable chairs and sofas.
▪ The television set demands your attention; you can not enjoy television from the next room.
▪ A television set was placed at the end of the purple couch, right at arm level.
▪ His son Lutz was still at home, slumped for ever in front of the television set.
▪ Margotte rarely turned on the television set.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(set of) wheels
a closed set (of sth)
be written/set/cast in tablets of stone
on your mark(s), get set, go!
put/lay/set down a marker
put/leave/set sth to one side
▪ Graham has no plans to fly this aircraft at present and will put it to one side as soon as assembly and testing is complete.
▪ She put it to one side, and opened the folder of photographs.
put/set pen to paper
▪ And striker Geoff Ferris is likely to put pen to paper for 12 months.
▪ Good old-fashioned motives for putting pen to paper.
▪ He then put pen to paper, and soon a stream of adjectives was flowing.
▪ I had written a very fine book in my head before arriving, without setting pen to paper.
▪ I have put pen to paper sparingly, aware that pictures speak louder than words.
▪ In February of 1942 and again in May of that year he had put pen to paper and logged his past.
▪ So if you are fun-loving and open-minded, put pen to paper.
▪ So why not put pen to paper and win a wardrobe of fashions.
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
set foot in sth
▪ The last time Molly set foot in that house was 26 years ago.
▪ After she sued, Harvard said it would file criminal trespass charges against Garzilli if she sets foot in the department.
▪ As soon as I set foot in there, I knew that I had to be involved somehow.
▪ August paid off the bank, then never set foot in New Albion or Lake Wobegon again.
▪ However, he had never set foot in the village again.
▪ Louis Johnson came to despise the Alsops and ordered Pentagon reception desks to inform him whenever they set foot in the building.
▪ She had set foot in Skipton and passed through Keighley, but these were small country towns.
▪ Streetsmart in Jersey City, many have never set foot in the big town across the Hudson.
▪ The moment I set foot in this house, my world turned upside down.
set great/considerable etc store by sth
▪ Being thus disappointed, I now set great store by what the first night might bring.
▪ Bourbon producers set great store by the soft local water which passes through limestone on its way to the distilleries.
▪ Britain had previously set great store by the Lisbon economic summit two years ago, but progress has subsequently been slow.
▪ He had worked for the same engineering firm for thirty years and he had always set great store by the company pension.
▪ It apparently sets great store by creating business and completing assignments relatively quickly.
▪ Organizations which set great store by behavioural conformity often develop patterns of operation which can appear ridiculous in their manifestations.
▪ The ancient Israelites set great store by proper burial.
set light to sth
▪ A spark can just as easily set light to your clothes as it can to a dryer full of washing.
▪ Flames set light to his jacket and Mr Williams was helped into a nearby toilet where his hands were drenched with water.
▪ My father had twice set light to the form.
▪ That spark can set light to further proposals, ideas and chances in the manager's mind.
▪ The police set light to it.
▪ The vandals broke into the house, piled the cooker with linen then switched it on and set light to it.
▪ Would we leave a thing like that when any kiddy could knock the chocks out or set light to it?
▪ Youths fired an arrow through the window of one house and set light to another in an attempt to silence them.
set sail
▪ We set sail at sunrise.
▪ Backwards Pretend you are a beginner who has inadvertently forgotten which end of the board is forwards and set sail going backwards.
▪ But even if you only set sail in a comfy chair, this discussion is richly detailed in its own right.
▪ He hastened back to the ship and bade his crew set sail.
▪ In particular, on days of ill-omen ships could not set sail.
▪ It is small wonder that the idea of setting sail for an un-known land grew less and less attractive to him.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ The fisherman cut their lines and set sail for port, but the sea serpent continued to follow them.
▪ The vessel set sail late Tuesday for an undisclosed destination, the news agency said.
set sb's teeth on edge
▪ His high-pitched squeaky voice set my teeth on edge.
▪ At other times their self-evident frustration sets your teeth on edge.
▪ He w as filing arrow heads, and the sound of the metal on the whetstone set Burun's teeth on edge.
▪ It was all done so genteelly that it set McAllister's teeth on edge.
▪ That set our teeth on edge and bring our goose pimples rising like porpoises after mackerel.
set sb/sth apart
▪ Such seriousness and ambition in a very young man set him apart.
▪ The new software was a unique tool that set the Microsoft Network apart from other commercial online services.
▪ A penchant for setting oneself apart and above mere mortals.
▪ BAs gloomy as this prospect might be, it also set us apart.
▪ I was the first, but beyond that I see nothing to set me apart from anyone else.
▪ Such seriousness, intensity, and power in a young man set him apart and left an impression on others.
▪ They seemed to bend at the knee, setting their feet apart so that they could never be off balance when they moved.
▪ What set it apart was the way irrigation and power production were linked.
▪ What sets it apart is where it comes from.
set sth in train
▪ It is easy to make him look personally responsible for setting the process in train and bringing it to fruition.
▪ Why, oh, why did you set such enquiries in train?
set the Thames on fire
set things aright
set tongues wagging
set up house
▪ He rarely left the Brooklyn apartment where he had set up house.
▪ Her parents were very upset when she set up house with her boyfriend.
▪ They first set up house together in Atlanta and moved to Miami three years later.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Diana and I were soon to set up house in Shepherd's Bush and our fortunes were inextricable for the next decade.
▪ He had even established a system for sending money home to their families once they had set up house in this country.
▪ I have to save enough money to set up house.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ They set up house in No. 93, which was now to let.
set up shop
▪ Dr. Rosen closed his downtown practice and set up shop in a suburban neighborhood.
▪ Jack got his law degree, then set up shop as a real estate lawyer.
▪ At the age of 22 he set up shop in Sweeting's Alley, which was near the Royal Exchange.
▪ Each failed when a dispute arose and some group walked out of the union to set up shop down the block.
▪ My body and the kindly Earth have set up shop against me.
▪ NxtWave opted not to set up shop in Silicon Valley and instead chose Langhorne.
▪ S., new steel mills are setting up shop.
▪ The two Yankees started the business set up shop right where you see it.
▪ Wade Smith was given salesman of the year in January and promptly left to set up shop on his own.
set your face against sth
▪ Alternatively, the rule-makers can set their faces against the pressures for change.
▪ Does the hon. Gentleman really want to set his face against the improvements that trust status could deliver?
▪ I would set my face against the casualisation of the Corporation.
▪ It has set its face against cutting prices.
▪ The Lord Chancellor set his face against growing criticism over his behaviour.
set your heart on sth
▪ He's set his heart on a new bike for Christmas.
▪ By January 1768 they were back in Vienna, where Leopold had set his heart on securing an opera commission for Wolfgang.
▪ He's always set his heart on going to Simon's school.
▪ He was not a man to give way easily and he had clearly set his heart on making her recognise her father.
▪ I have held no office because Thou did not will it, and I never set my heart on office.
▪ So now, after all, there was something she had set her heart on.
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
set/put sb straight
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
set/put sth in motion
▪ The discovery set in motion two days of searching for the bodies.
▪ A tiny pilot light, if you like, that was necessary to set everything else in motion.
▪ Corot set the countryside in motion.
▪ He has set the ball in motion.
▪ How easy to see how a white kid could set this in motion with hardly any effort.
▪ It is both wasteful and irresponsible to set experiments in motion and omit to record and analyse what happens.
▪ Oliver corrected the clock and set it in motion.
▪ On Jan. 13, Vega said, Guzman set his plot in motion.
▪ The programme had lost the man responsible for setting it in motion.
set/put sth to music
▪ She sat at the piano for hours, putting one of her poems to music.
▪ The Greek tragedy "Elektra" was set to music by Richard Strauss.
▪ But if you have an extremely subtle story, how are you going to set it to music?
▪ For Robin, a place to put mind to music.
▪ What were you going to do, set it to music?
set/put the record straight
▪ Having set the record straight there is a paradox.
▪ He sets the record straight by a thorough reconsideration of Addison's Cato, that tragedy constantly overrated at the time.
▪ I want to set the record straight.
▪ Or a desire to put the record straight?
▪ Taylor was given the perfect platform to set the record straight at yesterday's press conference.
▪ They have a duty to set the record straight, otherwise they are conniving at falsehood.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
set/start/keep the ball rolling
▪ Ali MacGraw set the ball rolling with Love Story.
▪ And laughter is infectious ... so a little bit of effort on the small screen could start the ball rolling.
▪ Does that make a difference, or did he and others just start the ball rolling?
▪ He will keep the ball rolling.
▪ Her words started the ball rolling.
▪ To start the ball rolling, the government was asked to contribute £1 million.
▪ Volume 2 deals with general idioms e.g. keep the ball rolling, the proof of the pudding.
▪ Wolves play a similar style, and at times one yearned for some one to set the ball rolling ... literally.
the jet set
the setting of the sun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ a set of commemorative gold coins
▪ a color television set
▪ a cutlery set
▪ a train set
▪ Amy bought him a set of tools for metal and woodworking.
▪ For sale - "The Guitarist" magazine - complete set, 1984-1992.
▪ He soon hooked up with the set of young people he knew who had already moved to the city.
▪ I gave a spare set of house keys to my neighbours.
▪ I was useless at school -- always in the bottom set in every subject.
▪ In the second set, Sampras led 5 - 4.
