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Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English

light

I.noun
COLLOCATIONS FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a cigarette lighter (=something that produces a flame for lighting cigarettes)
▪ Does anyone have a match or a cigarette lighter?
a fine/light mist
▪ A fine mist began to settle on the water.
a gentle/light/soft tap
▪ There was a gentle tap on the door.
a light heart (=feeling happy)
▪ Paul left for home with a light heart.
a light lunch (=a small lunch)
▪ After a light lunch, he would take a nap each afternoon.
a light meal (=with not a lot of food)
▪ a light meal of salad
a light sleep (=a sleep from which you can easily be woken)
▪ I fell into a light sleep.
a light source (=something that produces light)
▪ The statue is illuminated by a hidden light source.
a light switch
▪ He reached for the light switch.
a light user (=someone who uses something only a little)
▪ Light users of the service will receive a reduction in their bill.
a lighted candle
▪ A procession moved through the village carrying lighted candles.
a light/heavy load (=not much or a lot of work)
▪ Hans has a heavy teaching load this semester.
a light/pale colour (=not dark or strong)
▪ Light colours make a room look larger.
a light/short sentence (=a short time in prison)
▪ We’re hoping that he gets off with a light sentence.
a light/slight/faint breeze
▪ The curtains lifted in the light breeze.
a lit/lighted/burning cigarette
▪ Someone dropped a lit cigarette and started the fire.
a lit/lighted/burning cigarette
▪ Someone dropped a lit cigarette and started the fire.
a small/light breakfast
▪ She ate a light breakfast of toast and coffee.
a street light/lamp
▪ It was getting dark, and the street lamps were already on.
a trick of the light
▪ At first he thought someone was coming towards him, but it was just a trick of the light.
a warning light
▪ Red warning lights were flashing.
artificial light/lighting
▪ Energy is being wasted by using artificial lighting when daylight is adequate.
artificial light/lighting
▪ Energy is being wasted by using artificial lighting when daylight is adequate.
blinding flash/light/glare etc
▪ the desert with its strange twisted plants and its blinding light
brake light
brilliant light
▪ She closed her eyes against the brilliant light.
chick lit
Christmas lights (=lights in the streets at Christmas, or on the Christmas tree)
▪ We went to see the Christmas lights in New York.
cigarette lighter
dark/light grey
▪ dark grey trousers
dark/light/pale/bright blue
▪ a dark blue raincoat
dark/light/pale/bright green
▪ a dark green dress
electric light/kettle/cooker etc
▪ the heat from a small electric fire
faint light
▪ the faint light of dawn
fairy lights
first light
gentle/light/moderate exercise (=not involving too much physical effort)
▪ Try to do some gentle exercise as part of your daily routine.
glaring light
▪ the glaring light of high noon
green light
▪ The government has given the green light to Sunday trading.
halogen bulb/lamp/light etc
hazard lights
heavy/light oil
▪ 2,000 barrels of heavy oil are produced a day.
▪ The oil corporation announced the discovery of another field of light oil.
heavy/light polling (=with many or few people voting)
heavy/light trading (=a lot of trading or a little trading)
▪ Shares dropped 10% in heavy trading.
heavy/light
▪ She was wearing a heavy coat and a thick scarf.
leaded lights
light a candle
▪ She lit a candle in the church.
light a cigarette
▪ Will went outside and lit a cigarette.
light a lamp
▪ Elizabeth lit the lamps and started rebuilding the fire.
light aircraft
light ale
light and airy
▪ All the hotel’s bedrooms are light and airy.
light beerespecially AmE (= lower in alcohol or calories than normal beer)
▪ He claims light beer has no flavor.
light bulb
light clothing (=made from thin materials)
▪ You’ll only need light clothing during the day.
light comedy (=about subjects that are not very serious)
▪ He is clearly talented at light comedy.
light duties (=not involving hard physical work)
▪ He'd been wounded, sent home and put on light duties.
light entertainment (=shows etc that are funny and easy to understand rather than serious)
▪ He believes that children can appreciate more than just light entertainment.
light heavyweight
light industry (=industries that involve the production of small goods)
▪ Jobs in light industry are increasing.
light industry
light meter
light pen
light pollution
light railway
light reading (=things that are easy and enjoyable to read)
▪ a bit of light reading for my holiday
light show
light sleeper (=someone who wakes easily)
light snacks
▪ Drinks and light snacks are served at the bar.
light snow (=when only a small amount falls)
▪ A light snow had begun to fall.
light wine (=without a lot of alcohol)
▪ The wine is light and refreshing.
light work (=work that is not physically hard)
▪ He had been ill, but she found him some light work to do.
light year
▪ a star 3,000 light years from Earth
light years ahead (=much more advanced)
▪ This design is light years ahead in performance and comfort.
light
▪ The traffic is fairly light at this time of day.
light
▪ The punishment seemed very light.
light (=with little water coming down)
▪ A light rain began to fall.
light/gentle (=not strong)
▪ Winds tomorrow will be light.
lighting rig
lightning lights (up) sth
▪ Lightning lit up the room briefly.
light/pale brown
▪ a light brown jacket
light/sandy (=containing a lot of sand)
▪ Some plants prefer sandy soils.
neon lights/signs (=ones that use neon)
▪ the neon lights of Las Vegas
painted...in a bad light (=described him in a way that made him seem bad)
▪ The article painted him in a bad light.
parking light
pilot light
reversing light
sb's eyes light up (=become excited)
▪ His eyes lit up when I mentioned the word money.
sb’s face lights up/brightens (=they start to look happy)
▪ Denise’s face lit up when she heard the news.
security light
see/present sth in a positive light (=see or present something as good)
▪ If you spend a year travelling after school, employers often see this in a positive light.
▪ The merger was presented to the world in a positive light.
shaft of light/sunlight
sound-level/light etc meter
Southern Lights
start/light a fire
▪ It was too damp to light a fire.
strip light
strip lighting
strobe light
tail light
the light of the moon
▪ The clouds blocked out the light of the moon.
the morning sun/light/mist
▪ the warmth of the morning sun
thin/light cotton
▪ a thin cotton dress
traffic lights
travel light (=not take many things with you)
▪ The idea was to travel light, so Travis allowed her to pack only one change of clothing.
UV light/radiation/rays etc
▪ the sun's harmful UV rays
wall-mounted clock/heater/lights etc
weak light
▪ He had only a weak light to see by.
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADJECTIVE
artificial
▪ Few people have not woken to the sounds of the dawn chorus nor seen moths drawn to artificial lights as daylight fades.
▪ It should be cultivated in moderately diffused or artificial light.
▪ Official sketches show a small warren of rooms, lit by artificial lights and stuffed with compact biological systems.
▪ Among these is James Casebere, who photographs miniature architectural constructions in artificial light.
▪ Their facial features are indistinguishable, brightly lit though they are by harsh artificial lights.
▪ The algae were cultivated under artificial light.
▪ The room is safe, enclosed, protected from the harsh glare of artificial light.
bad
▪ I've seen him at a distance, I've seen him in bad light.
▪ In an effort to restrain himself, he tried to imagine things in the worst possible light.
▪ They perch too far away in bad light.
▪ Middlesex forfeited their first innings and Durham were 11 without loss in their second innings when bad light ended play.
▪ Another break for bad light gave the fast men a breather.
▪ Leapor places all of these concerns in the worst possible light.
▪ The Wednesday result shouldn't be considered in too bad a light.
▪ Rain and bad light brought several interruptions, made batting difficult, and took the game into a second day.
bright
▪ Under bright overhead lights at one end of the shed a chair had been positioned, banked on three sides by sandbags.
▪ The double glazing had a metal layer that helped to create the reflective view from outside and cut down bright light inside.
▪ He crept to the door and opened it, blinking at the bright light.
▪ Keep the plant in bright light.
▪ Zen was sitting on a stool under a bright light in a small white-curtained cubicle, thinking about Trotsky and the ice-man.
▪ My only wish is that the bright lights were dimmed a bit for the dinner crowd.
▪ Some absorb the gas quickly, whereas others circulate it slowly and can not respond to floods of bright light.
