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Crossword clues for mark

Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
mark
I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ceremony marks sth
▪ a ceremony marking the beginning of adulthood
a distinct/marked/conspicuous lack of sth (=very noticeable)
▪ She looked at him with a marked lack of enthusiasm.
a marked preference (=strong and clear)
▪ The animals have a marked preference for woodland.
a marked reduction (=very easy to notice)
▪ There has been a marked reduction in arrests since the ban on alcohol at stadiums.
a marked tendency (=noticeable)
▪ There is a marked tendency for Hollywood marriages to end in divorce.
a marked/dramatic difference (=very noticeable)
▪ There was a marked difference between the two sets of results.
a marked/noticeable improvement (=that people can notice)
▪ Joanna's work showed a marked improvement.
a marked/striking contrast (=very noticeable)
▪ I noticed a marked contrast in his behaviour before and after treatment.
a remarkable/striking/marked similarity (=one that is very noticeable)
▪ This ape's facial expressions show remarkable similarities to ours.
a sharp/dramatic/marked drop in sth
▪ The results showed a sharp drop in profits.
a significant/marked shift (=big and noticeable)
▪ There has been a significant shift in government policy on education.
as a mark of respect (=as a sign of respect, especially for someone who has just died)
▪ Flags were flown at half mast as a mark of respect for the dead seamen.
be marked on a map (=put a mark or symbol on a map to show where something is)
▪ The path is clearly marked on the map.
beauty mark
be/mark the end of an era (=be the end of a period of time in history that is known for a particular event, or for particular qualities)
▪ The principal’s death marked the end of an era at the college.
bite marks
▪ Her body was covered in bite marks.
burn marks
▪ The desk was covered with graffiti and burn marks.
celebrate/commemorate/mark an event (=do something to show that you remember it)
▪ Fans observed a minute’s silence to commemorate the tragic event.
Charter mark
distinguishing feature/mark/characteristic
▪ The main distinguishing feature of this species is the leaf shape.
exam marks
▪ Pupils were divided into classes with a similar range of ability, based on their previous exam marks.
examination marks
▪ On average, girls achieved higher examination marks that boys.
exclamation mark
fall short of the mark (=are not good enough)
▪ One or two songs on the album are interesting, but most fall short of the mark.
full marks
▪ Not the most stylish mobile, but full marks to Marconi for originality.
high water mark
▪ the high water mark of Herrera’s presidency
hit the...mark
▪ Sales have hit the 1 million mark.
leave a mark/stain/scar etc
▪ The wine had left a permanent mark on the tablecloth.
low water mark
make a hole/dent/mark etc
▪ Make a hole in the paper.
▪ The cup has made a mark on the table.
mark a grave
▪ The stone marked the grave of their young daughter.
mark a high/low/turning etc point (=be or happen at a particular time in the development of something)
▪ The day of the accident marked a turning point in Kenny’s life.
mark a stage
▪ The election marks an important stage in the rebuilding of the country.
mark an essayBritish English, grade an essay AmE:
▪ I went home knowing that I still had a pile of essays to mark.
mark an occasion (=do something special to celebrate an event)
▪ The bells were rung to mark the occasion.
mark the beginning of sth (also signal/herald the beginning of sth) (= show that something is starting to happen)
▪ This event marked the beginning of a ten-year worldwide depression.
mark the climax of sth (=show that something has reached its best point)
▪ This painting marked the climax of his career.
mark the onset of sth
▪ The tradition originates from an old Celtic feast marking the onset of winter.
marked reluctance (=great and noticeable)
▪ People showed a marked reluctance to accept that the situation was serious.
marked (=very noticeable)
▪ Hunting led to a marked decline in bird numbers.
marked (=very noticeable)
▪ There was a marked change in his behaviour.
mark/form a boundary
▪ The river Jordan marks the boundary between Israel and Jordan.
mark/represent a shift
▪ The idea represents a dramatic shift in health care policy.
On your marks – get set – go (=said to start a race)
On your marks – get set – go.
pass mark (=the mark you need to be successful)
▪ The pass mark is 55%.
passed the...mark
▪ The number of unemployed has passed the two million mark for the first time.
punctuation mark
question mark
▪ A big question mark hangs over the company’s future.
quotation mark
scorch marks
▪ There were scorch marks on the kitchen worktop where a hot pan had been placed.
significant/marked (=definite and noticeable)
▪ Over the last few years, there has been a marked increase in tourism to developing countries.
significant/substantial/marked (=quite big)
▪ Global warming could have a significant effect on agriculture in many parts of the world.
skid mark
▪ There were skid marks on the road where the crash occurred.
speech marks
stress mark
stretch mark
the halfway stage/mark/point
▪ They’ve just reached the halfway stage of the project.
token/mark of sb’s esteem (=a sign of their respect)
▪ Please accept the small gift we enclose as a mark of our esteem.
tyre marks (also tyre tracks) (= marks left by tyres)
▪ There were tire marks on the road close to where the crash happened.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
big
▪ Ready for action A big question mark hangs over the wisdom of visiting any Arab state at present, writes Mike Harper.
▪ Another big question mark: How vigorously will the local phone companies defend their turf?
▪ Her husband says she has a big mark across her throat from the rope.
▪ The biggest question mark over Major out of the row is how the Government got into this mess in the first place.
▪ Defense and goalie are the biggest question marks.
▪ Many of these leave a very big question mark as to their eternal significance.
▪ But there's a big question mark over whether they could afford to keep him in the Third Division.
black
▪ The former Shah's advocacy of a collective security pact was a further black mark against the Gulf scheme.
▪ Still, you could almost see the black mark being registered against the name of the man who had asked the question.
▪ A mini-breakdown was less of a black mark than a criminal record if he should ever choose to emigrate.
▪ They reduced his manuscript to a patchwork of black marks.
▪ Irina had put a black mark against him with Rakovsky.
▪ But there is one black mark.
▪ Why is not immediately obvious but sufficiently worrying to put a black mark against the program.
▪ You get a black mark next to your name that may show up in your next evaluation.
deutsche
▪ Sterling was weaker against the deutsche mark at 2. 2354 marks compared with 2. 2390 at the previous close.
▪ The benchmark five-year deutsche mark swap spread fell 1 basis point to 45 basis points.
▪ Bayer shares fell 1 deutsche mark to 404.
▪ The benchmark five-year deutsche mark swap spread rose 2 basis points to 47 basis points.
▪ The dollar was also lower against the deutsche mark.
full
▪ None of them got full marks.
▪ And then, you have a pitching staff that is full of question marks.
▪ So full marks to Lord Ridley for injecting some fun into last week's gathering of Northern Rock investors.
▪ Well, full marks for courage, Major.
▪ Well done Ralph, and full marks Henry.
▪ Not a parasite Overall assessment: Full marks for background, education, appearance.
▪ She was thinking: Full marks to Roberta.
▪ You had to give the woman full marks for persistence.
high
▪ This was the high water mark of Elf culture when most of their greatest works of art were created.
▪ She also gives high marks to manager Dusty Baker.
▪ Emma, who presently works in corporate finance, was awarded the IoT medal and Butterworth prize for the highest overall marks.
▪ Newhome sales were slightly below the high marks of the late 1970s.
▪ Overall, only two out of three supermarkets, one in three delicatessens and one in five butchers scored high marks for hygiene.
▪ No wonder he then passed with very high marks.
▪ Restencourt did seven triples, including two triple axels, and received higher technical marks than Weir.
low
▪ The class with the lowest mark would be excluded from story time.
▪ Warren, who had been given excellent evaluations two months before his report, was subsequently given low marks and denied promotion.
▪ Below low water mark, predation by lobsters may be significant.
▪ It is sometimes represented in transcription with a low mark so that the examples could be transcribed as,.
quick
▪ Salad crops, however, are quick off the mark.
red
▪ You can be left with a red mark a couple of inches across that takes days to fade.