▪ She's in set one for maths and English and set two for history.
▪ She likes to mingle with the arty set.
▪ She was on the set early to read over her new lines.
▪ The first set of questions wasn't too bad, but they got really difficult after that.
▪ The head teacher was presented with a set of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, worth more than £1,600.
▪ Wagner won a Tony for the set of "On the Twentieth Century."
▪ We started the meeting by agreeing on a set of objectives.
▪ We think you've improved sufficiently to go up to a higher set.
▪ You'll get a better set if you use gelatin.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But this is actually only one of six sets of regulations and guidance which are due to come into force.
▪ Four different sets of stimuli were used.
▪ He thus developed a theory which argues that there are two sets of factors at work.
▪ In addition, Ariat, which is carried by equestrian retailers and at Nordstrom, has made inroads beyond the horsey set.
▪ Like Mount Everest, the Mandelbrot set is just there!
▪ On February 6 the group presented to college president Buell Gallagher a set of five demands.
▪ Richard had been passed from one set of foster parents to another until he was ten.
▪ You could machine a set of four in a day.
III.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
criteria
▪ In the first method, data were analysed against set criteria for hypoxia and tachycardia.
▪ This dialogue box will search for data within set criteria, extract it and write it to a pre-defined output block.
▪ Admission is obtained by written application, proving that you fulfil the set criteria.
menu
▪ Buffet-style breakfast and lunch; set menu for dinner; mineral water flows from taps.
▪ Buffet-style breakfast and lunch; set menu for dinner; self service taverna.
▪ Dinner is a set menu of three courses.
▪ Breakfast is continental, whilst dinner is three courses from a set menu.
number
▪ Costs can be reduced if films are supplied under contract for a set number each month.
▪ There was only room in each circle for a set number of species.
▪ Each boat would then be licensed by horsepower for a set number of days at sea based on a three-year track record.
▪ In order to have a balanced diet, it's important to have a set number of units from each group each day.
▪ A set number of categories will largely determine the specificity of the headings to be included in the index.
pattern
▪ As we have said, each piece will have its own form, so no set patterns or rules can be formulated.
▪ The days of our falconry course had a set pattern.
▪ So it is very difficult to achieve what one might call a set pattern in life.
▪ They each travel in their own set pattern, but don't assume they're easy to avoid!
▪ Nineteenth century Looe was governed by a set pattern of seasons related to the fishing.
▪ The selling process essentially follows a set pattern that the salesperson learns from a manual.
▪ There is no set pattern for this.
▪ In contrast to this, the digestion of upper and lower isolated incisors follows no set pattern.
period
▪ Again, how many could be one in a set period of time would be measured.
▪ As Chapter 4 showed, the need to complete a task within a set period may produce a negative attitude towards it.
▪ Unfortunately, few activities can be shut down for set periods, most being operational all the year round.
▪ Performance standards could be set for the team based on a percentage reduction in those losses over a set period.
▪ Pro-format claim forms are completed at the end of a set period, eg one month.
▪ It is not possible to prescribe a set period of time, for the need will vary in different situations.
▪ You repay the money borrowed over a set period of time at a fixed monthly amount, which includes the interest.
▪ In minutes, the computer will produce 18 columns of net and discounted cash flows presented over a set period of time.
piece
▪ Remember all the goals scored from set pieces and corners the first season we came back up?
▪ There have been few set pieces.
▪ They were like set pieces in their ongoing battle that these days was devoid of any real malice.
▪ He did his various pieces of mime which were set pieces.
▪ Eleven minutes later Andrew McBride saw his set piece effort deflected past the post by a defender's stick.
▪ We might think, in retrospect, that it was a set piece of rather obvious connivance.
▪ Surely Deane is well-practised at set piece play.
price
▪ Each Player has a set price.
square
▪ And you had your instruments, your set squares and your T-squares and things.
text
▪ One of the set texts for Advent dealt with the birth of John the Baptist.
time
▪ There is a set time allowed for the council to receive comments on an application.
▪ The evening meal is served at a set time and is cooked to cordonbleu standard by Martha and is served by candlelight.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
(set of) wheels
be written/set/cast in tablets of stone
on your mark(s), get set, go!
put/lay/set down a marker
put/leave/set sth to one side
▪ Graham has no plans to fly this aircraft at present and will put it to one side as soon as assembly and testing is complete.
▪ She put it to one side, and opened the folder of photographs.
put/set pen to paper
▪ And striker Geoff Ferris is likely to put pen to paper for 12 months.
▪ Good old-fashioned motives for putting pen to paper.
▪ He then put pen to paper, and soon a stream of adjectives was flowing.
▪ I had written a very fine book in my head before arriving, without setting pen to paper.
▪ I have put pen to paper sparingly, aware that pictures speak louder than words.
▪ In February of 1942 and again in May of that year he had put pen to paper and logged his past.
▪ So if you are fun-loving and open-minded, put pen to paper.
▪ So why not put pen to paper and win a wardrobe of fashions.
put/set sb's mind at rest
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
put/set the cat among the pigeons
put/set/get your (own) house in order
▪ But Apple first must get its house in order.
▪ Commissioners are satisfied with the progress it is making to put its house in order.
▪ Following numerous complaints the Vicar of Woodford has been told to put his house in order.
▪ Henry had set his house in order but had no thoughts about setting off on crusade.
▪ Others have called on the council to step in and tell the firm to put its house in order.
▪ The Law Society no longer can support equally those who have put their house in order and those who have not.
put/set/turn your mind to sth
▪ A second glance put my mind to rest, but for a moment there it gave me a turn.
▪ Across the table, Lalage put her mind to the subjugation of Dada.
▪ Anybody could do what I do if they put their mind to it.
▪ But he can turn his mind to detailed needs, like pensions, if he has to.
▪ He would put his mind to other issues, one of which was sobering in its own right.
▪ I turned my mind to Archie.
▪ Whatever you set your mind to, your personal total obsession, this is what kills you.
▪ When Medea knew the deed was done she turned her mind to one still more dreadful.
set foot in sth
▪ The last time Molly set foot in that house was 26 years ago.
▪ After she sued, Harvard said it would file criminal trespass charges against Garzilli if she sets foot in the department.
▪ As soon as I set foot in there, I knew that I had to be involved somehow.
▪ August paid off the bank, then never set foot in New Albion or Lake Wobegon again.
▪ However, he had never set foot in the village again.
▪ Louis Johnson came to despise the Alsops and ordered Pentagon reception desks to inform him whenever they set foot in the building.
▪ She had set foot in Skipton and passed through Keighley, but these were small country towns.
▪ Streetsmart in Jersey City, many have never set foot in the big town across the Hudson.
▪ The moment I set foot in this house, my world turned upside down.
set great/considerable etc store by sth
▪ Being thus disappointed, I now set great store by what the first night might bring.
▪ Bourbon producers set great store by the soft local water which passes through limestone on its way to the distilleries.
▪ Britain had previously set great store by the Lisbon economic summit two years ago, but progress has subsequently been slow.
▪ He had worked for the same engineering firm for thirty years and he had always set great store by the company pension.
▪ It apparently sets great store by creating business and completing assignments relatively quickly.
▪ Organizations which set great store by behavioural conformity often develop patterns of operation which can appear ridiculous in their manifestations.
▪ The ancient Israelites set great store by proper burial.
set light to sth
▪ A spark can just as easily set light to your clothes as it can to a dryer full of washing.
▪ Flames set light to his jacket and Mr Williams was helped into a nearby toilet where his hands were drenched with water.
▪ My father had twice set light to the form.
▪ That spark can set light to further proposals, ideas and chances in the manager's mind.
▪ The police set light to it.
▪ The vandals broke into the house, piled the cooker with linen then switched it on and set light to it.
▪ Would we leave a thing like that when any kiddy could knock the chocks out or set light to it?
▪ Youths fired an arrow through the window of one house and set light to another in an attempt to silence them.
set sail
▪ We set sail at sunrise.
▪ Backwards Pretend you are a beginner who has inadvertently forgotten which end of the board is forwards and set sail going backwards.
▪ But even if you only set sail in a comfy chair, this discussion is richly detailed in its own right.
▪ He hastened back to the ship and bade his crew set sail.
▪ In particular, on days of ill-omen ships could not set sail.
▪ It is small wonder that the idea of setting sail for an un-known land grew less and less attractive to him.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ The fisherman cut their lines and set sail for port, but the sea serpent continued to follow them.
▪ The vessel set sail late Tuesday for an undisclosed destination, the news agency said.
set sb's teeth on edge
▪ His high-pitched squeaky voice set my teeth on edge.
▪ At other times their self-evident frustration sets your teeth on edge.
▪ He w as filing arrow heads, and the sound of the metal on the whetstone set Burun's teeth on edge.
▪ It was all done so genteelly that it set McAllister's teeth on edge.
▪ That set our teeth on edge and bring our goose pimples rising like porpoises after mackerel.
set sb/sth apart
▪ Such seriousness and ambition in a very young man set him apart.
▪ The new software was a unique tool that set the Microsoft Network apart from other commercial online services.
▪ A penchant for setting oneself apart and above mere mortals.
▪ BAs gloomy as this prospect might be, it also set us apart.
▪ I was the first, but beyond that I see nothing to set me apart from anyone else.