▪ Photophobic children are often recommended to wear dark or tinted glasses to ease the discomfort caused by bright light.
brilliant
▪ As I climb, I think of the butterflies, the dreams of the holy men, fluttering in a brilliant light.
▪ And then there was a brilliant light and the Beast turned into a handsome prince.
▪ Within the box, suspended at its centre, glows a point of brilliant, pale-blue light.
▪ It casts a brilliant light on everyone around him.
▪ I awoke next morning to a brilliant pearly light, but when I went to the window, no sea was visible.
▪ I would be washed clean by the brilliant blue light, by the warm, golden sun.
▪ Beams of brilliant light jerked across the far wall and, slowly, the bars began to char.
▪ Over 20, 000 residents are awakened by a brilliant flash of light and heat to find their city in flames.
cold
▪ The cold green fluorescent lights are blazing, and Kim is at work taping ankles.
▪ The red maples have just shed their seeds, and two species of fireflies flash their cold white lights on warm evenings.
▪ Then they unrolled as a silver-white fleece, under the silent cold light of the moon.
▪ Through the frosted window blazed the cold light of winter morning; sidelight, the most harsh.
▪ A cold grey light made its way round the corners of the curtains and trickled into the room.
▪ He switched off his lamp to watch the cold, silver light settle over the church and headstones.
different
▪ It makes you think about those sullen high schoolers in a different light, see their lives along a time line.
▪ The girls regarded it in a different light.
▪ They get to see women in a different light.
▪ The Dark Elves see Khaine in a different light.
▪ The officer was city-bred and educated, so that the false teeth appeared to him in a different light.
▪ I view parallels to Piggy and Simon in a different light.
▪ It involves reflecting light of a quite different color-invisible light in the form of X ray radiation-off certain crystals.
dim
▪ Flickering beams of dim light came with it, caressing the machinery which shielded their source from direct view.
▪ Only a dim light glowed in the direction of the stairs.
▪ Looking at him in the dim light I saw he was clad only in vest and pants.
▪ No one dared to object to him directly about his dim light, though some people grumbled about it in loud whispers.
▪ There were only two dim lights flickering from two iron brackets high up on the wall.
▪ They sat at the table in dim light going over pronunciations.
▪ The two men looked at each other in the dim light, their faces grey and weary.
▪ Not so beautiful by day, perhaps, but in dim light they look like movie stars.
electric
▪ The electric light was an invention with profound existential consequences.
▪ There were electric lights burning at the entryway.
▪ There is no electric light, and the floor is compacted earth.
▪ I let out an involuntary gasp. Electric lights sprang on all over the ceiling in an irregular pattern.
▪ A moment later, all the electric lights went out.
▪ Travellers very often notice that electric light and trams are brought into streets which as yet have no houses.
▪ It foresaw electric light, credit cards, shopping malls and electronic broadcasting.
▪ When lit only by the electric lights, the large figures in the foreground appear thicker, more dimensional.
faint
▪ A faint sliver of light showed along the bottom of the door on his right.
▪ A laser transmitted faint light signals to an electronic detector.
▪ Standing all day on the wet clay floor under the dropping ceiling in the faint light cast by tallow candles was grim.
▪ After a sharp turn in the path, they are suddenly approaching a faint square of light.
▪ M56 is not at all prominent, but shows up as a faint patch of light.
▪ When I saw the faint glow of light in the distance, it scarcely registered with me.
▪ A faint yellow light filtered through the thin curtains.
▪ A faint light now appears behind the beaded curtain of one of the houses that face the courtyard.
fluorescent
▪ There was no floodlighting here, only a small fluorescent light over the entrance.
▪ While the other tour members chatted and compared equipment Mom stood to one side, her face pale under the fluorescent lights.
▪ Down below were the pink seashell murals lit by fluorescent lights, and distant black and white movies on the screen.
▪ I bought nine fluorescent light fixtures-bulbs, ballast, and wire.
▪ There was a skim of grease that shone in the fluorescent light of the Kitchen.
▪ On the desk was what appeared to be a fluorescent light box the size of a briefcase.
▪ Lightning flashed again, brilliant as a fluorescent light.
▪ Strips of fluorescent lights struggled against the gloominess of the space.
green
▪ General Thurman still had to receive a final green light from the president once he had worked out a plan.
▪ But after waiting years for the building permits, Rohr got the green light to build just as the market turned down.
▪ A solitary street-lamp shed feeble green light, leaving most of the street in shadow.
▪ The coaches may have been flashing the green light, but all the players saw was a blinking red.
▪ An enormous structure, resembling a Calder mobile, and hung with green and blue lights, revolves slowly.
▪ The action got a green light Monday from the Food and Drug Administration.
▪ Upon the dashboard of a black Cadillac sedan parked in a nearby side-road a green light began to flash furiously.
▪ There was this eerie green light.
harsh
▪ Chapter Twenty one Urquhart flicked the main switch and she blinked as the room was washed by the harsh overhead light.
▪ In the harsh light, its most notable feature is a small metal grate over a drain in the very center.
▪ The harsh lights that the photographers had used still glared down on the scene.
▪ The president of the bank was a hard-faced aesthete with cheekbones so deeply indented that he appeared skull-like under harsh ceiling lights.
▪ The space underneath was filled with a harsh light of burnished gold.
▪ Their facial features are indistinguishable, brightly lit though they are by harsh artificial lights.
▪ The presence of Jen was like a harsh light in his eyes.
▪ The refugees stumbled toward military buses, blinking at the harsh lights.
natural
▪ Table 11.2 shows times when natural light is recommended or advised against.
▪ Saconi was in there at one of the tables, blithe and ambivalent in the diffused natural light.
▪ Whilst we stress the artificial nature of most time-cues, it would be misleading to suggest that natural light is without effect.
▪ A special feature is a cantilevered bay window which is designed to create more space and to give plenty of natural light.
▪ Other requirements: Light: Needs very good light, especially natural light.
▪ Soane created a beautifully spacious building, awash in natural light.
▪ Modern school buildings make as much use as possible of natural light, incorporating as they do large windows.
▪ He worked out of doors, with natural light and a white background.
new
▪ The neutron observations may help cast new light on solar flares and solar activity.
▪ Hajdu sheds new, revelatory light on the complex relationship between Strayhorn and Ellington.
▪ This guy Rufus appears in a new light.
▪ The Agency is always willing to consider a man in a new light.
▪ What had to be understood was the process which led to the evolution of society seen in this new light.
▪ And marketing executives began looking at the Hispanic population in a new light.
▪ Campaigners now hope parish councillors will abandon their scheme for 30 new lights and accept alternative proposals instead.
▪ That throws a whole new light on it.
poor
▪ Her tests for the relation between grammatical structure and context formation similarly show the unschooled Wolof children in a poor light.
▪ The poor light barely reached the chamber's four walls.
▪ The curtains in the flat were drawn, cutting down even the poor light that remained from outside.
▪ Then, having ensured that the match would finish so late, Moin complained about the poor light.
▪ Delgard paused at the top of the stairs, allowing his eyes to adjust to the poor light.
▪ Even if, in the poor light, you did see it, you would dismiss it.
▪ Should children attempt to read in poor light?
▪ He glanced at his watch, bringing it close to his face because of the poor light.
positive
▪ Yet the presentational imperative to project the policies of government in a positive light masked the existence of inner doubts.
▪ You can always interpret things in a more positive light or a more negative light.
▪ It was as if a door had opened before him into a dim but positive light.
▪ Books portraying black men in a positive light are simply not part of the growth industry.
▪ This may help one to see the beauty and wisdom of the natural world in a much more positive light.
▪ By contrast, 57 percent viewed Dole in a positive light, while only 27 percent saw him in a negative light.
▪ Present everything in a positive light.
red
▪ The Governor's sanctum was a leviathan suffused with the same dreary red light.
▪ The deeper they live, the less red light penetrates compared with blue.
▪ There were red lights in her curls which she had never noticed and her complexion was without flaw.
▪ The greener the water, the less red or blue light penetrates.
▪ Down below, two points of red light appear, one at a time like a wink in reverse.
▪ The bigger issue is, will San Franciscans still be allowed to run red lights across Market Street?
▪ One red light came on faintly.