▪ The spectacles left bright red marks which took some time to go away.
▪ Even at this distance you could see that huge red mark across his cheek.
▪ The first is a surface sore which starts off as a red mark.
▪ There was a brutal, red thumb mark just at the point where her shoulders met her neck.
▪ Note, on the protection strip, you have red marks - - - -.
▪ She shrieked at the sting of the blows, which left a red mark down one side of her face.
▪ Its nail was a rose thorn; she allowed it to scratch at her skin, making a faint red mark.
short
▪ When it comes to the expected sporty performance and handling, the Paseo again falls short of the mark.
▪ However, it falls short of the mark of providing the needed discussion of analytical biochemical problems.
top
▪ This means that a few get top marks, a big bunch get middling marks, and a few come near the bottom.
▪ But first harness, tack and carriages had to be spruced up to ensure top marks for turnout.
▪ You had to give Anthony top marks for persistence, she thought to herself.
▪ She scored top marks, and received the Lord Wolfenden prize for outstanding academic performance.
▪ I have to give you top marks for determination.
▪ We also gave it top marks for looks.
wide
▪ Another is that the view of October as the product of a truly mass-revolutionary movement is not so wide of the mark.
▪ No, Watson, that is well wide of the mark even for you.
▪ The report offers no explanation for our figures being wide of the mark.
▪ Housing committee chairman Bill Dixon said Coun Richmond was wide of the mark and each property would only cost £30,000.
▪ Few forecasts have been so wide of the mark.
▪ Shock tactics often fall wide of their mark.
▪ Jean Powers was not so wide of the mark.
■ NOUN
exclamation
▪ And I mean that exclamation mark.
▪ Then exclamation marks abound, and she uses verbs in the imperative to heighten the drama of her warning to humanity.
▪ But those rather racy exclamation marks are a surprise.
▪ It was too easy to be silly and goofy and laugh and use exclamation marks.
▪ Over the Easter term, the inky tadpoles changed from commas into exclamation marks.
▪ Wind brings a dandelion drift of exclamation marks, and the thrush types an against a stone.
▪ One is the exclamation mark, used twice.
gas
▪ The heat in Keegan's kitchen barely rose above gas mark one.
▪ Place on a baking tray and bake in an oven at 425°F, 220°C or Gas mark 7 for approximately 1 hour.
▪ Place pan in a preheated hot oven 200 °C gas mark 6.
▪ Return pan to oven and increase heat to 220 °C gas mark 7.
pass
▪ It is not a pass mark and yet all children are supposed to aspire to it.
▪ Instead, the pass mark was set higher for girls!
▪ For example, what pass mark would they set for an examination they are about to sit?
▪ How would students react to you setting a pass mark of say 80%?
punctuation
▪ Rather it was a fiery punctuation mark, a coal-like comma, or salamander semicolon, in a continuing story.
▪ Hyphens Hyphens, perhaps the most creative punctuation marks, join two or more words to create a single word.
▪ The recognition system was also extended to allow punctuation marks, digits and other non-alphabetic characters in certain situations.
▪ Baghdad's Babil daily put the punctuation marks above published excerpts from a U.S.
▪ He snorted quietly: an unemotional noise; a punctuation mark.
▪ Most people make mistakes, especially with punctuation marks.
▪ Each punctuation mark is put into a flashing mode, and another graphic character replaces each word.
▪ In addition, the program tallies the number of punctuation marks and calculates the average space between them.
question
▪ Suddenly question marks hung over her head.
▪ Another big question mark: How vigorously will the local phone companies defend their turf?
▪ One of the keys dispensed with was the question mark.
▪ She drew the first question mark.
▪ He says obviously there's now a question mark over his future.
▪ Then the disk drive whirred once more and the question mark evaporated.
▪ Many of these leave a very big question mark as to their eternal significance.
▪ Defense and goalie are the biggest question marks.
quotation
▪ Now, though, the irony is wearing off; they don't even bother to put their antics in quotation marks.
▪ I might also comment that she seemed to know what the quotation marks represented on the page.
▪ At first the international press used it ironically, in quotation marks.
▪ Finally, quotes, simply by being embraced by quotation marks or set in italics, will attract your readers.
▪ These are lives lived wholly within quotation marks, and the references are mostly Henry James.
▪ For example, if we teach a child quotation marks, the child will sprinkle them liberally throughout every story.
▪ Her tone changes in response to quotation marks, and her spacing matches the length of pages, sentences, and words.
▪ When a quotation is followed by an attributive phrase, the comma is enclosed within the quotation marks.
skid
▪ The skid marks were evident on the last 750 feet of runway travel.
▪ On the concrete floor inside are tire tracks, and skid marks where kids have done wheelies or donuts.
trade
▪ A company's name must not include a trade mark unless its owner's consent is obtained.
▪ To this day, its trade mark has been the concentration on the body and its movements.
▪ We will introduce legislation to simplify trade mark registration and extend the rights they confer.
water
▪ But it was a misreading to suppose that the vote then marked the high water mark on the issue.
▪ This was the high water mark of Elf culture when most of their greatest works of art were created.
▪ Below low water mark, predation by lobsters may be significant.
▪ It would provide the maximum area of water within the engineering constraints and would be broadly equivalent to mean high water mark.
▪ I found what I took to be high water mark with my feet rather than my eyes.
■ VERB
bear
▪ A large piece of whale blubber, bearing the marks of fleshing knives, has been discovered off west Falkland.
▪ The imam still bore the mark of that experience in his gaunt frame and sallow, jaundiced complexion.
▪ The great Leinster dinner service of 1747 was his swansong: no silver bearing his mark appears thereafter.
▪ Products graded in accordance with established standards bear the appropriate grade marks.
▪ And her body, bearing one tiny mark, had been found with a bird's head, near the barrow.
▪ Krupat's face, which I knew so well, bore some recent marks.
▪ Some of you have the look of lords, yet you bear the mark of hard travelling and your steeds are scarred.
▪ None the less, nationalization still bore the mark of long struggles by the labour movement to further working class interests.
fall
▪ When it comes to the expected sporty performance and handling, the Paseo again falls short of the mark.
▪ Bayer shares fell 1 deutsche mark to 404.
▪ Shock tactics often fall wide of their mark.
▪ However, it falls short of the mark of providing the needed discussion of analytical biochemical problems.
give
▪ You choose a monday paper which gives marks out of 10.
▪ A place is approached, sampled, and given a mark.
▪ You had to give the woman full marks for persistence.
▪ In a survey she took at the end of the term, the students gave themselves poor marks for class participation.
▪ She had to give him full marks for originality.
▪ Warren, who had been given excellent evaluations two months before his report, was subsequently given low marks and denied promotion.
▪ Oh, some of the priests said you got given marks afterwards, but what was the point of that?
▪ Only 19 percent of the respondents gave lawyers high marks for maintaining honest and ethical standards.
hit
▪ In any book of several hundred pages you're bound to hit the mark occasionally.
▪ The first time I saw him hit from the farthest mark, I cheered.
▪ Had the muddy weed really hit its mark?
▪ If one of us hits the half-century mark, we all do.
▪ Today I have to hit as many marks as possible, and Dixie can find them fast.
▪ Not every story hits the mark.
▪ It took five years for revenue to hit the £1 million mark.
▪ About half hit the comic mark.
leave
▪ But it left it's mark.
▪ Stagflation and the threat of deeper world recession has left marks upon the consciousness of the workers.
▪ Velvet Pin as little as possible as pins tend to leave marks.
▪ Eager to work and leave their mark, the Volunteers seethed at the phlegmatic nature of the program.
▪ The drip, drip of winter skis propped up outside rooms have left their their sallow mark.
▪ The disturbing images, however, have left a mark.
▪ The modern period has left its mark too, literally.
▪ He left few marks in the annals of economic discipline.
make
▪ He made his greater mark as a cricket administrator.
▪ Everyone likes to make their mark.
▪ It was as a policeman that he made his mark.
▪ Billionaire Marvin Davis made his deal-making mark in oil and Hollywood.