▪ Such seriousness, intensity, and power in a young man set him apart and left an impression on others.
▪ They seemed to bend at the knee, setting their feet apart so that they could never be off balance when they moved.
▪ What set it apart was the way irrigation and power production were linked.
▪ What sets it apart is where it comes from.
set sth in train
▪ It is easy to make him look personally responsible for setting the process in train and bringing it to fruition.
▪ Why, oh, why did you set such enquiries in train?
set the Thames on fire
set the pace
▪ For most of the nineties, we were setting the pace in mobile phone technology.
▪ He or she controls the room and sets the pace.
▪ It is true that Newt Gingrich's Republicans set the pace.
▪ Pharmaceutical companies were the top-performing stocks in 1995 and set the pace today.
▪ They've got stronger since then and have set the pace in the championship race this season.
▪ This should result in fundholders setting the pace and others benefiting.
▪ Thus, the infant is setting the pace.
▪ Your rhythm should set the pace of the fight.
▪ Zeta's Lad set the pace.
set the scene
▪ Government tanks rolled into town, setting the scene for a bloody battle.
▪ Recent events have set the scene for a potentially violent confrontation between the demonstrators and the army.
▪ The negotiations in Geneva have set the scene for a possible agreement later in the year.
▪ Annan set the scene for the introduction of Channel 4.
▪ But three key findings have set the scene for subsequent debate on the system.
▪ Concern about a baby's bowel movements can set the scene for concern and anxiety.
▪ Kasparov's reply, 19 a3, set the scene for a dramatic and cliffhanging duel.
▪ Let's first set the scene.
▪ The interpretation of Mannheim's project that von Schelting initiated set the scene for its incorporation into mainstream functionalist sociology.
▪ You set the scene, as it were, for your presentation and then proceed to follow the pattern laid down.
set the seal on sth
▪ His three-day tour set the seal on reconciliation between the two communities.
▪ It set the seal on his depression; he was almost ready to go home.
set the stage for sth
▪ But later the deputies set the stage for possible compromise by agreeing to debate a referendum after all.
▪ But that simply set the stage for a final, beautiful flourish from Robins.
▪ Each stage of development effectively sets the stage for the next.
▪ That sets the stage for the matrix arrangement.
▪ The changes that occurred as a result of this rethinking set the stage for Workplace 2000.
▪ The vote set the stage for a government-wide review and partial rollback of affirmative action programs.
▪ Thus, it further sets the stage for later discussion of the other four pillars.
set the trend
▪ Larger corporations are setting the trend for better maternity benefits.
▪ To save the planet we must set the trend of caring for the environment.
▪ Young backpackers set the trend, and now people of all ages are looking for cheap ways to travel around Southeast Asia.
▪ But although the sensationally styled Calibra sets the trend, it is by no means the only exponent of the field.
▪ It caught on over here some years later with the Seven Men of Preston setting the trend.
▪ The bank rate sets the trend for home, vehicle and other consumer loans.
▪ The rate, which sets the trend for home and other consumer loans, is now at its lowest since November 1994.
set the wheels in motion/set the wheels turning
set the world on fire/alight
▪ And now we have Sliver which was the subject of much wrangling and hasn't exactly set the world on fire.
▪ But if Rhodes hasn't set the world on fire with his batting, he certainly has with his fielding.
▪ Either way, the speed and acceleration is not going to set the world on fire.
▪ It was a lovely accomplishment, of course, but nothing to set the world on fire with.
▪ None of the three papers was going to set the world on fire.
▪ The sonorities glow, and the whole thing is user-friendly without setting the world on fire.
set things aright
set tongues wagging
set up house
▪ He rarely left the Brooklyn apartment where he had set up house.
▪ Her parents were very upset when she set up house with her boyfriend.
▪ They first set up house together in Atlanta and moved to Miami three years later.
▪ And he set up house for her in a bungalow further along the river, in a nice secluded part.
▪ Diana and I were soon to set up house in Shepherd's Bush and our fortunes were inextricable for the next decade.
▪ He had even established a system for sending money home to their families once they had set up house in this country.
▪ I have to save enough money to set up house.
▪ The two new Mr and Mrs Kim-Soons set up house next door.
▪ They set up house in No. 93, which was now to let.
set up shop
▪ Dr. Rosen closed his downtown practice and set up shop in a suburban neighborhood.
▪ Jack got his law degree, then set up shop as a real estate lawyer.
▪ At the age of 22 he set up shop in Sweeting's Alley, which was near the Royal Exchange.
▪ Each failed when a dispute arose and some group walked out of the union to set up shop down the block.
▪ My body and the kindly Earth have set up shop against me.
▪ NxtWave opted not to set up shop in Silicon Valley and instead chose Langhorne.
▪ S., new steel mills are setting up shop.
▪ The two Yankees started the business set up shop right where you see it.
▪ Wade Smith was given salesman of the year in January and promptly left to set up shop on his own.
set your face against sth
▪ Alternatively, the rule-makers can set their faces against the pressures for change.
▪ Does the hon. Gentleman really want to set his face against the improvements that trust status could deliver?
▪ I would set my face against the casualisation of the Corporation.
▪ It has set its face against cutting prices.
▪ The Lord Chancellor set his face against growing criticism over his behaviour.
set your heart on sth
▪ He's set his heart on a new bike for Christmas.
▪ By January 1768 they were back in Vienna, where Leopold had set his heart on securing an opera commission for Wolfgang.
▪ He's always set his heart on going to Simon's school.
▪ He was not a man to give way easily and he had clearly set his heart on making her recognise her father.
▪ I have held no office because Thou did not will it, and I never set my heart on office.
▪ So now, after all, there was something she had set her heart on.
set/lay/clap eyes on sb/sth
▪ Bedford disliked Halsey the minute he set eyes on him.
▪ How could she possibly know, since he had not set eyes on the girl?
▪ I bonded on the second night I laid eyes on Hyakutake.
▪ Just hours earlier she had set eyes on the pretty two-year-old and sister Anna-Camilla, seven, for the first time.
▪ Never anywhere have I set eyes on such a one.
▪ No sooner did she set eyes on the gentleman than she recognised his pecuniary position to be merely temporary.
▪ The couple fell in love before they had even set eyes on each other during a six-month long distance courtship.
set/put sb's mind at rest
▪ Just to put your mind at ease, we will get a second opinion from a cardiac specialist.
▪ The doctor set my mind at rest by explaining exactly what effect the drug would have on me.
▪ But let me set your mind at rest.
▪ But she'd like to see him, to try and set her mind at rest.
▪ He's been very kind to me and Lily, as regards putting our minds at rest about Stella.
▪ He's unlikely to know how you feel, and until he does, he can't put your mind at rest.
▪ He must set their minds at rest about the Freddie affair, because they knew of Freddie.
▪ I wish I could put their minds at rest.
▪ It puts my mind at rest.
▪ Quite often, all that is required is a friendly chat to put your mind at rest.
set/put sth in motion
▪ The discovery set in motion two days of searching for the bodies.
▪ A tiny pilot light, if you like, that was necessary to set everything else in motion.
▪ Corot set the countryside in motion.
▪ He has set the ball in motion.
▪ How easy to see how a white kid could set this in motion with hardly any effort.
▪ It is both wasteful and irresponsible to set experiments in motion and omit to record and analyse what happens.
▪ Oliver corrected the clock and set it in motion.
▪ On Jan. 13, Vega said, Guzman set his plot in motion.
▪ The programme had lost the man responsible for setting it in motion.
set/put sth to music
▪ She sat at the piano for hours, putting one of her poems to music.
▪ The Greek tragedy "Elektra" was set to music by Richard Strauss.
▪ But if you have an extremely subtle story, how are you going to set it to music?
▪ For Robin, a place to put mind to music.
▪ What were you going to do, set it to music?
set/put the record straight
▪ Having set the record straight there is a paradox.
▪ He sets the record straight by a thorough reconsideration of Addison's Cato, that tragedy constantly overrated at the time.
▪ I want to set the record straight.
▪ Or a desire to put the record straight?
▪ Taylor was given the perfect platform to set the record straight at yesterday's press conference.
▪ They have a duty to set the record straight, otherwise they are conniving at falsehood.
set/put the world to rights
▪ He wanted to put the world to rights.
▪ More recently Lou has cleaned up his act and started setting the world to rights.
▪ That straightness of Time, that confining straightness, was one with the Western picture of setting the world to rights.
set/start/keep the ball rolling
▪ Ali MacGraw set the ball rolling with Love Story.
▪ And laughter is infectious ... so a little bit of effort on the small screen could start the ball rolling.
▪ Does that make a difference, or did he and others just start the ball rolling?
▪ He will keep the ball rolling.
▪ Her words started the ball rolling.
▪ To start the ball rolling, the government was asked to contribute £1 million.
▪ Volume 2 deals with general idioms e.g. keep the ball rolling, the proof of the pudding.
▪ Wolves play a similar style, and at times one yearned for some one to set the ball rolling ... literally.
the jet set
the setting of the sun
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ The company will match your donations to charity, up to a set limit.
▪ Workers earn a set amount for each piece they sew.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ By looking for a set result you are excluding all the learning potential from the exercise.
▪ Organized ski treks exist, their routes following set trails with accommodation enroute.
▪ So it is very difficult to achieve what one might call a set pattern in life.
▪ The Designer's floor model and plans would be complete with set construction hopefully under way.
▪ There is no set pattern for this.
▪ They each travel in their own set pattern, but don't assume they're easy to avoid!
▪ Unfortunately, few activities can be shut down for set periods, most being operational all the year round.
The Collaborative International Dictionary