▪ The flashing red light went out, to be replaced by a steady light of a soothing green.
soft
▪ On the landing a soft light shone into the dark from the corridor, as in memory.
▪ A soft pinkish light played against the curtains.
▪ In the soft evening light, I retraced my steps back to town, soothed by the songs of blackbirds and chaffinches.
▪ The soft light of dusk was thinning, leaving trees and buildings blackened agalnst the evening sky.
▪ Through the curtains a soft grey light is creeping.
▪ She took her place at his side again, and watched the exquisitely etched face in the soft light.
▪ His olive skin seemed to glint in the soft light of the hallway; the flat behind him was almost totally dark.
▪ As the students are talking, a wave of soft, vague light, of sleepy distraction, passes over Primo.
strong
▪ It will even tolerate strong light, when the colour of the leaves will intensify.
▪ These more primitive readings in sharar throw a particularly strong light on the occurrence of the institution narrative there.
▪ Too strong light should be avoided, as it has the habit of developing leaves above the water.
▪ The color of the lower surface is more intense in stronger light.
▪ Other requirements: Light: Needs strong light.
▪ Her work still casts a strong light.
▪ Given strong light, the plant will grow stronger, with deep coloration.
▪ Often these were accompanied by strong flashes of light.
■ NOUN
street
▪ The road was closed for a while because of a dangerous street light.
▪ Also on the list: Third Street light rail: Check.
▪ The street lights are still on, but the sky ain't black no more.
▪ As they approached the corner, the street lights came on.
▪ Gas was used in houses and for street lights from the early nineteenth century.
▪ The track awakes in the half light of dawn, when there are still misty halos around the street lights.
▪ Just then, the street lights come on.
▪ The city also gave an additional $ 20, 000 for banners to be hung from street lights.
traffic
▪ The letters are divided into traffic light colours to signal to customers whether their endowment will pay off their mortgage.
▪ I usually posted myself then at a busy intersection where a traffic light controlled commuter flow from Newark.
▪ Anger is like a red light at the traffic lights.
▪ Cars have been stolen at traffic lights.
▪ Up ahead the traffic lights were on red but he didn't slow up.
▪ Julie didn't answer, but drove on towards the traffic lights, glancing again in the rear-view mirror.
▪ She slowed down at the traffic lights by Sloane Street.
▪ The woman was killed while she was out walking with her husband, when two cars collided at traffic lights.
warning
▪ The warning light came on, and it's thought that was the point at which the pilot radioed for help.
▪ Looking right then left he saw the signals with their warning lights reassuring him of their presence.
▪ But when the pilot switched on his flight systems, a red warning light glowed.
▪ Barriers and warning lights were put up and further warning lights were placed a short distance away.
▪ It is because at this time the warning light is more easily visible in the twilight than in the daylight.
▪ The bulb had obviously been hit hard soas to break its filament, to ensure no warning light came on.
■ VERB
bathe
▪ The fields and woods were bathed in golden light overlaid with a blue haze of heat.
▪ We looked like Superman escorting Howdy Doody, and I bathed in the light of his company.
▪ Multi-bracketed candelabra placed along the centre helped the sconce torches to bathe the room in light.
▪ Even the water tower in Addison, a northern suburb, is bathed in blue light.
▪ The castle was bathed in a flickering light.
▪ Conversely, Cafe Pinot bathes in the light of learning shed by the L.A.
▪ But then the sun broke through and the field, the altar, the tree, was bathed in a pure light.
▪ He threw open a side door off the first-floor hall, and we were bathed in light.
cast
▪ Overhead, a bulb casts an eerie bluish light.
▪ Biophysics is certainly able to cast significant light on processes occurring within living cells.
▪ The sun had just gone down, and our apartment was cast in a pale-pastel light.
▪ Moreover Pound's anti-Semitism, later so notorious, certainly casts a sinister light on his readiness to broach these issues.
▪ It casts a brilliant light on everyone around him.
▪ Street lights are not too bad because they don't shine directly into your face and only cast a fairly soft light.
▪ Her work still casts a strong light.
fade
▪ Some likened it to facing the fast bowler Curtly Ambrose in a fading light.
▪ In the fading light of the patio, Yolanda can not make out the expression on the dark face.
▪ The lights were fading - the lights had all gone out.
▪ There was a fading light I had never quite seen.
▪ I turned to warn Tam and Richie, whom I could just see in the fading light.
flash
▪ It's like she flashed a bright light in my eyes, and I have to look away.
▪ The door opened and flashed with light and then it slammed.
▪ They'd paint them pink and mark them with big, yellow, flashing lights.
▪ Properly crafted, such legislation raises legitimate questions about the extent and nature of U.S. involvement and flashes warning lights.
▪ He wanted to know why I was flashing the light.
▪ For the remainder of the evening, Barbara and A. B. Everage honked their horn and flashed their lights.
▪ The nomes had learned to be worried by things with flashing blue lights on top.
see
▪ Out in the street afterwards they wandered around the corner into Leicester Square to see the Christmas lights.
▪ Freedom of press, seen in this light, becomes a questionable guarantee.
▪ She toiled up the stairs, and saw that a light showed on the landing above.
▪ But then I saw this bright light at the window.
▪ People won't admit it, they're too busy grabbing to see that the lights have fused.
▪ Then I seen in the light, like inside it, with the light all around, a person.
▪ But, like the National Health Service, education could be seen in a different light.
▪ Rather than seeing a light at the end of the sanctions tunnel, Hussein felt increasingly boxed in.
shed
▪ In this chapter, some of the evidence will be reviewed which sheds some light on three questions.
▪ Hajdu sheds new, revelatory light on the complex relationship between Strayhorn and Ellington.
▪ Sometimes they can have a mythical dimension, images that shed a new light on traditions of wisdom or legend.
▪ A streetlight beside an elementary school shed just enough light to let me make sense out of the map.
▪ Unfortunately, he didn't, nor was the lecturer, when asked, able to shed any light on the subject.
▪ Can you shed any light on my quest?
▪ A solitary street-lamp shed feeble green light, leaving most of the street in shadow.
▪ Podesta's role sheds light on both questions.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ray of hope/light etc
▪ Amid the crushing disappointment of the general election there was a ray of light for the Conservatives.
▪ Besides, today there had been a ray of hope.
▪ But only when a ray of light attempts to pierce this darkness does the real, eerie action unroll.
▪ But the Red Or Dead catwalk show offered a ray of hope.
▪ Each time a ray of light passes through a lens it is slightly weakened.
▪ The Government's resignation is a victory, a ray of hope to take into the dark days ahead.
ambient temperature/light etc
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ If you space heat then you will have an ambient temperature of 75-80°F and even higher humidity.
▪ It really comes into its own with flash as the metering balances the flash against the ambient lighting conditions with great results.
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ The ambient temperature for each day of the study was determined from local weekly weather statistics.
▪ The ambient temperature in Celsius is roughly equal to the number of cricket chirps in 8 seconds plus 5.
at first light
▪ The search continued at first light.
▪ They left camp at first light and were in the mountains by nightfall.
▪ A small flock of evening grosbeaks flew over, and at first light I heard chickadees and goldfinches.
▪ It was black as night at new moon and white as frost at first light.
▪ Mountain rescue teams continued the hunt overnight, and a full-scale search resumed at first light.
▪ The ambush would leave its position the next morning, at first light, to return.
▪ The Caribou took off at first light.
▪ We have had trouble at first light with the Khmer Rouge.
be all sweetness and light
▪ The negotiations were not all sweetness and light.
be bathed in light/sunshine etc
▪ He threw open a side door off the first-floor hall, and we were bathed in light.
big/light/fussy etc eater
▪ During the time she was living with the Abramses, Katelyn was happy and a big eater, Carter said.
▪ While never a big eater, he did tend to snack it through the day and night.
cast light on/onto sth
▪ The convergence of the techniques will cast light on perspectives and how they are controlled.
▪ The different ways in which superantigens activate T cells casts light on the pathogenesis of infectious disease.
▪ The incident has cast light on the creeping privatisation of the drug war.
▪ The investigation explores the possibility of using probate inventories to cast light on this and related questions.