▪ Mark the floor, walls and ceiling, making sure that wall marks are truly vertical.
▪ In some years, he has made up for losing marks in the regular season by increasing his bets in the playoffs.
▪ Eva continued to make her own personal mark.
▪ Its competition made their marks by being faster and easier to use.
miss
▪ The bundled software, aimed at children, missed its mark.
▪ As a welfare program, the minimum wage misses the mark because it worsens the status of the most disadvantaged youths.
▪ In your recent coverage of Novell's letter of intent to purchase Unix System Laboratories you've really missed the mark.
▪ The movie itself simply misses the mark.
▪ But, put like this, the objection misses its mark.
▪ All too often, national political coverage misses the mark.
▪ In the electronic community, these efforts will either fall short or miss the mark entirely.
▪ But the show missed the mark on other aspects of police work, the group said.
overstep
▪ The preacher overstepped the mark when he called the Royal Mail to a halt on the moor near Bagshot.
▪ Helen shrugged; she felt mildly embarrassed, as if she had overstepped the mark.
▪ In either case an agent trying to influence Fontaine may have overstepped the mark.
▪ In each painting a conjurer has overstepped his mark.
put
▪ I got ta put my mark on you.
▪ Irina had put a black mark against him with Rakovsky.
▪ Baghdad's Babil daily put the punctuation marks above published excerpts from a U.S.
▪ Why is not immediately obvious but sufficiently worrying to put a black mark against the program.
▪ Then measure 6 feet from the string along the house, and put a mark there.
▪ Mr Lamont has also put his mark on Tory budgets for the next three years, regardless of whether he remains Chancellor.
▪ But then along came some one like Lucas, and put the mark of Cain on everybody.
reach
▪ Today, hit shows are lucky to reach the 10 % mark, and even blockbusters fail to reach twice that.
▪ But on Feb. 20 he reached the century mark.
▪ The water had reached its mark and was lapping the grass that he stood on.
▪ The dollar could reach 1. 48 marks and 106 yen by the end of January, Cohen said.
▪ My confidence suffered so much that I failed to reach the 50-wicket mark in three successive County Championship campaigns with Middlesex.
▪ The Republicans have not reached their high-water mark in the South yet.
▪ Total moped sales are now reaching the 50,000 mark at 47,112, which is up 35.2 per cent on last year.
▪ As the countdown reaches the two-minute mark, the room seems to tremble.
set
▪ But if Hunt had now set his mark on the F1 scene and matured, at Team Hesketh matters were quite different.
▪ We can see where the plate and the chair were set, the marks are just visible on the floor.
▪ How would students react to you setting a pass mark of say 80%?
▪ Firms set prices as a mark up over average cost.
▪ He had set his mark on them.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a black mark (against sb)
▪ It is almost impossible to borrow money if you have any black marks against you.
▪ A mini-breakdown was less of a black mark than a criminal record if he should ever choose to emigrate.
▪ Incidentally, Willoughby, you've earned yourself a black mark for that little trouble.
▪ Irina had put a black mark against him with Rakovsky.
▪ It would be a good mark, not a black mark.
▪ The exam league tables have also been given a black mark by teaching unions.
▪ The outcome will be recorded but the finding does not constitute a black mark on the record of the officer involved.
▪ Why is not immediately obvious but sufficiently worrying to put a black mark against the program.
▪ You get a black mark next to your name that may show up in your next evaluation.
find its mark/target
▪ But now their enmity found its target in the flesh.
▪ I doubt whether it could have found its target but the very shape of it in my hands was reassuring.
▪ It found its mark; one of the suitors fell dying to the floor.
gas mark 4/5/6 etc
▪ Place pan in a preheated hot oven 200 °C gas mark 6.
marked man/woman
▪ But Chennault was a marked man.
▪ Ever since his luncheon with Katherine Fisher, Jim had felt like a marked man whenever he was in the office complex.
▪ From that time he was dedicated, a marked man.
▪ He thus became a marked man.
▪ In his defence, Souness believes his no-nonsense approach has made him a marked man.
▪ It was well known that the younger Beaumont twin was a marked man.
▪ Mark Gallagher - marked man today Much ado about nothing!
▪ Without Young, forward Andy Poppink is a marked man.
miss the mark
▪ All too often, national political coverage misses the mark.
▪ Although it contains a grain of truth, this theory rather radically misses the mark.
▪ As a welfare program, the minimum wage misses the mark because it worsens the status of the most disadvantaged youths.
▪ But the show missed the mark on other aspects of police work, the group said.
▪ In the electronic community, these efforts will either fall short or miss the mark entirely.
▪ In your recent coverage of Novell's letter of intent to purchase Unix System Laboratories you've really missed the mark.
▪ The movie itself simply misses the mark.
▪ The truth, however, is that most of the time it misses the mark.
overstep the mark
▪ Helen shrugged; she felt mildly embarrassed, as if she had overstepped the mark.
▪ In either case an agent trying to influence Fontaine may have overstepped the mark.
▪ The preacher overstepped the mark when he called the Royal Mail to a halt on the moor near Bagshot.
slow off the mark
▪ Diesels are condemned by some for being too slow off the mark.
▪ This time, they were slow off the mark.
telltale signs/marks etc
▪ Here are five telltale signs that the Ego is in command: 1.
▪ Then skim through your document for their telltale signs.
▪ Would we allow the police to search the sacred precincts of marital bedrooms for telltale signs of the use of contraceptives?
there is a question mark over sth/a question mark hangs over sth
wide of the mark
▪ Another is that the view of October as the product of a truly mass-revolutionary movement is not so wide of the mark.
▪ Few forecasts have been so wide of the mark.
▪ Housing committee chairman Bill Dixon said Coun Richmond was wide of the mark and each property would only cost £30,000.
▪ In answer to this, there are cases in which the notion of force feeding is very wide of the mark.
▪ Jean Powers was not so wide of the mark.
▪ No, Watson, that is well wide of the mark even for you.
▪ The report offers no explanation for our figures being wide of the mark.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ "What mark did you get?" "B."
▪ Check the power cord for any burn marks.
▪ Garvin had scratch marks on the side of her face.
▪ He had two little marks on his face where his glasses had been.
▪ His mark on the last test gave him a final average of 88%.
▪ His shoes had left dirt marks across the carpet.
▪ Hot cups of tea can make marks on polished tables.
▪ How did you get that dirty mark on your T-shirt?
▪ I don't think the tractor came this way - there are no tyre marks in the mud.
▪ I got full marks in the history test.
▪ Put a check mark beside each person's name as they come in.
▪ She came out with the second highest marks in the class.
▪ She squeezed me so hard, she left a mark on my arm.
▪ The tape left a mark on the paint.
▪ There are marks on the door where the cat has scratched it.
▪ There are marks on the tarmac where the car left the road.
▪ You have to do the course again if you get low marks.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ But first harness, tack and carriages had to be spruced up to ensure top marks for turnout.
▪ By the marks in the sand, it had been felled by a falcon, which made a meal of its flesh.
▪ Caught me bending was nearer the mark.
▪ During this third movement, an adagio, the land also developed stretch marks.
▪ He instantly made his mark with a series of books based on the classics.
▪ It would provide the maximum area of water within the engineering constraints and would be broadly equivalent to mean high water mark.
▪ Now, though, the irony is wearing off; they don't even bother to put their antics in quotation marks.
▪ The mark fell as low as 72. 41 yen.
II.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
clearly
▪ Look for details on delivery charges, they should be clearly marked in all ads.
▪ The radio controls are rather low in the center of the dash but are large and marked clearly enough.
▪ They are clearly marked on the map from the campsite.
▪ The text flowed into neat columns, with any excess clearly marked, ready to be moved to a jump page.
▪ The Daemonettes have the symbol of Slaanesh clearly marked on their foreheads.
▪ Trays are clearly marked with patient name and room number. 2.
▪ All books and possessions, should be clearly marked with the owner's name and class.
▪ In January, the teams finally ended their drawn-out discussions with a map that clearly marks the boundary.