Set

Set \Set\ (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Set; p. pr. & vb. n. Setting.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s["a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E. sit. [root]154. See Sit, and cf. Seize.]

  1. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end.

    I do set my bow in the cloud.
    --Gen. ix. 13.

  2. Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.

    Set your affection on things above.
    --Col. iii. 2.

    The Lord set a mark upon Cain.
    --Gen. iv. 15.

  3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be.

    The Lord thy God will set thee on high.
    --Deut. xxviii. 1.

    I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother.
    --Matt. x. 35.

    Every incident sets him thinking.
    --Coleridge.

  4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically:

    1. To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, to set a coach in the mud.

      They show how hard they are set in this particular.
      --Addison.

    2. To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, to set one's countenance.

      His eyes were set by reason of his age.
      --1 Kings xiv. 4.

      On these three objects his heart was set.
      --Macaulay.

      Make my heart as a millstone, set my face as a flint.
      --Tennyson.

    3. To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, to set pear trees in an orchard.

    4. To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, to set glass in a sash.

      And him too rich a jewel to be set In vulgar metal for a vulgar use.
      --Dryden.

    5. To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, to set milk for cheese.

  5. To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Specifically:

    1. To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw.

      Tables for to sette, and beddes make.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship.

    3. To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm.
      --Fielding.

    4. To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone.

    5. To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock.

    6. (Masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.

  6. To stake at play; to wager; to risk.

    I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die.
    --Shak.

  7. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.

    Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute.
    --Dryden.

  8. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse.

  9. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.

    High on their heads, with jewels richly set, Each lady wore a radiant coronet.
    --Dryden.

    Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms.
    --Wordsworth.

  10. To value; to rate; -- with at.

    Be you contented, wearing now the garland, To have a son set your decrees at naught.
    --Shak.

    I do not set my life at a pin's fee.
    --Shak.

  11. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; -- said of hunting dogs.

  12. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned.

  13. To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill. [Scot.]

  14. (Print.) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page. To set abroach. See Abroach. [Obs.] --Shak. To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, to set one thing against another. To set agoing, to cause to move. To set apart, to separate to a particular use; to separate from the rest; to reserve. To set a saw, to bend each tooth a little, every alternate one being bent to one side, and the intermediate ones to the other side, so that the opening made by the saw may be a little wider than the thickness of the back, to prevent the saw from sticking. To set aside.

    1. To leave out of account; to pass by; to omit; to neglect; to reject; to annul.

      Setting aside all other considerations, I will endeavor to know the truth, and yield to that.
      --Tillotson.

    2. To set apart; to reserve; as, to set aside part of one's income.

    3. (Law) See under Aside. To set at defiance, to defy. To set at ease, to quiet; to tranquilize; as, to set the heart at ease. To set at naught, to undervalue; to contemn; to despise. ``Ye have set at naught all my counsel.'' --Prov. i. 25. To set a trap To set a snare, or To set a gin, to put it in a proper condition or position to catch prey; hence, to lay a plan to deceive and draw another into one's power. To set at work, or To set to work.

      1. To cause to enter on work or action, or to direct how tu enter on work.

      2. To apply one's self; -- used reflexively. To set before.

        1. To bring out to view before; to exhibit.

        2. To propose for choice to; to offer to. To set by.

          1. To set apart or on one side; to reject.

          2. To attach the value of (anything) to. ``I set not a straw by thy dreamings.'' --Chaucer. To set by the compass, to observe and note the bearing or situation of by the compass. To set case, to suppose; to assume. Cf. Put case, under Put, v. t. [Obs.] --Chaucer. To set down.

            1. To enter in writing; to register.

              Some rules were to be set down for the government of the army.
              --Clarendon.

            2. To fix; to establish; to ordain.

              This law we may name eternal, being that order which God . . . hath set down with himself, for himself to do all things by.
              --Hooker.

      3. To humiliate. To set eyes on, to see; to behold; to fasten the eyes on. To set fire to, or To set on fire, to communicate fire to; fig., to inflame; to enkindle the passions of; to irritate. To set flying (Naut.), to hook to halyards, sheets, etc., instead of extending with rings or the like on a stay; -- said of a sail. To set forth.

        1. To manifest; to offer or present to view; to exhibt; to display.

        2. To publish; to promulgate; to make appear.
          --Waller.

        3. To send out; to prepare and send. [Obs.] The Venetian admiral had a fleet of sixty galleys, set forth by the Venetians. --Knolles. To set forward.

          1. To cause to advance.

          2. To promote. To set free, to release from confinement, imprisonment, or bondage; to liberate; to emancipate. To set in, to put in the way; to begin; to give a start to. If you please to assist and set me in, I will recollect myself. --Collier. To set in order, to adjust or arrange; to reduce to method. ``The rest will I set in order when I come.'' --1 Cor. xi. 34. To set milk.

            1. To expose it in open dishes in order that the cream may rise to the surface.

            2. To cause it to become curdled as by the action of rennet. See 4 (e) . To set much by or To set little by, to care much, or little, for. To set of, to value; to set by. [Obs.] ``I set not an haw of his proverbs.'' --Chaucer. To set off.

              1. To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off; as, to set off a portion of an estate.

              2. To adorn; to decorate; to embellish.

                They . . . set off the worst faces with the best airs.
                --Addison.

          3. To give a flattering description of. To set off against, to place against as an equivalent; as, to set off one man's services against another's. To set on or To set upon.

            1. To incite; to instigate. ``Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this.''
              --Shak.

            2. To employ, as in a task. `` Set on thy wife to observe.''
              --Shak.

            3. To fix upon; to attach strongly to; as, to set one's heart or affections on some object. See definition 2, above. To set one's cap for. See under Cap, n. To set one's self against, to place one's self in a state of enmity or opposition to. To set one's teeth, to press them together tightly. To set on foot, to set going; to put in motion; to start. To set out.

              1. To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit; as, to set out the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate; to set out the widow's thirds.

              2. To publish, as a proclamation. [Obs.]

              3. To adorn; to embellish.

                An ugly woman, in rich habit set out with jewels, nothing can become.
                --Dryden.

    4. To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish. [R.]

      The Venetians pretend they could set out, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war.
      --Addison.

    5. To show; to display; to recommend; to set off.

      I could set out that best side of Luther.
      --Atterbury.

    6. To show; to prove. [R.] ``Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was.''
      --Atterbury.

    7. (Law) To recite; to state at large. To set over.

      1. To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander.

      2. To assign; to transfer; to convey. To set right, to correct; to put in order. To set sail. (Naut.) See under Sail, n. To set store by, to consider valuable. To set the fashion, to determine what shall be the fashion; to establish the mode. To set the teeth on edge, to affect the teeth with a disagreeable sensation, as when acids are brought in contact with them. To set the watch (Naut.), to place the starboard or port watch on duty. To set to, to attach to; to affix to. ``He . . . hath set to his seal that God is true.'' --John iii. 33. To set up.

        1. To erect; to raise; to elevate; as, to set up a building, or a machine; to set up a post, a wall, a pillar.

        2. Hence, to exalt; to put in power. ``I will . . . set up the throne of David over Israel.''
          --2 Sam. iii. 10.

      3. To begin, as a new institution; to institute; to establish; to found; as, to set up a manufactory; to set up a school.

      4. To enable to commence a new business; as, to set up a son in trade.

      5. To place in view; as, to set up a mark.

      6. To raise; to utter loudly; as, to set up the voice.

        I'll set up such a note as she shall hear.
        --Dryden.

      7. To advance; to propose as truth or for reception; as, to set up a new opinion or doctrine.
        --T. Burnet.

    8. To raise from depression, or to a sufficient fortune; as, this good fortune quite set him up.

    9. To intoxicate. [Slang]

    10. (Print.) To put in type; as, to set up copy; to arrange in words, lines, etc., ready for printing; as, to set up type.

      To set up the rigging (Naut.), to make it taut by means of tackles.
      --R. H. Dana, Jr.