▪ We use this to cast light on a metaphor of which we are given no other interpretation.
dim your headlights/lights
dip your headlights/lights
▪ He put his foot on the accelerator and dipped his headlights.
drenched in/with light
give sb/sth the green light
▪ The board just gave us the green light to begin research.
▪ Doctors gave him the green light yesterday to start against New Orleans on Sunday night.
▪ Everyone has given it the green light.
guiding light/hand/star
▪ And that is what Aeneas's young son did under the guiding hand of Alecto.
▪ Eddie was his hero, his guiding light.
▪ Father Peter, its guiding light, was also its provider of funds and sustenance.
▪ That will be the guiding light of the next Labour government.
▪ To followers, he is more than just a guiding light - he is the Messiah.
▪ Under Mr Yarrow's guiding hand, the reputation of the school was untarnished, these five long years.
hide your light under a bushel
in the cold light of day
▪ I knew that, in the cold light of day, he held all the aces.
▪ Night-time madness isn't appealing, seen in the cold light of day.
jump a light
leading light
▪ Another was a leading light opera singer in the local community.
▪ By now, Braudel had become one of its leading lights, and from 1956 to 1968 he was virtually its editor.
▪ Harrison, a man of simple birth and high intelligence, crossed swords with the leading lights of his day.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
▪ The merchants were the leading lights of the popolo grasso or rich bourgeoisie.
▪ This victory may set Stretch up with a world-title elimination fight with Britain's other leading light middleweight, Chris Pyatt.
light years ago
light years ahead/better etc than sth
light/comic relief
▪ After a day's work, it was a bit of light relief to use it.
▪ After this beginning some light relief must have been welcome.
▪ All we can say is that, between them, the team eventually raises £3,450 for Comic Relief charities.
▪ Cold people shake Comic Relief canisters.
▪ For comic relief, obviously; but we also suspect a topical reference worth considering as evidence in the dating game.
▪ Her only light relief was Tony, who took her out every night.
▪ If it afforded the guardians a little light relief, the minutes do not suggest that the complaint was taken anything but seriously.
▪ Then, for light relief, this page: murder and murder trials.
light/fair/dark complected
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
naked light/flame/sword etc
▪ A very powerful naked light bulb hung from the office ceiling.
▪ Both men were armed, each carrying a naked sword and dirk.
▪ He is like a naked light.
▪ Obviously this is untrue - it is not the naked light that Blanche can not stand, it is the truth.
▪ She likes to cover up the truth like she covers over the naked light.
▪ She turned, all flaxen and pink and white, haloed by the naked light bulbs round the mirror.
▪ This gives a double meaning to Blanche's hatred of naked light.
play a hose/light on sth
play of light
▪ I have a wonderful play of light and shade, and the tungsten light gives a very similar effect.
▪ Make notes as you watch the play of light in various areas as the sun tracks east to west across the sky.
pool of water/blood/light etc
▪ A pool of light, expanding circles, merging, dragging me down.
▪ A guard found him lying in a pool of blood, and a doctor saved him.
▪ After they are replaced, the spent fuel rods are cooled for several years in pools of water at the plants.
▪ His black telephone sat captive in a pool of light, ready for interrogation.
▪ She leaves the coach and wanders through fields for many miles until between trees she sees a deep black pool of water.
▪ The kind of pool of light depends on whether the bulb fitted inside is a spot, flood or an ordinary bulb.
▪ Then on the fifth day, mid-morning, a pool of light as pale and clear as moonstone appeared on the horizon.
▪ There was a pool of blood on the tarmac now, around his head.
punch sb's lights out
run a (red) light
▪ An old man who worked in a poultry store was stopped for running a light.
▪ For every motorist who runs a red light, there are five pedestrians who do it.
▪ It was going to sea with only its running lights on.
▪ Jones still faces a misdemeanor charge of reckless driving and an infraction for running a red light.
▪ Men are more likely to run a red light, forget to signal, or drink and drive.
▪ The running lights flashed off and a thick silence filled up the day.
▪ The bigger issue is, will San Franciscans still be allowed to run red lights across Market Street?
▪ When you run a red light, a few coins save a fine.
see the light
▪ But soon he could only see the lights of the boat in the distance.
▪ Each has attracted his or her share of supporters who could also see the light once it was pointed out to them.
▪ Five minutes later he saw the lights of a village pub.
▪ From two blocks away you can see the light radiating up into the sky.
▪ It was uncanny and Maggie was never so glad to see the light from her own room and get Ana back indoors.
▪ One must have experienced deeply, known greatness - seen the light, as he said.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ You were sitting in your seat, pressed back by the acceleration, and you saw the light beams curve.
see the light of day
▪ Business contracts go through armies of lawyers before they see the light of day.
▪ Most observers predict the bill won't see the light of day until at least January.
▪ And eventually, Guinness as we know it, rich subtle and dark, is ready to see the light of day.
▪ Get to the back of the drawers and cupboards - areas which don't often see the light of day.
▪ I am not too worried about the new council tax because I doubt whether it will see the light of day.
▪ I never sold a garment or got an order from this source, I wonder if they saw the light of day.
▪ Many of Brindley's ideas were regarded as the hair-brained schemes of a madman which would never see the light of day.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ The implication must be that a lot of bids are being planned but never see the light of day.
▪ There's so much good stuff that has never seen the light of day.
shed light
▪ A fretful wind was not enough to open them and shed light on the ruptured earth in which they lay.
▪ An analysis of the results should shed light on the workings of the Northern Ireland labour market.
▪ Brophy said the man was not considered a suspect, but investigators hope he can shed light on what started the blaze.
▪ Eastin and her task force hope to shed light on the challenge by early next year.
▪ Podesta's role sheds light on both questions.
▪ The extent of Hygeberht's authority perhaps sheds light on Offa's principal area of interest.
▪ Therefore they shed light on the comparative institutional questions with which we are concerned.
show sb in a good/bad etc light
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
string of pearls/lights/beads etc
▪ A string of lights on the prom Dancing mad in the storm Who lives in such a place?
▪ A string of pearls was around her neck, and the bones of her right hand clutched a Bible.
▪ Beads can choke babies if swallowed, and long strings of beads can also half-strangle older children.
▪ Careful inspection of the image showed what looked like a string of pearls embedded in a bright haze.
▪ There was a cavity beneath with a string of pearls in it.
▪ When the harbor across the bay becomes a string of lights, foghorns take up the bass.
the Southern Lights
the bright lights
▪ First I turned off the brightest lights.
▪ He gestured toward the street, the bright lights of Osaka shining before us.
▪ In the bright lights of the foyer his face was clearly illuminated.
▪ Instead Elizabeth spent a year at business college in St Albans before joining the bright lights of London's magazine world.
▪ It had to be the cold air and the bright lights against the darkness.
▪ Self- imposed pressure Lately, she has wondered if her message is getting lost in the bright lights of television.
▪ Under the bright lights in the train, both boy and man look pale, lifeless.
▪ Young Gilbey's passion was cars and he skipped going to university to move to the bright lights of London.
throw a light/shadow
▪ Begin from a fighting stance, perhaps by throwing a light snap punch into the opponent's face from the front hand.
▪ But the flames were growing higher, throwing light, casting dancing shadows.
▪ Fossils do throw light on the history of the lateral line and tail.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ He uses relativity to throw light on time and eternity, and indeterminacy to comment on free will.
▪ The role of premises is to throw light on a subject; the role of evidences is to give weight to it.
▪ Understanding the nature and activities of such organisations helped throw light upon issues of town identity and representation.
▪ Where once they flew in such flocks that they threw shadows over the earth, they now survive in a few straggling colonies.
throw light on sth
▪ A comparison of the two will throw light on the crisis of conscience on both occasions.
▪ But I have not found anything in the careful judgment of Mustill L.J. which throws light on the issues presently under consideration.
▪ But my frantic, full-beamed Mayday signal only threw light on a de-iced porthole.
▪ Epidemiological studies sometimes threw light on preventable causes of cancer.
▪ Experiments to throw light on the processes at work must themselves be long-term.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ It also seeks to throw light on the role assumed by planters and the planting lobby in society at large.