particularly
▪ These patterns are particularly marked in the humanities and social sciences, where women are numerically stronger.
▪ The tendency of bureaucrats to take a dim view of whistle-blowers is particularly marked in the military.
▪ The lack of social contact between the predominantly local working class and the predominantly newcomer middle class can be particularly marked.
▪ The differences between authorities are particularly marked in the case of special education.
▪ The Godalming College entry was marked particularly high for clarity and student participation.
▪ There are two childhood memories that particularly marked her.
▪ This was particularly marked amongst the organized working class.
▪ This is particularly marked on the matter of the last major international crisis faced by this country, the Gulf war.
■ NOUN
anniversary
▪ Surely it would not have cost the council a fortune to mount a modest event to mark this anniversary.
▪ Residents had mixed feelings about marking the anniversary of the bombing of the federal building here.
▪ That was at the Ambassador's reception to mark the anniversary of the October Revolution.
beginning
▪ This date was adopted by various countries as marking the beginning of the year.
▪ The slight improvements in the eighteenth century are important because they mark the beginning of the downward trend.
▪ It marked the beginning of the London Stock Exchange and an international trading boom for Britain.
▪ The Gulf war could instead mark the beginning of a kind of Western perestroika.
▪ Vienne marked the beginning of the papacy's long exile in Avignon.
▪ However, 1983 also marked the beginning of severe destabilization.
▪ Puberty Puberty marks the biological beginning of adult life.
▪ It marked the beginning of Richard's association with Aquitaine.
boundary
▪ Like the Rhine it also marked a boundary for the Romans; beyond it - unknowable nomads!
▪ That point is marked by a sharp boundary known as the Mohorovicic discontinuity, or Moho.
▪ The horse would walk up that and that was how they marked the boundaries.
▪ In January, the teams finally ended their drawn-out discussions with a map that clearly marks the boundary.
▪ It marks the boundary of the parish of Langtom Matravers.
▪ The Bann marks the boundary between the diocese of Armagh and the diocese of Dromore.
▪ The magnetopause marks the inner boundary of the agitated region which itself is called the magnetosheath.
▪ These great trees that mark old boundaries are still deep in their dark phase.
card
▪ One problem which proved far greater than anticipated was where no option was marked on the screening card.
▪ She followed baseball and taught my brothers how to mark a score card.
▪ This is always an exciting time and I have tried to mark your card with ten horses to follow.
▪ Finally, you have to mark your card to show when to change colour.
▪ You mark the card when you want to start a new colour.
▪ She would then mark on the appropriate card the large task accomplished.
celebration
▪ One group of villagers are so delighted they're holding a celebration to mark the best harvest in years.
▪ The celebration marks a recognition by leaders here that the Navy is an important part of the community, said Rear Adm.
▪ Birmingham on 1 and 2 August 1838 saw a celebration to mark the end of apprenticeship.
▪ Weekend celebrations to mark the end of military rule had led to violent clashes between police and demonstrators.
▪ Kaskelot is one of the main features over a weekend of celebrations to mark 200 years of canals.
▪ She was fêted at celebrations to mark the Equal Franchise Act of 1928.
▪ It was all part of the celebrations to mark the three hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the outbreak of war.Elizabeth O'Reilly reports.
ceremony
▪ Possibly for ceremonies marking the annual seasons but no one can be sure.
▪ They would stay with the building until topping out, the traditional ceremony that marks the completion of the steel skeleton.
▪ A ceremony was held to mark the occasion and's widow is pictured planting the tree with managing director.
▪ The ceremonies will mark more the end of a process than its beginning.
▪ The wedding ceremony publicly marks the beginning of commitment to another through marriage.
change
▪ If that offer is serious, it will mark a radical change in policy.
▪ To hold otherwise would mark a drastic change in our understanding of the Constitution.
▪ The choice of land disposal marks a change of heart for Strathclyde's sewerage director, Prof Tom Anderson.
▪ Time can mark changes as it had with herself.
▪ The opening of the Springfield Works not only marked a change of base but also a change of direction for the company.
▪ Mundo de siete pozos marks a change of direction, but not a reversal of attitudes.
▪ The February attack could mark a change of tactics which will really threaten the regime if there is an escalation.
▪ That marked a change for the company based in the Chatsworth section of Los Angeles.
difference
▪ The debate was to mark a lasting difference between East and West.
▪ We were drawn together partly be-cause of, not in spite of, the marked differences in our personalities.
▪ The basic convention underlying all fiction marks its difference from fact.
▪ This isolation, like the isolation in terrestrial evolution, breeds variety and marked differences.
▪ Bands lack formal leaders, so there are no marked economic differences or disparities in status among their members.
▪ That is what marks the enormous valuational difference between organisms and persons.
▪ Perhaps this marks the single biggest difference between Marxist Socialism, and Empirical Socialism as it is now practised.
end
▪ Then, to mark the end of the service, three enormous thunder-flashes were let off in the rear gatehouse.
▪ The changes mark the end of an era for the long-embattled agency and for the institutions it helped.
▪ Motherhood replaced marriage as the occasion for leaving paid work and seldom marked the end of a woman's labour force membership.
▪ June 30 would mark the end of the triennial contract cycle that had punctuated labor-management relations in the copper industry since midcentury.
▪ Their arrival marked the end of policies that limited women to medical and musical units.
▪ That night, a torchlight procession through the city marked the end of the day.
▪ Its destruction marred the prince's reputation, and it marked the end of his military career.
▪ This appears to publicly mark a very belated end to an act of cultural vandalism that began nearly 60 years ago.
increase
▪ Book illustration is a field marked by sharp increases in price over the last two decades.
▪ The 1995 total marked the second annual increase in a row and exceeded five million for the first time in three years.
▪ The figures mark a tremendous increase in recycling, from one-in-two cans four years ago to today's rate of two-in-three.
▪ The depression of 1884 was marked by a large increase in the number of wedding rings pawned.
▪ Not all data on hip fractures show marked increases in winter.
▪ All are agreed that this escalation of the 36-year-long civil war will mean a marked increase in deaths.
map
▪ What are the names of the main cities marked on the map?
▪ The geologist records this by marking on a map the dip and strike of the beds wherever they outcrop.
▪ They are clearly marked on the map from the campsite.
▪ It was marked on a map dated 1648 and according to local reports was a working mill until 1900.
▪ An hour later they were halted in their tracks by a cataract not marked on the map.
▪ From an atlas find the names of the towns marked on the map as the more desirable dormitory towns.
▪ It is clearly marked on the map recommended for use with this, and the field guide.
▪ The track - optimistically marked on the map as Daleside Road - edged through a final gate and on to the road.
occasion
▪ To mark the occasion Newtownards mayor Wilbert Magill will be officiating at the ceremony.
▪ He marked the occasion with a quiet dinner with Brand and teammate Cuttino Mobley.
▪ Clwyd's Euro Week starts today with a special edition of Clwyd Connections published to mark the occasion by the county council.
▪ The following books are either now in stores or will soon be released to mark the occasion.
▪ The 1992 Richmond Meet is being marked as a historic occasion by having the first female Meet president.
▪ Y., wore her Sunday best, a floral dress, to mark the occasion.
▪ It seemed not to seek to impose itself but merely to mark the occasion.
▪ Thirty-three years on, his fans gathered there to mark the occasion, and Aileen Taylor was with them.
place
▪ In the adjoining Garden on the Ramparts stand two obelisks marking the place where the victims of the Defenestration fell in 1618.
▪ I never really marked off a place for myself within the family.