      Syn: See Put.

Set

Set \Set\ (s[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Set; p. pr. & vb. n. Setting.] [OE. setten, AS. setton; akin to OS. settian, OFries. setta, D. zetten, OHG. sezzen, G. setzen, Icel. setja, Sw. s["a]tta, Dan. s?tte, Goth. satjan; causative from the root of E. sit. [root]154. See Sit, and cf. Seize.]

  1. To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end.

    I do set my bow in the cloud.
    --Gen. ix. 13.

  2. Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.

    Set your affection on things above.
    --Col. iii. 2.

    The Lord set a mark upon Cain.
    --Gen. iv. 15.

  3. To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be.

    The Lord thy God will set thee on high.
    --Deut. xxviii. 1.

    I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother.
    --Matt. x. 35.

    Every incident sets him thinking.
    --Coleridge.

  4. To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to. Specifically:

    1. To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, to set a coach in the mud.

      They show how hard they are set in this particular.
      --Addison.

    2. To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, to set one's countenance.

      His eyes were set by reason of his age.
      --1 Kings xiv. 4.

      On these three objects his heart was set.
      --Macaulay.

      Make my heart as a millstone, set my face as a flint.
      --Tennyson.

    3. To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, to set pear trees in an orchard.

    4. To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, to set glass in a sash.

      And him too rich a jewel to be set In vulgar metal for a vulgar use.
      --Dryden.

    5. To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, to set milk for cheese.

  5. To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt. Specifically:

    1. To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw.

      Tables for to sette, and beddes make.
      --Chaucer.

    2. To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship.

    3. To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm.
      --Fielding.

    4. To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone.

    5. To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock.

    6. (Masonry) To lower into place and fix solidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure.

  6. To stake at play; to wager; to risk.

    I have set my life upon a cast, And I will stand the hazard of the die.
    --Shak.

  7. To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.

    Set thy own songs, and sing them to thy lute.
    --Dryden.

  8. To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse.

  9. To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.

    High on their heads, with jewels richly set, Each lady wore a radiant coronet.
    --Dryden.

    Pastoral dales thin set with modern farms.
    --Wordsworth.

  10. To value; to rate; -- with at.

    Be you contented, wearing now the garland, To have a son set your decrees at naught.
    --Shak.

    I do not set my life at a pin's fee.
    --Shak.

  11. To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; -- said of hunting dogs.

  12. To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned.

  13. To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill. [Scot.]

  14. (Print.) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page. To set abroach. See Abroach. [Obs.] --Shak. To set against, to oppose; to set in comparison with, or to oppose to, as an equivalent in exchange; as, to set one thing against another. To set agoing, to cause to move. To set apart, to separate to a particular use; to separate from the rest; to reserve. To set a saw, to bend each tooth a little, every alternate one being bent to one side, and the intermediate ones to the other side, so that the opening made by the saw may be a little wider than the thickness of the back, to prevent the saw from sticking. To set aside.

    1. To leave out of account; to pass by; to omit; to neglect; to reject; to annul.

      Setting aside all other considerations, I will endeavor to know the truth, and yield to that.
      --Tillotson.

    2. To set apart; to reserve; as, to set aside part of one's income.

    3. (Law) See under Aside. To set at defiance, to defy. To set at ease, to quiet; to tranquilize; as, to set the heart at ease. To set at naught, to undervalue; to contemn; to despise. ``Ye have set at naught all my counsel.'' --Prov. i. 25. To set a trap To set a snare, or To set a gin, to put it in a proper condition or position to catch prey; hence, to lay a plan to deceive and draw another into one's power. To set at work, or To set to work.

      1. To cause to enter on work or action, or to direct how tu enter on work.

      2. To apply one's self; -- used reflexively. To set before.

        1. To bring out to view before; to exhibit.

        2. To propose for choice to; to offer to. To set by.

          1. To set apart or on one side; to reject.

          2. To attach the value of (anything) to. ``I set not a straw by thy dreamings.'' --Chaucer. To set by the compass, to observe and note the bearing or situation of by the compass. To set case, to suppose; to assume. Cf. Put case, under Put, v. t. [Obs.] --Chaucer. To set down.

            1. To enter in writing; to register.

              Some rules were to be set down for the government of the army.
              --Clarendon.

            2. To fix; to establish; to ordain.

              This law we may name eternal, being that order which God . . . hath set down with himself, for himself to do all things by.
              --Hooker.

      3. To humiliate. To set eyes on, to see; to behold; to fasten the eyes on. To set fire to, or To set on fire, to communicate fire to; fig., to inflame; to enkindle the passions of; to irritate. To set flying (Naut.), to hook to halyards, sheets, etc., instead of extending with rings or the like on a stay; -- said of a sail. To set forth.

        1. To manifest; to offer or present to view; to exhibt; to display.

        2. To publish; to promulgate; to make appear.
          --Waller.

        3. To send out; to prepare and send. [Obs.] The Venetian admiral had a fleet of sixty galleys, set forth by the Venetians. --Knolles. To set forward.

          1. To cause to advance.

          2. To promote. To set free, to release from confinement, imprisonment, or bondage; to liberate; to emancipate. To set in, to put in the way; to begin; to give a start to. If you please to assist and set me in, I will recollect myself. --Collier. To set in order, to adjust or arrange; to reduce to method. ``The rest will I set in order when I come.'' --1 Cor. xi. 34. To set milk.

            1. To expose it in open dishes in order that the cream may rise to the surface.

            2. To cause it to become curdled as by the action of rennet. See 4 (e) . To set much by or To set little by, to care much, or little, for. To set of, to value; to set by. [Obs.] ``I set not an haw of his proverbs.'' --Chaucer. To set off.

              1. To separate from a whole; to assign to a particular purpose; to portion off; as, to set off a portion of an estate.

              2. To adorn; to decorate; to embellish.

                They . . . set off the worst faces with the best airs.
                --Addison.

          3. To give a flattering description of. To set off against, to place against as an equivalent; as, to set off one man's services against another's. To set on or To set upon.

            1. To incite; to instigate. ``Thou, traitor, hast set on thy wife to this.''
              --Shak.

            2. To employ, as in a task. `` Set on thy wife to observe.''
              --Shak.

            3. To fix upon; to attach strongly to; as, to set one's heart or affections on some object. See definition 2, above. To set one's cap for. See under Cap, n. To set one's self against, to place one's self in a state of enmity or opposition to. To set one's teeth, to press them together tightly. To set on foot, to set going; to put in motion; to start. To set out.

              1. To assign; to allot; to mark off; to limit; as, to set out the share of each proprietor or heir of an estate; to set out the widow's thirds.

              2. To publish, as a proclamation. [Obs.]

              3. To adorn; to embellish.

                An ugly woman, in rich habit set out with jewels, nothing can become.
                --Dryden.

    4. To raise, equip, and send forth; to furnish. [R.]

      The Venetians pretend they could set out, in case of great necessity, thirty men-of-war.
      --Addison.

    5. To show; to display; to recommend; to set off.

      I could set out that best side of Luther.
      --Atterbury.

    6. To show; to prove. [R.] ``Those very reasons set out how heinous his sin was.''
      --Atterbury.

    7. (Law) To recite; to state at large. To set over.

      1. To appoint or constitute as supervisor, inspector, ruler, or commander.

      2. To assign; to transfer; to convey. To set right, to correct; to put in order. To set sail. (Naut.) See under Sail, n. To set store by, to consider valuable. To set the fashion, to determine what shall be the fashion; to establish the mode. To set the teeth on edge, to affect the teeth with a disagreeable sensation, as when acids are brought in contact with them. To set the watch (Naut.), to place the starboard or port watch on duty. To set to, to attach to; to affix to. ``He . . . hath set to his seal that God is true.'' --John iii. 33. To set up.

        1. To erect; to raise; to elevate; as, to set up a building, or a machine; to set up a post, a wall, a pillar.

        2. Hence, to exalt; to put in power. ``I will . . . set up the throne of David over Israel.''
          --2 Sam. iii. 10.

      3. To begin, as a new institution; to institute; to establish; to found; as, to set up a manufactory; to set up a school.

      4. To enable to commence a new business; as, to set up a son in trade.

      5. To place in view; as, to set up a mark.

      6. To raise; to utter loudly; as, to set up the voice.

        I'll set up such a note as she shall hear.
        --Dryden.

      7. To advance; to propose as truth or for reception; as, to set up a new opinion or doctrine.
        --T. Burnet.

    8. To raise from depression, or to a sufficient fortune; as, this good fortune quite set him up.

    9. To intoxicate. [Slang]

    10. (Print.) To put in type; as, to set up copy; to arrange in words, lines, etc., ready for printing; as, to set up type.

      To set up the rigging (Naut.), to make it taut by means of tackles.
      --R. H. Dana, Jr.

      Syn: See Put.

Set

Set \Set\ (s[e^]t), v. i.

  1. To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end.

    Ere the weary sun set in the west.
    --Shak.

    Thus this century sets with little mirth, and the next is likely to arise with more mourning.
    --Fuller.