▪ Life-positions throw light on why it is that some people tend to be winners and some losers in life.
trip the light fantastic
▪ Among their routines as they trip the light fantastic at the Dolphin Centre in Darlington are the old time and modern dances.
turn the light out
▪ He turned the light out as the clergyman left the room.
▪ I take the car up as far as it will go, then turn the lights out.
▪ They turned the lights out and sat in fear.
▪ Would you mind turning the light out, Robert?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
Light was coming into the room through a crack in the door.
▪ a gas lamp that gives as much light as a 100 watt bulb
▪ a sudden flash of blinding light
▪ In the fading light she could just make out the shape of a tractor.
▪ She sat reading by the light of the fire.
▪ That light's really bright.
▪ The light isn't good enough to take a photograph.
▪ The light was fading, and I was afraid we wouldn't be home before dark.
▪ The 5-inch model of the starship came complete with blinking lights.
▪ the cold blue light of the Arctic
▪ The valley was bathed in the soft light of dawn.
▪ We could see light coming from under the door.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ He switched on the light, opened the door, and went into the dim public space.
▪ He switched the light on and looked at the clock.
▪ Just then, the street lights come on.
▪ The blaze of lights in the evening was part of it, and the singing and shivering the rails made.
▪ The speed of light through our apparatus should vary as the speed of the relative ether current varies.
▪ This can be put in its least intuitively reasonable light if we assume just two firms.
▪ You will be aware that normally, of course, reflected light is of the same color as incident light.
II.adjective
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ NOUN
aircraft
▪ Read in studio Police have now named the three rugby fans who were killed when their light aircraft crashed into a field.
▪ In the light aircraft groups, there is a similarity of performance.
▪ Probably because of the very much greater stick forces and lower rates of pitch occurring in most light aircraft.
▪ All gliders and light aircraft have to recover satisfactorily with the standard method.
▪ Furthermore if Grimbergen is closed, where do the present 150 plus light aircraft presently based there go?
▪ Today, Cessna is out of the light aircraft market for ever and Piper is on its knees.
▪ This may well be one of those rare occasions when light aircraft pilots have the opportunity to shape something that affects them.
▪ Ivars has built over the years a series of light aircraft, most employing a faithful Cirrus Minor I engine.
entertainment
▪ In the seventies, it seemed that a light entertainment show on television was not complete without a clutch of catchphrases.
▪ But as message movies began to muscle out light entertainment, Reynolds became disposable.
▪ Moving the Nine O'clock News would free a peak slot to attract more viewers with dramas and light entertainment.
▪ Both videos are situations comedies made by a top television light entertainment director and an experienced cast of comedy actors.
▪ Music that could never be taken as light entertainment.
▪ The licencee must also pick a selection of other programme categories such as drama, light entertainment and sport.
▪ The video has been made using a highly-experienced cast of comedy actors and a top television light entertainment director.
industry
▪ Chester, in particular, is making loud noises about converting some of its greenbelt for housing and light industry.
▪ Out of this there soon came the normal development of light industry.
▪ These communities have an average population of between 200 and 700 and an economic base of agriculture plus some light industry.
▪ About 80 per-cent of farmworkers were women, he said, and over 90 percent of workers in light industry.
▪ Now it is a prosperous place, making its living from light industry and the visitors who come to tour the battlefields.
▪ Other engineering and light industries are filling many of the old mills and clothing factories.
▪ The metal and machine industries benefited most directly, while the stimulus spread to the textile and other light industries.
▪ They also have new light industries.
lunch
▪ No relaxing by the pool or light lunch over Football Focus for my lads.
▪ They were seated, as was their custom, in the summer-house, where they had just finished a light lunch.
▪ There is a smart àlacarte restaurant for dinner and light lunches are served in the bar.
▪ At the 52-storey building, the 1,000 staff are served light lunches and snacks by manager Tony Gatland and his staff.
▪ Vegetarian dishes and other special diets are no problem for Judy and snacks and light lunches will be provided on request.
▪ Why not fix to have a light lunch here one day if ever in Edinburgh.
▪ Dishy meals Whether you want inspiration for a light lunch or an impressive supper, we can provide it.
▪ Choice of ALaCarte Restaurant or the Pavilion Lounge which serves light lunches and traditional beers.
note
▪ Shame on you! she scolded herself, banking down the passion, trying for a lighter note.
▪ Keep all your meetings and get togethers on a light note by banning anyone talking shop.
rail
▪ This route has been earmarked for a possible future extension of the Midland Metro light rail transit system.
▪ Prescott said this could even include light rail or metro projects.
▪ Chiarelli sees light rail as an alternative to widening the busy Airport Parkway which parallels the route near South Keys.
▪ Thus, the comparative analysis of achievable stopping patterns by bus, light rail and suburban rail is well done.
railway
▪ We will encourage new schemes, using light railways and trams in cities.
▪ Kitsons' own designs for light railways, such as the Leek &038; Manifold in Staffordshire, were rugged and powerful.
▪ The only other opportunity in the foreseeable future is likely to be the new light railway in London's Docklands.
▪ If those words are retained in the legislation, those railways would still require a light railway order at some time.
▪ The company have retained the leisurely atmosphere of the turn-of-the-century light railway being situated off the major tourist circuits.
▪ Both produced passenger levels far greater than forecast and have encouraged more planning of urban light railways.
▪ Local authorities are demonstrating a growing interest in light railways as a cheap, energy-efficient transport solution in urban areas.
▪ Who knows, someday we might see the Minsterley and Shropshire-Montgomeryshire lines restored as light railways to solve Shrewbury's commuter problems!
rain
▪ A light rain began to fall.
▪ The clouds were turbulent and gray, a cool, light rain still falling.
▪ As he walked along, light rain began to fall.
▪ East Anglia: Patchy light rain.
▪ The prohibition was lifted in some counties last week after light rain fell over much of the state.
▪ Corbett trudged down the beaten, muddy track; the sky was overcast and a light rain began to fall.
▪ We had the window open, and it had just started to rain the lightest rain imaginable.
relief
▪ I have to be allowed a bit of light relief.
▪ The fighter pilot taking a little light relief.
▪ However, the Full Moon in Scorpio on May 16 should bring everyone to their senses and give some light relief.
▪ It seems that the staff were inclined to regard the women as light relief from the sombre business of teaching science.
▪ After this beginning some light relief must have been welcome.
▪ Her only light relief was Tony, who took her out every night.
▪ Then, for light relief, this page: murder and murder trials.
touch
▪ But it works, as do the disc brakes all round, positively and with a light touch.
▪ Some one had given his arm a light touch out of fear and respect.
▪ This performance needed more pace, a lighter touch throughout from the orchestra and much greater clarity from the first violins.
▪ There may be subjective numbness and slightly impaired pain and light touch sensation over the outer aspect of the foot. 3.
▪ A novel about novel-writing, which handles its tricky subject with a light touch.
▪ Does she love light touch or avoid it?
▪ It was in that kind of environment that the Takeover Panel started its life from small beginnings and with a light touch.
▪ The H-19 had hydraulic controls which required a light touch.
wind
▪ Conditions in Nidri or Porto Heli are ideal, with lighter winds and flat water.
▪ Clear skies and light winds helped cleanup crews Sunday.
▪ The wet grass glittered and near-by a nut-tree sparkled iridescent, winking and gleaming as its branches moved in the light wind.
▪ We are dead in the water, heading into a light wind and surface current.
▪ A Feeling 850 Club gives sporty sailing in a sensitive boat for up to 6; she's very fast in light winds.
▪ A light wind sprang up, and the smoke of their guns drifted over the valley towards the cemetery.
▪ We don't provide formal instruction, but novices pick up a lot by sailing out and back in light winds.
▪ There was a light wind and a wide sky.
work
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Mentally and physically handicapped do light work according to their capability, but get the same wages as everybody else.
▪ He sustained injuries to his back and was thereafter only able to undertake light work.
▪ Most of the work is manual, and buffaloes are used only for light work in the mud of the paddy-fields.
▪ The lighter work to which men tended to shift as they got older was generally worse paid.
▪ And the £170,000 military breakdown gear made light work of pulling the battered truck out of the waters.
▪ The Safrane made light work of the uncrowded road to the beer-producing town of Pilsen.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
years
▪ But not your place, of course: we're a good four hundred light years from your usual stamping grounds.