▪ The Subject is the category that marks the place that the individual must fill to be constituted as a subject.
▪ Error marks the place where education begins.
▪ The crosses in the pavement mark their place of execution.
▪ She keeps her finger marking her place in her book.
▪ Cut out the collage pieces and position them on the backing and mark their places lightly with a pencil.
▪ I mark the place where you are buried so that you will always find your way.
point
▪ Continue to the Bruce's Stone which commemorates the battle of 13-7 marking the turning point in Robert the Bruce's fortunes.
▪ It marked the point where the solid rock of the mantle changed into molten iron.
▪ Crises often mark turning points in overall patterns of policy development, because the consequences of alternative decisions can be momentous.
▪ Employment security is going through one of those fundamental redefinitions that marks a societal turning point.
▪ When you're happy with the layout, mark your starting point clearly on the floor, ready for the tiles.
▪ A megalith marks a convergence point of Icy lines.
▪ At any rate, Mary Leapor's friendship with Bridget Freemantle marks a turning point in her life.
▪ This fact is recorded on a building in Eastgate where a plaque marks the exact point of the Greenwich Meridian.
position
▪ It is a good idea to paint floorboards to mark the position of pipes and cables.
▪ Many writing on the mid-seventeenth century at present would legitimately claim that I have marked out these positions too exclusively.
▪ This screen is set to display embedded markers which mark the position of tabs, carriage returns and text attributes.
▪ Rehang the door, then mark the position on the door frame of the striker plate.
▪ In figure 4.19 V1 marks the position of Venus at launch.
▪ This comes in useful when the time comes to mark the position of the mortises.
▪ In either case, you will have to find the ceiling joists and mark their positions on the wall.
shift
▪ It was decisive, in that it was marked by a shift in the character of the student body.
▪ A border is a dividing line marking an abrupt shift between two separate, sometimes antagonistic, entities.
▪ And such changes mark a decisive shift away from local democracy.
▪ Between 1988 and 2000, the workforce will undergo a marked shift.
▪ The Act marks the most significant shift in direction of the education service since that of 1944.
▪ This specifically educational definition has of course continued, but its adoption by artists marks a significant shift.
▪ The move appears to mark a significant shift in Government policy.
▪ It marks a decisive shift on the part of the Sri Lankan government to sacrifice self-reliance for the possibility of increased foreign revenues.
speech
▪ Every profession has its in-group speech, which marks the professional and maintains solidarity.
▪ The speech marked Ventura's decision to withdraw into Minnesota politics following his unsuccessful flirtations with bigger ambitions.
▪ Flags at half-mast, commemorative wreaths, speeches and Solemn music marked the day.
spot
▪ Flowers yesterday marked the spot where Mr Reed died.
▪ And I marked out the spots.
▪ The slip knot should be marked with a spot of colour on the line.
▪ They marked the spots and checked to be sure the radios were working, then let the turtles go.
▪ Two stones, standing vertically, mark the spot.
▪ He returned the ball to the marked spot on the fairway and pulled a club from the bag.
▪ All that remained was the odd burnt-out farmhouse to mark the spot where civilisation had once existed.
▪ Pilots of the planes had planned to drop bouquets, funeral wreaths and a smoke flare to mark the spot.
stage
▪ Three poems mark the stages of this journey which is psychological as well as aesthetic.
▪ Today is particularly important because it marks the three-quarter stage of a very significant goal achievement.
▪ But such sentences can be seen as marking a stage in linguistic growth.
▪ It marks the half way stage in the itinerary and the half way stage in the narrative.
start
▪ For obvious reasons, laser beams or submerged fluorescent wires can not be used to mark the start line.
▪ At the foot of the park a rainbow of balloons marks the start of the parade.
▪ If any one date marks the start of the first Indochina war, it might be that day.
▪ It has proved to be a great success - and it marked the start of the Garrison revival.
▪ It also marked the start of a full-court press on the federal government.
▪ I have marked the start of my class definitions with a comment to help you locate the code.
▪ Tuesday, a groundbreaking ceremony at the bridge will mark the start of the first $ 35 million phase of the project.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
X marks the spot
a black mark (against sb)
▪ It is almost impossible to borrow money if you have any black marks against you.
▪ A mini-breakdown was less of a black mark than a criminal record if he should ever choose to emigrate.
▪ Incidentally, Willoughby, you've earned yourself a black mark for that little trouble.
▪ Irina had put a black mark against him with Rakovsky.
▪ It would be a good mark, not a black mark.
▪ The exam league tables have also been given a black mark by teaching unions.
▪ The outcome will be recorded but the finding does not constitute a black mark on the record of the officer involved.
▪ Why is not immediately obvious but sufficiently worrying to put a black mark against the program.
▪ You get a black mark next to your name that may show up in your next evaluation.
gas mark 4/5/6 etc
▪ Place pan in a preheated hot oven 200 °C gas mark 6.
marked man/woman
▪ But Chennault was a marked man.
▪ Ever since his luncheon with Katherine Fisher, Jim had felt like a marked man whenever he was in the office complex.
▪ From that time he was dedicated, a marked man.
▪ He thus became a marked man.
▪ In his defence, Souness believes his no-nonsense approach has made him a marked man.
▪ It was well known that the younger Beaumont twin was a marked man.
▪ Mark Gallagher - marked man today Much ado about nothing!
▪ Without Young, forward Andy Poppink is a marked man.
sb's card is marked
▪ Your card is marked, Jimbo.
slow off the mark
▪ Diesels are condemned by some for being too slow off the mark.
▪ This time, they were slow off the mark.
telltale signs/marks etc
▪ Here are five telltale signs that the Ego is in command: 1.
▪ Then skim through your document for their telltale signs.
▪ Would we allow the police to search the sacred precincts of marital bedrooms for telltale signs of the use of contraceptives?
there is a question mark over sth/a question mark hangs over sth
wide of the mark
▪ Another is that the view of October as the product of a truly mass-revolutionary movement is not so wide of the mark.
▪ Few forecasts have been so wide of the mark.
▪ Housing committee chairman Bill Dixon said Coun Richmond was wide of the mark and each property would only cost £30,000.
▪ In answer to this, there are cases in which the notion of force feeding is very wide of the mark.
▪ Jean Powers was not so wide of the mark.
▪ No, Watson, that is well wide of the mark even for you.
▪ The report offers no explanation for our figures being wide of the mark.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ A barbed wire fence marks the boundary between the two communities.
▪ A firework display was organized to mark the Queen's birthday.
▪ He had marked the route in red.
▪ He put a slip of paper in his book to mark his page.
▪ Her shoes marked the floor.
▪ I'll just mark the one I want in the catalog.
▪ It is a potentially fatal illness, marked by internal bleeding.
▪ Michael gave us a map of the city and marked some places of interest to visit.
▪ Mrs Parry, have you marked our tests yet?
▪ Put the lid on your pen so it doesn't mark the tablecloth.
▪ The album marks a change in Young's musical style.
▪ The celebration marked the 100th anniversary of the staging of the modern Olympic Games.
▪ The church marks the spot where St Peter died.
▪ The examiners who marked her A-level paper were very lenient and gave her a pass.
▪ The linoleum marks easily.
▪ The meeting was marked by bitter exchanges between the two sides.
▪ This year marks the company's 50th anniversary.
▪ Two shiny bronze plaques marked the former entrance to the palace.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ For a moment there came flickering into his mind the memory of a list - nine names marked for death.
▪ It marked the end of the possibility of an attitude of withdrawal for the papacy.
▪ Like the rings on a tree that mark the years, some measures remain, resulting in a gradual buildup of security.
▪ The Gingrich investigation lasted two years and was marked by extraordinary partisan wrangling.
▪ The success rates for two tasks differing only in the lengths of the rod shown is again marked.
▪ This time it was to mark a milestone in the history of exploration.
The Collaborative International Dictionary
mark