  2. To fit music to words. [Obs.]
    --Shak.

  3. To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant. ``To sow dry, and set wet.''
    --Old Proverb.

  4. To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form; as, cuttings set well; the fruit has set well (i. e., not blasted in the blossom).

  5. To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened.

    A gathering and serring of the spirits together to resist, maketh the teeth to set hard one against another.
    --Bacon.

  6. To congeal; to concrete; to solidify; -- of cements, glues, gels, concrete, substances polymerizing into plastics, etc.

    That fluid substance in a few minutes begins to set.
    --Boyle.

  7. To have a certain direction in motion; to flow; to move on; to tend; as, the current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward.

  8. To begin to move; to go out or forth; to start; -- now followed by out.

    The king is set from London.
    --Shak.

  9. To indicate the position of game; -- said of a dog; as, the dog sets well; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter.

  10. To apply one's self; to undertake earnestly; -- now followed by out.

    If he sets industriously and sincerely to perform the commands of Christ, he can have no ground of doubting but it shall prove successful to him.
    --Hammond.

  11. To fit or suit one; to sit; as, the coat sets well. Note: [Colloquially used, but improperly, for sit.] Note: The use of the verb set for sit in such expressions as, the hen is setting on thirteen eggs; a setting hen, etc., although colloquially common, and sometimes tolerated in serious writing, is not to be approved. To set about, to commence; to begin. To set forward, to move or march; to begin to march; to advance. To set forth, to begin a journey. To set in.

    1. To begin; to enter upon a particular state; as, winter set in early.

    2. To settle one's self; to become established. ``When the weather was set in to be very bad.''
      --Addison.

    3. To flow toward the shore; -- said of the tide. To set off.

      1. To enter upon a journey; to start.

      2. (Typog.) To deface or soil the next sheet; -- said of the ink on a freshly printed sheet, when another sheet comes in contact with it before it has had time to dry. To set on or To set upon.

        1. To begin, as a journey or enterprise; to set about.

          He that would seriously set upon the search of truth.
          --Locke.

        2. To assault; to make an attack. --Bacon. Cassio hath here been set on in the dark. --Shak. To set out, to begin a journey or course; as, to set out for London, or from London; to set out in business;to set out in life or the world. To set to, to apply one's self to. To set up.

          1. To begin business or a scheme of life; as, to set up in trade; to set up for one's self.

          2. To profess openly; to make pretensions.

            Those men who set up for mortality without regard to religion, are generally but virtuous in part.
            --Swift.

Set

Set \Set\ (s[e^]t), a.

  1. Fixed in position; immovable; rigid; as, a set line; a set countenance.

  2. Firm; unchanging; obstinate; as, set opinions or prejudices.

  3. Regular; uniform; formal; as, a set discourse; a set battle. ``The set phrase of peace.''
    --Shak.

  4. Established; prescribed; as, set forms of prayer.

  5. Adjusted; arranged; formed; adapted. Set hammer.

    1. A hammer the head of which is not tightly fastened upon the handle, but may be reversed.
      --Knight.

    2. A hammer with a concave face which forms a die for shaping anything, as the end of a bolt, rivet, etc.

      Set line, a line to which a number of baited hooks are attached, and which, supported by floats and properly secured, may be left unguarded during the absence of the fisherman.

      Set nut, a jam nut or lock nut. See under Nut.

      Set screw (Mach.), a screw, sometimes cupped or printed at one end, and screwed through one part, as of a machine, tightly upon another part, to prevent the one from slipping upon the other.

      Set speech, a speech carefully prepared before it is delivered in public; a formal or methodical speech.

Set

Seth \Seth\, prop. n. (Egyptian Mythology) An evil beast-headed god with high square ears and a long snout; his was the brother and murderer of Osiris. Called also Set

Set

Set \Set\, prop. n. (Egyptian Mythology) An evil beast-headed god with high square ears and a long snout; his was the brother and murderer of Osiris. Called also Seth

Set

Set \Set\, n.

  1. The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination. ``Locking at the set of day.''
    --Tennyson.

    The weary sun hath made a golden set.
    --Shak.

  2. That which is set, placed, or fixed. Specifically:

    1. A young plant for growth; as, a set of white thorn.

    2. That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture. [Obs. or R.]

      We will in France, by God's grace, play a set Shall strike his father's crown into the hazard.
      --Shak.

      That was but civil war, an equal set.
      --Dryden.

    3. (Mech.) Permanent change of figure in consequence of excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.; as, the set of a spring.

    4. A kind of punch used for bending, indenting, or giving shape to, metal; as, a saw set.

    5. (Pile Driving) A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot be reached by the weight, or hammer, except by means of such an intervening piece. [Often incorrectly written sett.]

    6. (Carp.) A short steel spike used for driving the head of a nail below the surface. Called also nail set.

  3. [Perhaps due to confusion with sect, sept.] A number of things of the same kind, ordinarily used or classed together; a collection of articles which naturally complement each other, and usually go together; an assortment; a suit; as, a set of chairs, of china, of surgical or mathematical instruments, of books, etc. [In this sense, sometimes incorrectly written sett.]

  4. A number of persons associated by custom, office, common opinion, quality, or the like; a division; a group; a clique. ``Others of our set.''
    --Tennyson.

    This falls into different divisions, or sets, of nations connected under particular religions.
    --R. P. Ward.

  5. Direction or course; as, the set of the wind, or of a current.

  6. In dancing, the number of persons necessary to execute a quadrille; also, the series of figures or movements executed.

  7. The deflection of a tooth, or of the teeth, of a saw, which causes the the saw to cut a kerf, or make an opening, wider than the blade.

    1. A young oyster when first attached.

    2. Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality.

  8. (Tennis) A series of as many games as may be necessary to enable one side to win six. If at the end of the tenth game the score is a tie, the set is usually called a deuce set, and decided by an application of the rules for playing off deuce in a game. See Deuce.

  9. (Type Founding) That dimension of the body of a type called by printers the width.

  10. (Textiles) Any of various standards of measurement of the fineness of cloth; specif., the number of reeds in one inch and the number of threads in each reed. The exact meaning varies according to the location where it is used. Sometimes written sett.

  11. A stone, commonly of granite, shaped like a short brick and usually somewhat larger than one, used for street paving. Commonly written sett.

  12. Camber of a curved roofing tile.

  13. The manner, state, or quality of setting or fitting; fit; as, the set of a coat. [Colloq.]

  14. Any collection or group of objects considered together. Dead set.

    1. The act of a setter dog when it discovers the game, and remains intently fixed in pointing it out.

    2. A fixed or stationary condition arising from obstacle or hindrance; a deadlock; as, to be at a dead set.

    3. A concerted scheme to defraud by gaming; a determined onset.

      To make a dead set, to make a determined onset, literally or figuratively.

      Syn: Collection; series; group. See Pair.

Wikipedia

Set (game)

Set! redirects here. Set! is also a special form in the Scheme programming language.

Set is a real-time card game designed by Marsha Falco in 1974 and published by Set Enterprises in 1991. The deck consists of 81 cards varying in four features: number (one, two, or three); symbol (diamond, squiggle, oval); shading (solid, striped, or open); and color (red, green, or purple). Each possible combination of features (e.g., a card with three striped green diamonds) appears precisely once in the deck.

Set

Set or The Set may refer to:

Set (river)

The Set (riu de Set in Catalan) is a river in Catalonia (northeastern Spain).

Category:Rivers of Spain Category:Rivers of Catalonia

Set (darts)

A set in darts consists of a sequence of legs (games) played, ending when the count of legs won meets certain criteria. Throwing first is considered an advantage in a leg, so players alternate who throws first in each leg during the set.

Generally, a set will consist of the best of five legs (first player to win three) - although there are some exceptions. The most notable being the Winmau World Masters, where a set is the best of three legs (first to two).

Set (mathematics)

In mathematics, a set is a collection of distinct objects, considered as an object in its own right. For example, the numbers 2, 4, and 6 are distinct objects when considered separately, but when they are considered collectively they form a single set of size three, written {2,4,6}. Sets are one of the most fundamental concepts in mathematics. Developed at the end of the 19th century, set theory is now a ubiquitous part of mathematics, and can be used as a foundation from which nearly all of mathematics can be derived. In mathematics education, elementary topics such as Venn diagrams are taught at a young age, while more advanced concepts are taught as part of a university degree. The German word Menge, rendered as "set" in English, was coined by Bernard Bolzano in his work The Paradoxes of the Infinite.

Set (deity)

Set or Seth (; also spelled Setesh, Sutekh, Setekh, or Suty) is a god of the desert, storms, disorder, violence and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion. In Ancient Greek, the god's name is given as Sēth (Σήθ). Set is not, however, a god to be ignored or avoided; he has a positive role where he is employed by Ra on his solar boat to repel the serpent of Chaos Apep. Set had a vital role as a reconciled combatant. He was lord of the red (desert) land where he was the balance to Horus' role as lord of the black (soil) land.