▪ Only a few thousand light years.
▪ Those late 1940s now seem light years away from the customs prevailing in present day society.
▪ The political culture then was light years from the one today.
▪ You will be light years ahead.
▪ That will permit the search to reach out to 100 light years, covering about 300 stars.
▪ We shall be seeing that quantum effects can occur over distances of many metres, or even light years.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ray of hope/light etc
▪ Amid the crushing disappointment of the general election there was a ray of light for the Conservatives.
▪ Besides, today there had been a ray of hope.
▪ But only when a ray of light attempts to pierce this darkness does the real, eerie action unroll.
▪ But the Red Or Dead catwalk show offered a ray of hope.
▪ Each time a ray of light passes through a lens it is slightly weakened.
▪ The Government's resignation is a victory, a ray of hope to take into the dark days ahead.
be all sweetness and light
▪ The negotiations were not all sweetness and light.
be bathed in light/sunshine etc
▪ He threw open a side door off the first-floor hall, and we were bathed in light.
big/light/fussy etc eater
▪ During the time she was living with the Abramses, Katelyn was happy and a big eater, Carter said.
▪ While never a big eater, he did tend to snack it through the day and night.
cast light on/onto sth
▪ The convergence of the techniques will cast light on perspectives and how they are controlled.
▪ The different ways in which superantigens activate T cells casts light on the pathogenesis of infectious disease.
▪ The incident has cast light on the creeping privatisation of the drug war.
▪ The investigation explores the possibility of using probate inventories to cast light on this and related questions.
▪ We use this to cast light on a metaphor of which we are given no other interpretation.
dim your headlights/lights
dip your headlights/lights
▪ He put his foot on the accelerator and dipped his headlights.
give sb/sth the green light
▪ The board just gave us the green light to begin research.
▪ Doctors gave him the green light yesterday to start against New Orleans on Sunday night.
▪ Everyone has given it the green light.
hide your light under a bushel
jump a light
light a fire under sb
▪ They had come in the night and lit a fire under the stage.
light years ago
light years ahead/better etc than sth
light/comic relief
▪ After a day's work, it was a bit of light relief to use it.
▪ After this beginning some light relief must have been welcome.
▪ All we can say is that, between them, the team eventually raises £3,450 for Comic Relief charities.
▪ Cold people shake Comic Relief canisters.
▪ For comic relief, obviously; but we also suspect a topical reference worth considering as evidence in the dating game.
▪ Her only light relief was Tony, who took her out every night.
▪ If it afforded the guardians a little light relief, the minutes do not suggest that the complaint was taken anything but seriously.
▪ Then, for light relief, this page: murder and murder trials.
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
play a hose/light on sth
play of light
▪ I have a wonderful play of light and shade, and the tungsten light gives a very similar effect.
▪ Make notes as you watch the play of light in various areas as the sun tracks east to west across the sky.
pool of water/blood/light etc
▪ A pool of light, expanding circles, merging, dragging me down.
▪ A guard found him lying in a pool of blood, and a doctor saved him.
▪ After they are replaced, the spent fuel rods are cooled for several years in pools of water at the plants.
▪ His black telephone sat captive in a pool of light, ready for interrogation.
▪ She leaves the coach and wanders through fields for many miles until between trees she sees a deep black pool of water.
▪ The kind of pool of light depends on whether the bulb fitted inside is a spot, flood or an ordinary bulb.
▪ Then on the fifth day, mid-morning, a pool of light as pale and clear as moonstone appeared on the horizon.
▪ There was a pool of blood on the tarmac now, around his head.
punch sb's lights out
run a (red) light
▪ An old man who worked in a poultry store was stopped for running a light.
▪ For every motorist who runs a red light, there are five pedestrians who do it.
▪ It was going to sea with only its running lights on.
▪ Jones still faces a misdemeanor charge of reckless driving and an infraction for running a red light.
▪ Men are more likely to run a red light, forget to signal, or drink and drive.
▪ The running lights flashed off and a thick silence filled up the day.
▪ The bigger issue is, will San Franciscans still be allowed to run red lights across Market Street?
▪ When you run a red light, a few coins save a fine.
see the light
▪ But soon he could only see the lights of the boat in the distance.
▪ Each has attracted his or her share of supporters who could also see the light once it was pointed out to them.
▪ Five minutes later he saw the lights of a village pub.
▪ From two blocks away you can see the light radiating up into the sky.
▪ It was uncanny and Maggie was never so glad to see the light from her own room and get Ana back indoors.
▪ One must have experienced deeply, known greatness - seen the light, as he said.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ You were sitting in your seat, pressed back by the acceleration, and you saw the light beams curve.
see the light of day
▪ Business contracts go through armies of lawyers before they see the light of day.
▪ Most observers predict the bill won't see the light of day until at least January.
▪ And eventually, Guinness as we know it, rich subtle and dark, is ready to see the light of day.
▪ Get to the back of the drawers and cupboards - areas which don't often see the light of day.
▪ I am not too worried about the new council tax because I doubt whether it will see the light of day.
▪ I never sold a garment or got an order from this source, I wonder if they saw the light of day.
▪ Many of Brindley's ideas were regarded as the hair-brained schemes of a madman which would never see the light of day.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ The implication must be that a lot of bids are being planned but never see the light of day.
▪ There's so much good stuff that has never seen the light of day.
shed light
▪ A fretful wind was not enough to open them and shed light on the ruptured earth in which they lay.
▪ An analysis of the results should shed light on the workings of the Northern Ireland labour market.
▪ Brophy said the man was not considered a suspect, but investigators hope he can shed light on what started the blaze.
▪ Eastin and her task force hope to shed light on the challenge by early next year.
▪ Podesta's role sheds light on both questions.
▪ The extent of Hygeberht's authority perhaps sheds light on Offa's principal area of interest.
▪ Therefore they shed light on the comparative institutional questions with which we are concerned.
show sb in a good/bad etc light
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
string of pearls/lights/beads etc
▪ A string of lights on the prom Dancing mad in the storm Who lives in such a place?
▪ A string of pearls was around her neck, and the bones of her right hand clutched a Bible.
▪ Beads can choke babies if swallowed, and long strings of beads can also half-strangle older children.
▪ Careful inspection of the image showed what looked like a string of pearls embedded in a bright haze.
▪ There was a cavity beneath with a string of pearls in it.
▪ When the harbor across the bay becomes a string of lights, foghorns take up the bass.
the Southern Lights
throw a light/shadow
▪ Begin from a fighting stance, perhaps by throwing a light snap punch into the opponent's face from the front hand.
▪ But the flames were growing higher, throwing light, casting dancing shadows.
▪ Fossils do throw light on the history of the lateral line and tail.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ He uses relativity to throw light on time and eternity, and indeterminacy to comment on free will.
▪ The role of premises is to throw light on a subject; the role of evidences is to give weight to it.
▪ Understanding the nature and activities of such organisations helped throw light upon issues of town identity and representation.
▪ Where once they flew in such flocks that they threw shadows over the earth, they now survive in a few straggling colonies.
throw light on sth
▪ A comparison of the two will throw light on the crisis of conscience on both occasions.
▪ But I have not found anything in the careful judgment of Mustill L.J. which throws light on the issues presently under consideration.
▪ But my frantic, full-beamed Mayday signal only threw light on a de-iced porthole.
▪ Epidemiological studies sometimes threw light on preventable causes of cancer.
▪ Experiments to throw light on the processes at work must themselves be long-term.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ It also seeks to throw light on the role assumed by planters and the planting lobby in society at large.
▪ Life-positions throw light on why it is that some people tend to be winners and some losers in life.
trip the light fantastic
▪ Among their routines as they trip the light fantastic at the Dolphin Centre in Darlington are the old time and modern dances.
turn the light out
▪ He turned the light out as the clergyman left the room.
▪ I take the car up as far as it will go, then turn the lights out.
▪ They turned the lights out and sat in fear.
▪ Would you mind turning the light out, Robert?
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
light yogurt
▪ a light blue shirt
▪ a light breeze
▪ a light dessert
▪ a light white wine
▪ Heat rises because hot air is lighter than cold air.