Marc \Marc\, n. [AS. marc; akin to G. mark, Icel. m["o]rk, perh. akin to E. mark a sign. [root]106, 273.] [Written also mark.]

  1. A weight of various commodities, esp. of gold and silver, used in different European countries. In France and Holland it was equal to eight ounces.

  2. A coin formerly current in England and Scotland, equal to thirteen shillings and four pence.

  3. A German coin and money of account. See Mark.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary
Mark

masc. proper name, variant of Marcus (q.v.). Among the top 10 names given to boy babies born in the U.S. between 1955 and 1970.

mark

"trace, impression," Old English mearc (West Saxon), merc (Mercian) "boundary, sign, limit, mark," from Proto-Germanic *marko (cognates: Old Norse merki "boundary, sign," mörk "forest," which often marked a frontier; Old Frisian merke, Gothic marka "boundary, frontier," Dutch merk "mark, brand," German Mark "boundary, boundary land"), from PIE *merg- "edge, boundary, border" (cognates: Latin margo "margin;" Avestan mareza- "border," Old Irish mruig, Irish bruig "borderland," Welsh bro "district").\n

\nThe primary sense is probably "boundary," which had evolved by Old English through "sign of a boundary," through "sign in general," then to "impression or trace forming a sign." Meaning "any visible trace or impression" first recorded c.1200. Sense of "line drawn to indicate starting point of a race" (as in on your marks ...) first attested 1887. The Middle English sense of "target" (c.1200) is the notion in marksman and slang sense "victim of a swindle" (1883). The notion of "sign, token" is behind the meaning "numerical award given by a teacher" (1829). Influenced by Scandinavian cognates.

mark

"unit of money or weight," late Old English marc, a unit of weight (chiefly for gold or silver) equal to about eight ounces, probably from Old Norse mörk "unit of weight," cognate with German Mark, probably ultimately a derivative of mark (n.1), perhaps in sense of "imprinted weight or coin." Used from 18c. in reference to various continental coinages, especially. the silver coin of Germany first issued 1875.

mark

"to put a mark on," Old English mearcian (West Saxon), merciga (Anglian) "to trace out boundaries," from Proto-Germanic *markojan (cognates: Old Norse merkja, Old Saxon markon, Old Frisian merkia, Old High German marchon, German merken "to mark, note," Middle Dutch and Dutch merken), from the root of mark (n.1).\n

\nInfluenced by Scandinavian cognates. Meaning "to have a mark" is from c.1400; that of "to notice, observe" is late 14c. Meaning "to put a numerical price on an object for sale" led to verbal phrase mark down (1859). Mark time (1833) is from military drill. Related: Marked; marking. Old French merchier "to mark, note, stamp, brand" is a Germanic loan-word.

Wiktionary
mark

Etymology 1 n. 1 (label en heading) ''Boundary, land within a boundary.'' 2 # (context obsolete English) A boundary; a border or frontier. (9th-19th c.) 3 # (context obsolete English) A boundary-post or fence. (13th-18th c.) 4 # A stone or post used to indicate position and guide travellers. (from 14th c.) 5 # (context archaic English) A type of small region or principality. (from 18th c.) 6 # (context historical English) A common, or area of common land, especially among early Germanic peoples. (from 19th c.) 7 (label en heading) ''Characteristic, sign, visible impression.'' 8 # An omen; a symptomatic indicator of something. (from 8th c.) 9 # A characteristic feature. (from 16th c.) 10 # A visible impression or sign; a blemish, scratch, or stain, whether accidental or intentional. (from 9th c.) 11 # A sign or brand on a person. (from 10th c.) 12 # A written character or sign. (from 10th c.) 13 # A stamp or other indication of provenance, quality etc. (from 11th c.) 14 # (context obsolete English) resemblance, likeness, image. (14th-16th c.) 15 # A particular design or make of an item (qualifier: now usually with following numeral). (from 15th c.) 16 # A score for finding the correct answer, or other academic achievement; the sum of such point gained as out of a possible total. (from 19th c.) 17 (label en heading) ''Indicator of position, objective etc.'' 18 # A target for shooting at with a projectile. (from 13th c.) 19 # An indication or sign used for reference or measurement. (from 14th c.) 20 # The target or intended victim of a swindle, fixed game or con game. (from 18th c.) 21 # (context obsolete English) The female genitals. (16th-18th c.) 22 # (context Australian rules football English) A catch of the ball directly from a kick of 10 metres or more without having been touched in transit, resulting in a free kick. (from 19th c.) 23 # (context sports English) The line indicating an athlete's starting-point. (from 19th c.) 24 # A score for a sporting achievement. (from 20th c.) 25 # (rfdef: English) 26 # (context cooking English) A specified level on a scale denoting gas-powered oven temperatures. (from 20th c.) 27 # Limit or standard of action or fact. 28 # Badge or sign of honour, rank, or official station. 29 # (context archaic English) preeminence; high position. 30 # (context logic English) A characteristic or essential attribute; a differential. 31 # (context nautical English) One of the bits of leather or coloured bunting placed upon a sounding line at intervals of from two to five fathoms. (The unmarked fathoms are called "deeps".) 32 (label en heading) ''Attention.'' 33 # (context archaic English) attention, notice. (from 15th c.) 34 # importance, noteworthiness. (qualifier: Generally in postmodifier ''“of mark”''.) (from 16th c.) 35 # (context obsolete English) Regard; respect. vb. 1 To put a mark upon; to make recognizable by a mark. 2 To indicate in some way for later reference. 3 To take note of. 4 To blemish, scratch, or stain. Etymology 2