In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper who killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris. Osiris' wife Isis reassembled Osiris' corpse and resurrected him long enough to conceive his son and heir Horus. Horus sought revenge upon Set, and the myths describe their conflicts. This Osiris myth is a prominent theme in Egyptian mythology.

Set (abstract data type)

In computer science, a set is an abstract data type that can store certain values, without any particular order, and no repeated values. It is a computer implementation of the mathematical concept of a finite set. Unlike most other collection types, rather than retrieving a specific element from a set, one typically tests a value for membership in a set.

Some set data structures are designed for static or frozen sets that do not change after they are constructed. Static sets allow only query operations on their elements — such as checking whether a given value is in the set, or enumerating the values in some arbitrary order. Other variants, called dynamic or mutable sets, allow also the insertion and deletion of elements from the set.

An abstract data structure is a collection, or aggregate, of data. The data may be booleans, numbers, characters, or other data structures. If one considers the structure yielded by packaging or indexing, there are four basic data structures:

  1. unpackaged, unindexed: bunch
  2. packaged, unindexed: set
  3. unpackaged, indexed: string ( sequence)
  4. packaged, indexed: list ( array)

In this view, the contents of a set are a bunch, and isolated data items are elementary bunches (elements). Whereas sets contain elements, bunches consist of elements.

Further structuring may be achieved by considering the multiplicity of elements (sets become multisets, bunches become hyperbunches) or their homogeneity (a record is a set of fields, not necessarily all of the same type).

Set (music)

A set (pitch set, pitch-class set, set class, set form, set genus, pitch collection) in music theory, as in mathematics and general parlance, is a collection of objects. In musical contexts the term is traditionally applied most often to collections of pitches or pitch-classes, but theorists have extended its use to other types of musical entities, so that one may speak of sets of durations or timbres, for example.

A set by itself does not necessarily possess any additional structure, such as an ordering. Nevertheless, it is often musically important to consider sets that are equipped with an order relation (called segments); in such contexts, bare sets are often referred to as "unordered", for the sake of emphasis.

Two-element sets are called dyads, three-element sets trichords (occasionally "triads", though this is easily confused with the traditional meaning of the word triad). Sets of higher cardinalities are called tetrachords (or tetrads), pentachords (or pentads), hexachords (or hexads), heptachords (heptads or, sometimes, mixing Latin and Greek roots, "septachords"—e.g.,), octachords (octads), nonachords (nonads), decachords (decads), undecachords, and, finally, the dodecachord.

A time-point set is a duration set where the distance in time units between attack points, or time-points, is the distance in semitones between pitch classes.

Set (Thompson Twins album)

Set is the second album by the English pop group Thompson Twins. Released in February 1982, it was the second album they recorded for their own T Records imprint, which was released by Arista Records/Hansa.

Compared to their first album, A Product of ... (Participation), Set featured a more polished sound thanks to producer Steve Lillywhite. With their ever-shifting line-up, the Thompson Twins had now swelled to seven members, adding Matthew Seligman on bass guitar to free up Tom Bailey for full frontman duties and keyboards. Former sax player Jane Shorter was replaced by Alannah Currie, who was Bailey's girlfriend at the time (they later married and remained together until 2004). Three of the songs featured on Set do not feature Bailey on lead vocals, but are sung by Joe Leeway. While not an official member of the band, Thomas Dolby was also on hand to play additional keyboards on three tracks.

While the album was given praise by critics, the band found themselves on the verge of yet another personnel change. The track " In the Name of Love" was written by Bailey simply as album filler, but was ultimately chosen as the lead single from the album. While failing to make the UK pop charts, the single was released in the United States as a club single and went to number one on Billboard magazine's dance chart, where it remained unseated for five weeks (from 22 May – 19 June 1982).

The success of the track opened many doors for the band, who suddenly had the potential to be more than just an underground sensation. Together with the band's manager, John Hade, Bailey then reinvented the band as a trio, keeping Currie and Leeway while firing the others.

In the UK, a limited number of copies of the album were released with a free single which featured the tracks "Squares and Triangles", "Weather Station", and "Modern Plumbing".

Set was also released in the United States on the Arista label as In the Name of Love, which saw three of the album's tracks replaced by two songs from the band's first album, A Product of ... (Participation).

In September 2008, A Product of ... (Participation) and Set were re-released as a double-CD set. Each disc included early singles, non-album tracks, and extended remixes.

Set (psychology)

In psychology, a set is a group of expectations that shape experience by making people especially sensitive to specific kinds of information. A perceptual set, also called perceptual expectancy, is a predisposition to perceive things in a certain way. Perceptual sets occur in all the different senses. They can be long term, such as a special sensitivity to hearing one's own name in a crowded room, or short term, as in the ease with which hungry people notice the smell of food. A mental set is a framework for thinking about a problem. It can be shaped by habit or by desire. Mental sets can make it easy to solve a class of problem, but attachment to the wrong mental set can inhibit problem-solving and creativity.

Wiktionary

set

Etymology 1

  1. fixed in position. n. 1 A punch for setting nails in wood. 2 A device for receiving broadcast radio waves (or, more recently, broadcast data); a radio or television. 3 (alt form sett English): a hole made and lived in by a badger. 4 (alt form sett English): pattern of threads and yarns. 5 (alt form sett English): piece of quarried stone. 6 (context horticulture English) A small tuber or bulb used instead of seed, particularly onion sets and potato sets. 7 The amount the teeth of a saw protrude to the side in order to create the kerf. 8 (context obsolete rare English) That which is staked; a wager; hence, a gambling game. 9 (context engineering English) Permanent change of shape caused by excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc. 10 (context piledriving English) A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot otherwise be reached by the weight, or hammer. 11 (context printing dated English) The width of the body of a type. 12 A young oyster when first attached. 13 Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality. 14 A series or group of something. (''Note the similar meaning in #Noun_2'') 15 (cx colloquial English) The manner, state, or quality of setting or fitting; fit. 16 The camber of a curved roofing tile. v

  2. 1 (context transitive English) To put (something) down, to rest. 2 (context transitive English) To attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place. 3 (context transitive English) To put in a specified condition or state; to cause to be. 4 (context transitive dated English) To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fasten to a spot. 5 (context transitive English) To determine or settle. 6 (context transitive English) To adjust. 7 (context transitive English) To punch (a nail) into wood so that its head is below the surface. 8 (context transitive English) To arrange with dishes and cutlery. 9 (context transitive English) To introduce or describe. 10 (context transitive English) To locate (a play, et

  3. ); to assign a backdrop to. 11 (context transitive English) To compile, to make (a puzzle or challenge). 12 (context transitive English) To prepare (a stage or film set). 13 (context transitive English) To fit (someone) up in a situation. 14 (context transitive English) To arrange (type). 15 (context transitive English) To devise and assign (work) to. Etymology 2

    n. 1 A young plant fit for setting out; a slip; shoot. 2 A rudimentary fruit. 3 The setting of the sun or other luminary; (context by extension English) the close of the day. 4 (context literally and figuratively English) General movement; direction; drift; tendency. 5 A matching collection of similar things. (''Note the similar meaning in #Noun'') 6 A collection of various objects for a particular purpose. 7 An object made up of several parts. 8 (context set theory English) A collection of zero or more objects, possibly infinite in size, and disregarding any order or repetition of the objects which may be contained within it. 9 (context in plural, “sets” mathematics informal English) set theory. 10 A group of people, usually meeting socially. 11 The scenery for a film or play. 12 (context dance English) The initial or basic formation of dancers. 13 (context exercise English) A group of repetitions of a single exercise performed one after the other without rest. 14 (context tennis English) A complete series of games, forming part of a match. 15 (context volleyball English) A complete series of points, forming part of a match. 16 (context volleyball English) The act of directing the ball to a teammate for an attack. 17 (context music English) A musical performance by a band, disc jockey, etc., consisting of several musical pieces. 18 (context music English) A drum kit, a drum set. 19 (context UK education English) A class group in a subject where pupils are divided by ability. 20 (context poker slang English) three of a kind in poker. In http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/community%20card%20poker games, the term is usually reserved for a situation in which a pair in a player's hand is matched by a single card on the boar

  4. Compare with ''trips''. Weisenberg, Michael (2000) ''[http://www.poker1.com/mcu/pokerdictionary/mculib_dictionary_info.asp The Official Dictionary of Poker].'' MGI/Mike Caro University. ISBN 978-1880069523 vb. (cx UK education English) To divide a class group in a subject according to ability

WordNet

set

  1. adj. (usually followed by `to' or `for') on the point of or strongly disposed; "in no fit state to continue"; "fit to drop"; "laughing fit to burst"; "she was fit to scream"; "primed for a fight"; "we are set to go at any time" [syn: fit(p), primed(p), set(p)]

  2. fixed and unmoving; "with eyes set in a fixed glassy stare"; "his bearded face already has a set hollow look"- Connor Cruise O'Brien; "a face rigid with pain" [syn: fixed, rigid]

  3. situated in a particular spot or position; "valuable centrally located urban land"; "strategically placed artillery"; "a house set on a hilltop"; "nicely situated on a quiet riverbank" [syn: located, placed, situated]