▪ I try to have a light workout every day.
▪ Jones received only a light punishment.
▪ Modern tennis rackets are much lighter than old-fashioned wooden ones.
▪ She has light brown hair.
▪ She prepared a light lunch of salad and cheese.
▪ She was light as a feather to carry, and her hands were cold as ice.
▪ Some ministers are suggesting that there should be much lighter penalties for first-time offenders.
▪ The hallway led to a light and spacious studio.
▪ The kitchen is light and airy, with a fantastic view.
▪ The sentence was surprisingly light for such a serious offence.
▪ The studio was light and spacious.
▪ The traffic's much lighter than usual.
▪ They both have brown hair, but Tina's is slightly lighter.
▪ This is a nice jacket and we also do it in a light green.
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ All light aircraft maintenance workshops would most certainly have one for synchronizing and timing port and starboard magnetos on piston engines.
▪ Anyway, say packagers, their wrappings have become lighter.
▪ He opened the window and a light fresh breeze clutched at the curtains.
▪ He was making sure they were not exposed to any form of light source, however muted.
▪ M., the two cars sped along the autostrada toward Brescia in a light mist.
▪ Now it was light enough to leave.
▪ The lighter electro-mechanical version had 60 movements, 30 of them in the head, and was also cable-controlled.
▪ The best rocket exhaust is a very light, very hot gas.
III.verb
COLLOCATIONS FROM CORPUS
■ ADVERB
brightly
▪ The castle was brightly lit, she saw.
▪ They are surrounded by high metal fences, guarded by police all day, and brightly lit by spotlights through the night.
▪ Some other species are easily fooled by artificial light. Brightly lit city areas can give songbirds insomnia.
▪ The room was quite brightly lit by two gas brackets, one at each side of a shining black stove.
▪ The platform is brightly lit and filled with people waiting for the train to pull in.
▪ In the dressing room afterwards, brightly lit by the new Tantallum electric lamps, the atmosphere was just as electric.
▪ Instead, patronize brightly lit all-night delicatessens.
dimly
▪ Some streets are dimly lit by smoking torches, but the houses have only the shadowy light of candles and oil-lamps.
▪ An old wood stove decorates the center of the dimly lit hall.
▪ The stack swung in farther, revealing a long, damp passageway, dimly lit with strip lights.
▪ In her dimly lit living-room she had a gumball machine welcoming Kenny and me and the many other children who visited often.
▪ The room was dimly lit by indirect illumination.
▪ Mira Sorvino stars in this dim-witted, dimly lit monster flick about gigantic cockroaches living in the New York subway system.
▪ The sonar room was heavily insulated against all outside noise and dimly lit by subdued yellow lighting.
▪ Finally, you arrive in the paint scraper aisle, a dimly lit gulag in the rear of the store.
up
▪ Balancing awkwardly on her elbows, she lit up.
▪ Finally they turned out the lights and the screen lit up.
▪ Neighbours raised the alarm when they saw flames light up the early-hours darkness in Ferry Road, Edinburgh.
▪ He is outspoken, witty, occasionally vulgar, and when he smiles his whole face lights up.
▪ I had lit up a cigarette on leaving aunt's house, without realising it.
▪ Only when she mentions the name Miranda do their eyes light up with respect.
▪ Only long-stay patients will be able to light up after May 31.
▪ And the fog lighting up around him.
■ NOUN
candle
▪ The first candles were being lit, and the stars were out.
▪ A smoke candle was lit inside the test chamber.
▪ Last night Lois put a candle inside and lit up a happy mouth of three significant teeth.
▪ In a moment the candle was lit again, and I recognized my attacker.
▪ We groped around in the darkness, found a fat tallow candle and I lit it with my tinder.
▪ The candle was then lit by her partner, and placed between her lips.
▪ She was smiling and her whole face shone as if candles had been lit inside her.
cigar
▪ He lit one of the cigars which he smoked nonstop and blew rich smoke upwards.
▪ In the fresh air I light my first cigar of the day, and break the match before I drop it.
▪ He shouldn't be lighting a cigar.
▪ His own father would lie down after dinner, light a cigar, and listen to classical music.
▪ In a sullen silence he lit a cigar and helped himself to a stiff measure of brandy.
▪ Hill lit his first cigar of the afternoon and thought how popular his investigation should be.
▪ He shifted in his seat, half at his ease, and lit a cigar.
cigarette
▪ He declined the cigarette, he lit for himself a small cigar.
▪ She flopped down on an unmade king-sized bed, staring at me as she took up a cigarette and lit it.
▪ Dexter looked up expectantly, a loop of ash dangling from the end of the cigarette he had lit in her absence.
▪ He took out a cigarette and lit it, finding it hard to look into her probing eyes.
▪ Dunne rolled another cigarette and lit it.
fire
▪ Once the fire is lit, it has to be kept going and refuelled as necessary.
▪ His house looked mysterious by candlelight, as if small votive fires had been lit for some ritual.
▪ There was a scrape as she brought a taper forth from a tin box and leaned towards the fire to light it.
▪ When the fire was lit, the sorcerer threw a powder on the flames and said a magic charm.
▪ The fire was lit and our group won.
▪ In the morning, she rose early and already the fires were lit and breakfast cooking on the range.
▪ The hearth was drifted up with cinders that had been left uncleared when today's fire was lit.
flame
▪ The night sky was lit by flames from burning cars, the smoky air stinging with tear gas.
fuse
▪ Last month it lit the fuse on one of the biggest news stories of the year.
▪ United lit the fuse for a quality cup tie by giving everything they had against the big boys from the premier league.
▪ Increases light a fuse for smokers Cigarettes, beer and wine all go up.
▪ Pat Nevin lit the fuse by making it 2-0.
gas
▪ He lit the gas mantle and light beamed.
▪ Stephan lit the gas lantern and placed it near the door.
▪ The room was quite brightly lit by two gas brackets, one at each side of a shining black stove.
▪ She lit the gas and filled the kettle, then warmed her hands over the lid while the water boiled.
▪ He also lit the portable gas fire.
▪ She was able to light the gas and make tea in the big brown family teapot.
▪ She lights the gas stove, and makes herself a breakfast of muesli, wholemeal toast and decaffeinated coffee.
▪ He lit one of the gas mantles above the fireplace.
match
▪ I find her some matches and try and light one, but it won't light.
▪ Eulah Mae saw her sharply strike a match against a square match box to light a cigarette over a fresh beer.
▪ Thus my belief that striking the match will light it is justified inferentially.
▪ Louis struck a match and lit his pipe.
▪ The little match girl lit another match.
pipe
▪ Louis struck a match and lit his pipe.
▪ More solemn shadows flared as he lit his pipe, the sound of the drawing air strained and high.
▪ He lights a long pipe and draws in the smoke before handing it to me.
▪ He had difficulty sleeping and sometimes would call out in the night for me to help him light his pipe.
▪ Only Donald was moving in the room - lighting his pipe, shaking a paper open.
■ VERB
bring
▪ The chief means of proactive enforcement is routine sampling, which will bring to light or confirm the existence of persistent pollutions.
▪ It brought to light chronic problems with staff and aging equipment.
▪ This programme of research has already brought to light unnoticed phenomena of children's different abilities to communicate in the classroom.
▪ These three cases are instances of a civilization working over its own heritage something rarely brought fully to light.
▪ The film also brings to light the fascinating ideological battles that took place within the party.
▪ Identification Definitions of pollution are bound up with the process by which pollution is formally brought to light and identified.
▪ This brings to light a characteristic which most Constitutions exhibit.
▪ There are still other texts which have yet to be critically edited and brought to light.
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ray of hope/light etc
▪ Amid the crushing disappointment of the general election there was a ray of light for the Conservatives.
▪ Besides, today there had been a ray of hope.
▪ But only when a ray of light attempts to pierce this darkness does the real, eerie action unroll.
▪ But the Red Or Dead catwalk show offered a ray of hope.
▪ Each time a ray of light passes through a lens it is slightly weakened.
▪ The Government's resignation is a victory, a ray of hope to take into the dark days ahead.
ambient temperature/light etc
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ If you space heat then you will have an ambient temperature of 75-80°F and even higher humidity.