n. 1 A measure of weight (especially for gold and silver), once used throughout Europe, equivalent to 8 oz. 2 (context now historical English) An English and Scottish unit of currency (originally valued at one '''mark''' weight of silver), equivalent to 13 shillings and fourpence. 3 Any of various European monetary units, especially the base unit of currency of Germany between 1948 and 2002, equal to 100 pfennigs. 4 A '''mark''' coin. Etymology 3

vb. (context imperative marching English) (alternative form of march lang=en dot=) (''said to be easier to pronounce while giving a command'').

WordNet
mark
  1. n. a number or letter indicating quality (especially of a student's performance); "she made good marks in algebra"; "grade A milk"; "what was your score on your homework?" [syn: grade, score]

  2. a distinguishing symbol; "the owner's mark was on all the sheep" [syn: marker, marking]

  3. a reference point to shoot at; "his arrow hit the mark" [syn: target]

  4. a visible indication made on a surface; "some previous reader had covered the pages with dozens of marks"; "paw prints were everywhere" [syn: print]

  5. the impression created by doing something unusual or extraordinary that people notice and remember; "it was in London that he made his mark"; "he left an indelible mark on the American theater"

  6. a symbol of disgrace or infamy; "And the Lord set a mark upon Cain"--Genesis [syn: stigma, brand, stain]

  7. formerly the basic unit of money in Germany [syn: German mark, Deutsche Mark, Deutschmark]

  8. Apostle and companion of Saint Peter; assumed to be the author of the second Gospel [syn: Saint Mark, St. Mark]

  9. a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of [syn: chump, fool, gull, patsy, fall guy, sucker, soft touch, mug]

  10. a written or printed symbol (as for punctuation); "his answer was just a punctuation mark"

  11. a perceptible indication of something not immediately apparent (as a visible clue that something has happened); "he showed signs of strain"; "they welcomed the signs of spring" [syn: sign]

  12. the shortest of the four Gospels in the New Testament [syn: Gospel According to Mark]

  13. an indication of damage [syn: scratch, scrape, scar]

  14. marking consisting of crossing lines [syn: crisscross, cross]

  15. something that exactly succeeds in achieving its goal; "the new advertising campaign was a bell ringer"; "scored a bull's eye"; "hit the mark"; "the president's speech was a home run" [syn: bell ringer, bull's eye, home run]

mark
  1. v. attach a tag or label to; "label these bottles" [syn: tag, label]

  2. designate as if by a mark; "This sign marks the border"; "He indicated where the border ended"

  3. be a distinctive feature, attribute, or trait; sometimes in a very positive sense; "His modesty distinguishes him form his peers" [syn: distinguish, differentiate]

  4. mark by some ceremony or observation; "We marked the anniversary of his death" [syn: commemorate]

  5. make or leave a mark on; "mark the trail so that we can find our way back"

  6. to accuse or condemn or openly or formally or brand as disgraceful; "He denounced the government action"; "She was stigmatized by society because she had a child out of wedlock" [syn: stigmatize, stigmatise, brand, denounce]

  7. notice or perceive; "She noted that someone was following her"; "mark my words" [syn: notice, note] [ant: ignore]

  8. mark with a scar; "The skin disease scarred his face permanently" [syn: scar, pock, pit]

  9. make small marks into the surface of; "score the clay before firing it" [syn: score, nock]

  10. establish as the highest level or best performance; "set a record" [syn: set]

  11. make underscoring marks [syn: score]

  12. remove from a list; "Cross the name of the dead person off the list" [syn: cross off, cross out, strike out, strike off]

  13. put a check mark on or next to; "Please check each name on the list"; "tick off the items" [syn: check, check off, mark off, tick off, tick]

  14. assign a grade or rank to, according to one's evaluation; "grade tests"; "score the SAT essays"; "mark homework" [syn: grade, score]

  15. insert punctuation marks into [syn: punctuate]

Gazetteer
Mark, IL -- U.S. village in Illinois
Population (2000): 491
Housing Units (2000): 209
Land area (2000): 0.811747 sq. miles (2.102416 sq. km)
Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km)
Total area (2000): 0.811747 sq. miles (2.102416 sq. km)
FIPS code: 46981
Located within: Illinois (IL), FIPS 17
Location: 41.265594 N, 89.248521 W
ZIP Codes (1990):
Note: some ZIP codes may be omitted esp. for suburbs.
Headwords:
Mark, IL
Mark
Wikipedia
Mark

Mark may refer to:

  • Mark (name), a male given name
  • Mark (surname), notable people with the surname or family name
Mark (Dintel)

The Mark is a river in Belgium and the Netherlands. It rises north of Turnhout, Belgium, in the municipality of Merksplas. It passes through Hoogstraten before crossing the border with the Netherlands. In the city centre of Breda it receives its main tributary Aa of Weerijs. Below Oudenbosch the Mark is known under the name Dintel. The Dintel flows into the Volkerak (part of the Rhine–Meuse–Scheldt delta) at Dintelsas. The Dintel and Mark are navigable for cargo ships up to long from Dintelsas to Breda.

Mark (name)

Mark is a common male given name and is derived from old Latin "Mart-kos", which means "consecrated to the god Mars", and also may mean "God of war" or "to be warlike". Marcus was one of the three most common given names in Ancient Rome. See Roman given names.

Márk

Márk is the Hungarian form of Mark (given name), though outside Mark the Evangelist the name is quite rare as a given name in Hungarian.

  • Márk Rózsavölgyi

Category:Hungarian masculine given names

Mark (dinghy)

The Mark is a single-hander class of small sailing dinghy. The design probably first appeared in the 1960s, at about the same time as the Laser, but never took off as a popular racing class. The Mark is in length, with forward and side buoyancy compartments. A free standing rotating mast stepped far forward in the front buoyancy compartment supports a mainsail.

Category:Dinghies

Mark (surname)

Mark as a surname may refer to:

  • Heinrich Mark (1911–2004), Estonian politician
  • Melissa Mark-Viverito, American politician
  • Michael Mark (disambiguation), multiple people
  • Ülar Mark (born 1968), Estonian architect
Mark (Arndt)

Archbishop Mark (secular name Michael Arndt; born January 29, 1941, Chemnitz, Saxony) is the Archbishop of Berlin, Germany and of Great Britain of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia and Overseer of the Russian Ecclesiastical Mission in Jerusalem.