  4. set down according to a plan:"a carefully laid table with places set for four people"; "stones laid in a pattern" [syn: laid]

  5. being below the horizon; "the moon is set" [syn: set(p)]

  6. determined or decided upon as by an authority; "date and place are already determined"; "the dictated terms of surrender"; "the time set for the launching" [syn: determined, dictated]

  7. converted to solid form (as concrete) [syn: hardened]

  8. [also: setting]

set

  1. n. a group of things of the same kind that belong together and are so used; "a set of books"; "a set of golf clubs"; "a set of teeth"

  2. (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"

  3. several exercises intended to be done in series; "he did four sets of the incline bench press" [syn: exercise set]

  4. representation consisting of the scenery and other properties used to identify the location of a dramatic production; "the sets were meticulously authentic" [syn: stage set]

  5. an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot" [syn: circle, band, lot]

  6. a relatively permanent inclination to react in a particular way; "the set of his mind was obvious" [syn: bent]

  7. the act of putting something in position; "he gave a final set to his hat"

  8. a unit of play in tennis or squash; "they played two sets of tennis after dinner"

  9. the process of becoming hard or solid by cooling or drying or crystallization; "the hardening of concrete"; "he tested the set of the glue" [syn: hardening, solidifying, solidification, curing]

  10. evil beast-headed Egyptian god with high square ears and a long snout; brother and murderer of Osiris [syn: Seth]

  11. the descent of a heavenly body below the horizon; "before the set of sun"

  12. (psychology) a temporary readiness to respond in a particular way; "the subjects' set led them to solve problems the familiar way and to overlook the simpler solution"; "his instructions deliberately gave them the wrong set" [syn: readiness]

  13. any electronic equipment that receives or transmits radio or tv signals; "the early sets ran on storage batteries"

  14. [also: setting]

set

  1. v. put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point" [syn: put, place, pose, position, lay]

  2. fix conclusively or authoritatively; "set the rules" [syn: determine]

  3. decide upon or fix definitely; "fix the variables"; "specify the parameters" [syn: specify, determine, fix, limit]

  4. establish as the highest level or best performance; "set a record" [syn: mark]

  5. put into a certain state; cause to be in a certain state; "set the house afire"

  6. fix in a border; "The goldsmith set the diamond"

  7. make ready or suitable or equip in advance for a particular purpose or for some use, event, etc; "Get the children ready for school!"; "prepare for war"; "I was fixing to leave town after I paid the hotel bill" [syn: fix, prepare, set up, ready, gear up]

  8. set to a certain position or cause to operate correctly; "set clocks or instruments"

  9. locate; "The film is set in Africa" [syn: localize, localise, place]

  10. disappear beyond the horizon; "the sun sets early these days" [syn: go down, go under] [ant: rise]

  11. adapt for performance in a different way; "set this poem to music" [syn: arrange]

  12. put or set (seeds or seedlings) into the ground; "Let's plant flowers in the garden" [syn: plant]

  13. apply or start; "set fire to a building"

  14. become gelatinous; "the liquid jelled after we added the enzyme" [syn: jell, congeal]

  15. put into a position that will restore a normal state; "set a broken bone"

  16. insert (a nail or screw below the surface, as into a countersink) [syn: countersink]

  17. give a fine, sharp edge to a knife or razor

  18. urge a dog to attack someone [syn: sic]

  19. estimate; "We put the time of arrival at 8 P.M." [syn: place, put]

  20. equip with sails, masts, etc.; "rig a ship" [syn: rig, set up]

  21. get ready for a particular purpose or event; "set up an experiment"; "set the table"; "lay out the tools for the surgery" [syn: set up, lay out]

  22. alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard; "Adjust the clock, please"; "correct the alignment of the front wheels" [syn: adjust, correct]

  23. bear fruit; "the apple trees fructify" [syn: fructify]

  24. arrange attractively; "dress my hair for the wedding" [syn: dress, arrange, do, coif, coiffe, coiffure]

  25. [also: setting]

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

Set

Egyptian god, from Greek Seth, from Egyptian Setesh.

set

"fixed," c.1200, sett, past participle of setten "to set" (see set (v.)). Meaning "ready, prepared" first recorded 1844.

set

Old English settan (transitive) "cause to sit, put in some place, fix firmly; build, found; appoint, assign," from Proto-Germanic *(bi)satjan "to cause to sit, set" (cognates: Old Norse setja, Swedish sätta, Old Saxon settian, Old Frisian setta, Dutch zetten, German setzen, Gothic satjan), causative form of PIE *sod-, variant of *sed- (1) "to sit" (see sit (v.)). Also see set (n.2).\n

\nIntransitive sense from c.1200, "be seated." Used in many disparate senses by Middle English; sense of "make or cause to do, act, or be; start" and that of "mount a gemstone" attested by mid-13c. Confused with sit since early 14c. Of the sun, moon, etc., "to go down," recorded from c.1300, perhaps from similar use of the cognates in Scandinavian languages. To set (something) on "incite to attack" (c.1300) originally was in reference to hounds and game.

set

"collection of things," mid-15c., from Old French sette "sequence," variant of secte "religious community," from Medieval Latin secta "retinue," from Latin secta "a following" (see sect). "[I]n subsequent developments of meaning influenced by SET v.1 and apprehended as equivalent to 'number set together'" [OED]. The noun set was in Middle English, but only in the sense of "religious sect" (late 14c.), which likely is the direct source of some modern meanings, such as "group of persons with shared status, habits, etc." (1680s).\n

\nMeaning "complete collection of pieces" is from 1680s. Meaning "group of pieces musicians perform at a club during 45 minutes" (more or less) is from c.1925, though it is found in a similar sense in 1580s. Set piece is from 1846 as "grouping of people in a work of visual art;" from 1932 in reference to literary works.

set

"act of setting; condition of being set" (of a heavenly body), mid-14c., from set (v.) or its identical past participle. Many disparate senses collect under this word because of the far-flung meanings assigned to the verb: \n

"Action of hardening," 1837; also "manner or position in which something is set" (1530s), hence "general movement, direction, tendency" (1560s); "build, form" (1610s), hence "bearing, carriage" (1855); "action of fixing the hair in a particular style" (1933).\n

\n"Something that has been set" (1510s), hence the use in tennis (1570s) and the theatrical meaning "scenery for an individual scene in a play, etc.," recorded from 1859. Other meanings OED groups under "miscellaneous technical senses" include "piece of electrical apparatus" (1891, first in telegraphy); "burrow of a badger" (1898). Old English had set "seat," in plural "camp; stable," but OED finds it "doubtful whether this survived beyond OE." Compare set (n.1).\n

\nSet (n.1) and set (n.2) are not always distinguished in dictionaries; OED has them as two entries, Century Dictionary as one. The difference of opinion seems to be whether the set meaning "group, grouping" (here (n.2)) is a borrowing of the unrelated French word that sounds like the native English one, or a borrowing of the sense only, which was absorbed into the English word.

Usage examples of "set".

UNMIK, with European Union assistance, did intervene - in setting up institutions and abetting economic legislation - it has done more harm than good.

Since Bull Shockhead would bury his brother, and lord Ralph would seek the damsel, and whereas there is water anigh, and the sun is well nigh set, let us pitch our tents and abide here till morning, and let night bring counsel unto some of us.

But now hold up thine heart, and keep close for these two days that we shall yet abide in Tower Dale: and trust me this very evening I shall begin to set tidings going that shall work and grow, and shall one day rejoice thine heart.

Notary take care to set it down that the said abjuration was made by one gravely suspected of heresy, so that if she should be proved to have relapsed, she should then be judged accordingly and delivered up to the secular Court.

He did manage to use his fire magic on a few of them, setting their shirts and hair ablaze, and that forced the rest to reconsider their attack for a time.

It bore both the rich aroma of leaves being burnt in the fall and the faint perfume of wildflowers ablow in the spring, but it also held a third attar which seemed to be the breath of the Wind itself which none could ever set name to.

Channa, the ablutions system was not completely set up and the perfume mixer not installed.

He stopped pacing when he heard the whistles, set to welcome the general aboard with a salute that accorded with his rank.

Before he could abscond to the police station, Farrokh felt obliged to set a trap for Mr Garg.

Unless I set my will, unless I absolve myself from the rhythm of life, fix myself and remain static, cut off from living, absolved within my own will.

Pots of stalky geraniums were set about, scarcely redeeming the place, which stank of the gamy stew, a cauldron of which sat abubble somewhere.

The negotiator worked to isolate the suspect while at the same time setting himself in a position to wait, psychologically starving out the individual, as here, where Abies had effectively been placed under house arrest.

Banish set aside the sheaf of papers then, and Blood saw photographs underneath, grade school portraits of the Abies children.

Banish weighed briefly the prospect of trying to get Abies back on the line, then dismissed it and set down the handset.

Mason conducted Floyt over to a terminal that was set up for a human accessor, behind stacks of peripherals and other equipment.