Mark (currency)

The mark was a currency or unit of account in many nations. It is named for the mark unit of weight. The word mark comes from a merging of three Teutonic/ Germanic words, Latinised in 9th century post-classical Latin as marca, marcha, marha or marcus. It was a measure of weight mainly for gold and silver, commonly used throughout Western Europe and often equivalent to eight ounces. Considerable variations, however, occurred throughout the Middle Ages.

As of 2015, the only circulating currency named "mark" is the Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible mark.

Mark (unit)

The Mark (from Middle High German: Marc, march, brand) is originally a medieval weight or mass unit, which supplanted the pound weight as a precious metals and coinage weight from the 11th century. The Mark is traditionally a half pound weight and was usually divided into 8 ounces or 16 Lot. The significance of the Cologne Mark (Kölner Mark) in the German-speaking areas corresponded to about 234 gram.

Like the German systems, the French poid du marc weight system considered one "Marc" equal to half-a-pound (8 ounces).

Like the pound of 12 troy ounces (373 g), the mark was also used as a unit of currency, e.g. in many Shakespearean plays set in medieval England, and in various incarnations in Germany and Finland until the adoption of the euro in 1999.

Mark (rugby)

In rugby union, a player may mark a ball, which means that the player may catch it and cannot be tackled by rival players, and the marking player takes a free-kick at the position of the mark.

To mark a ball, the player must be inside his own team's twenty-two metre line. The mark is performed by a player (normally the Full Back), making a clean catch and shouting "Mark!". It is also common for the player to touch the ball on the ground or to hold up the ball with one hand to make his intentions clear to the referee and other players.

If for any reason, the player cannot take the kick within one minute, the marking team must take a scrum (and cannot otherwise choose a scrum). A ball may be marked if it has rebounded off the posts or crossbar. A mark may not be made from a kick-off.

After the marked ball is caught, the normal rules of a free kick apply, except in the case of a scrum option. A scrum] from a mark should ideally be taken from the position of the mark, but must be at least five metres from touch. If the mark was made in the in-goal area, the scrum is taken five metres from the goal line on a line running through the mark parallel to the touch line but always at least five metres from the touch line.

If a player from the opposing team charges the marking player after the call of "Mark!", then the team will be awarded a penalty kick taken from the position of the mark, unless the infringing player was offside, in which case the penalty will be given from the offside line.

For much of rugby's history, a mark could be made anywhere on the field, but under more stringent conditions: the marking player had to have both feet on the ground at the time of calling "Mark!", the defending side were allowed to advance as far as the mark in defending against the subsequent kick, and the kick itself had to propel the ball at least as far forward as the mark (in conjunction with the second stipulation, this effectively prevented the marking side from keeping possession with a tap-kick). However, under these restrictions a goal could be attempted. In the 1970s the mark was changed to the definition given above, except that it could be made anywhere in the defending side's 22; it is no longer a requirement that the marking player have both feet on the ground.

The mark is roughly equivalent to the fair catch in American football.

Mark (Dender)

The Mark (Dutch) or Marcq (French) is a river in Belgium, right tributary of the Dender. It rises around south-west of Enghien, Hainaut, close to the village St-Marcou in the forests of Bois de Ligne en Bois d'Enghien. It passes through the homonymous village Marcq, Enghien, Herne, Tollembeek, Galmaarden, Vollezele, Bever, Moerbeke and Viane. The Mark flows into the Dender in Deux-Acres, between Lessines and Geraardsbergen. The Dender is a tributary of the Scheldt. The Mark is approximately long.

Category:Rivers of Belgium Category:Rivers of Flemish Brabant Category:Rivers of Hainaut (province) Category:Enghien 2Mark

Mark (Australian football)

A mark is a skill in Australian rules football where a player cleanly catches (is deemed to have controlled the ball for sufficient time) a kicked ball that has travelled more than 15 metres without anyone else touching it or the ball hitting the ground.

It is a distinctive part of the game. Although catching the ball is also found in other codes of football, along with kicking the ball, it is one of the most prevalent skills in Australian football. Marking can also be one of the most spectacular and distinctive aspects of the game, and the best mark of the AFL season is awarded with the Mark of the Year, with similar competitions running across smaller leagues.

The top markers in the Australian Football League, like Jason Dunstall and Jonathan Brown take an average of over 8 marks per game. An AFL match between St Kilda and Port Adelaide in 2006 set a record of 303 marks in a single game.

Mark (designation)

The word mark, followed by number, is a method of designating a version of a product. The kind of products that use this convention vary widely in complexity. The concept shares some similarities with both the " Type (designation)" (Hardware) and the 1.0+ (1.1, 1.12, 2.0, 3.0, etc.) Software versioning convention often used to designate general software product releases. It is often abbreviated as Mk or M. Because a mark is often made to measure height or progress, by metonymy the word mark is used to note a defined level of development thus designations like "Mark I", "Mark II", "Mark III", "Mark IV", etc. come to be used as proper names. However, since the same name is used for a wide variety of products, it can have varied connotations for different persons.

Usage examples of "mark".

She continued to smile at him, and despite his unkempt appearance and the prison garb that marked him an absconder, she showed no sign of being afraid of him, Michael realized, with astonishment.

His accent was neutral, the nearly universal English of non-Russian officers in the CoDominium Service, and it marked his profession almost as certainly as did his posture and the tone of command.

The heart and facial features were clearly outlined with bright red achiote and the entire figure was torn with lance marks.

About this time my destiny made me acquainted with a nobleman called Mark Antony Zorzi, a man of parts and famous for his skill in writing verses in the Venetian dialect.

The juice of the root is very acrid when sniffed up the nostrils, and causes a copious flow of water therefrom, thus giving marked relief for obstinate congestive headache of a dull, passive sort.

Fenellan, acutely reminiscent of his having marked the spiritual adviser of Mrs.

The corporation met and adjourned for three weeks as a mark of respect.

The formula of one steroid produced by the adrenal cortex is presented schematically on page 78, with each of the 21 carbon atoms marked off by number.

In his very first night the new recruit had made himself one of the most popular of the brethren, marked already for advancement and high office.

These relics included an enclosure of coral blocks marking the outlines of a rectangular building which, Emory and Finney considered, showed similarities to some Tongan structures, and basalt adzes which must have come from a high volcanic island, since basalt does not occur naturally on low atolls.

He noted the health of the plants in the aeroponics lab, sketching their leaves and marking the ebb and flow of various diseases.

Mark Twain wrote: I must steal half a moment from my work to say how glad I am to have your book and how highly I value it, both for its own sake and as a remembrance of an affectionate friendship which has subsisted between us for nine years without a break and without a single act of violence that I can call to mind.

The book contained forty-two poems by such writers as Gemma Files, Charlee Jacob, Mark McLaughlin, Peter Crowther, Bruce Boston, Tom Piccirilli and others, along with a Foreword by John Rose, an Introduction from Phyllis Gotlieb and an Afterword by James Morrow.

Turanian languages are marked by the same agglutinative character found in the American races.

His course in the Senate, until the time of his defection, had been specially marked for its aggressiveness in support of the war and the destruction of the institution of slavery.