▪ It really comes into its own with flash as the metering balances the flash against the ambient lighting conditions with great results.
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ The ambient temperature for each day of the study was determined from local weekly weather statistics.
▪ The ambient temperature in Celsius is roughly equal to the number of cricket chirps in 8 seconds plus 5.
at first light
▪ The search continued at first light.
▪ They left camp at first light and were in the mountains by nightfall.
▪ A small flock of evening grosbeaks flew over, and at first light I heard chickadees and goldfinches.
▪ It was black as night at new moon and white as frost at first light.
▪ Mountain rescue teams continued the hunt overnight, and a full-scale search resumed at first light.
▪ The ambush would leave its position the next morning, at first light, to return.
▪ The Caribou took off at first light.
▪ We have had trouble at first light with the Khmer Rouge.
be all sweetness and light
▪ The negotiations were not all sweetness and light.
big/light/fussy etc eater
▪ During the time she was living with the Abramses, Katelyn was happy and a big eater, Carter said.
▪ While never a big eater, he did tend to snack it through the day and night.
drenched in/with light
give sb/sth the green light
▪ The board just gave us the green light to begin research.
▪ Doctors gave him the green light yesterday to start against New Orleans on Sunday night.
▪ Everyone has given it the green light.
guiding light/hand/star
▪ And that is what Aeneas's young son did under the guiding hand of Alecto.
▪ Eddie was his hero, his guiding light.
▪ Father Peter, its guiding light, was also its provider of funds and sustenance.
▪ That will be the guiding light of the next Labour government.
▪ To followers, he is more than just a guiding light - he is the Messiah.
▪ Under Mr Yarrow's guiding hand, the reputation of the school was untarnished, these five long years.
hide your light under a bushel
in the cold light of day
▪ I knew that, in the cold light of day, he held all the aces.
▪ Night-time madness isn't appealing, seen in the cold light of day.
leading light
▪ Another was a leading light opera singer in the local community.
▪ By now, Braudel had become one of its leading lights, and from 1956 to 1968 he was virtually its editor.
▪ Harrison, a man of simple birth and high intelligence, crossed swords with the leading lights of his day.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
▪ The merchants were the leading lights of the popolo grasso or rich bourgeoisie.
▪ This victory may set Stretch up with a world-title elimination fight with Britain's other leading light middleweight, Chris Pyatt.
light a fire under sb
▪ They had come in the night and lit a fire under the stage.
light years ago
light years ahead/better etc than sth
light/comic relief
▪ After a day's work, it was a bit of light relief to use it.
▪ After this beginning some light relief must have been welcome.
▪ All we can say is that, between them, the team eventually raises £3,450 for Comic Relief charities.
▪ Cold people shake Comic Relief canisters.
▪ For comic relief, obviously; but we also suspect a topical reference worth considering as evidence in the dating game.
▪ Her only light relief was Tony, who took her out every night.
▪ If it afforded the guardians a little light relief, the minutes do not suggest that the complaint was taken anything but seriously.
▪ Then, for light relief, this page: murder and murder trials.
light/fair/dark complected
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
naked light/flame/sword etc
▪ A very powerful naked light bulb hung from the office ceiling.
▪ Both men were armed, each carrying a naked sword and dirk.
▪ He is like a naked light.
▪ Obviously this is untrue - it is not the naked light that Blanche can not stand, it is the truth.
▪ She likes to cover up the truth like she covers over the naked light.
▪ She turned, all flaxen and pink and white, haloed by the naked light bulbs round the mirror.
▪ This gives a double meaning to Blanche's hatred of naked light.
play of light
▪ I have a wonderful play of light and shade, and the tungsten light gives a very similar effect.
▪ Make notes as you watch the play of light in various areas as the sun tracks east to west across the sky.
pool of water/blood/light etc
▪ A pool of light, expanding circles, merging, dragging me down.
▪ A guard found him lying in a pool of blood, and a doctor saved him.
▪ After they are replaced, the spent fuel rods are cooled for several years in pools of water at the plants.
▪ His black telephone sat captive in a pool of light, ready for interrogation.
▪ She leaves the coach and wanders through fields for many miles until between trees she sees a deep black pool of water.
▪ The kind of pool of light depends on whether the bulb fitted inside is a spot, flood or an ordinary bulb.
▪ Then on the fifth day, mid-morning, a pool of light as pale and clear as moonstone appeared on the horizon.
▪ There was a pool of blood on the tarmac now, around his head.
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
string of pearls/lights/beads etc
▪ A string of lights on the prom Dancing mad in the storm Who lives in such a place?
▪ A string of pearls was around her neck, and the bones of her right hand clutched a Bible.
▪ Beads can choke babies if swallowed, and long strings of beads can also half-strangle older children.
▪ Careful inspection of the image showed what looked like a string of pearls embedded in a bright haze.
▪ There was a cavity beneath with a string of pearls in it.
▪ When the harbor across the bay becomes a string of lights, foghorns take up the bass.
the Southern Lights
the bright lights
▪ First I turned off the brightest lights.
▪ He gestured toward the street, the bright lights of Osaka shining before us.
▪ In the bright lights of the foyer his face was clearly illuminated.
▪ Instead Elizabeth spent a year at business college in St Albans before joining the bright lights of London's magazine world.
▪ It had to be the cold air and the bright lights against the darkness.
▪ Self- imposed pressure Lately, she has wondered if her message is getting lost in the bright lights of television.
▪ Under the bright lights in the train, both boy and man look pale, lifeless.
▪ Young Gilbey's passion was cars and he skipped going to university to move to the bright lights of London.
EXAMPLES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
▪ I leaned forward to light her cigarette.
▪ Osborn's Christmas display is lighted by some 30,000 colored bulbs.
▪ Ricky sat down and lit a cigarette.
▪ The fire won't light.
▪ The old man lit a cigarette and took a puff.
▪ The old man struck a match and lit his pipe.
▪ The room was lit by dozens of candles.
▪ We searched around for twigs and fallen branches, so we could light a fire.
▪ What are you going to use to light the stage?
EXAMPLES FROM CORPUS
▪ From the other, funnels of smoke poured with flames licking behind them, lighting the dark smoke garishly.
▪ She waved for them to start and felt her face flush as she sat down and lit the candle.
▪ The airline clearly agrees and is resolved to defend the freedom to light up.
▪ The corridor inside was a grey conduit for numerous pipes and fittings, lit by plain white bulbs.
▪ They could light no fire, and Ratagan prophesied gloomily that their camp that night would be cheerless.
IV.adverb
PHRASES FROM OTHER ENTRIES
a ray of hope/light etc
▪ Amid the crushing disappointment of the general election there was a ray of light for the Conservatives.
▪ Besides, today there had been a ray of hope.
▪ But only when a ray of light attempts to pierce this darkness does the real, eerie action unroll.
▪ But the Red Or Dead catwalk show offered a ray of hope.
▪ Each time a ray of light passes through a lens it is slightly weakened.
▪ The Government's resignation is a victory, a ray of hope to take into the dark days ahead.
ambient temperature/light etc
▪ Homeothermy or Homoiothermy Temperature regulation in tachymetabolic species in which core temperatures remain roughly steady despite ambient temperature changes.
▪ If you space heat then you will have an ambient temperature of 75-80°F and even higher humidity.
▪ It really comes into its own with flash as the metering balances the flash against the ambient lighting conditions with great results.
▪ Odour emissions are affected by wind direction, temperature inversion, ambient temperatures and humidity.
▪ The ambient temperature for each day of the study was determined from local weekly weather statistics.
▪ The ambient temperature in Celsius is roughly equal to the number of cricket chirps in 8 seconds plus 5.
at first light
▪ The search continued at first light.
▪ They left camp at first light and were in the mountains by nightfall.
▪ A small flock of evening grosbeaks flew over, and at first light I heard chickadees and goldfinches.
▪ It was black as night at new moon and white as frost at first light.
▪ Mountain rescue teams continued the hunt overnight, and a full-scale search resumed at first light.
▪ The ambush would leave its position the next morning, at first light, to return.
▪ The Caribou took off at first light.
▪ We have had trouble at first light with the Khmer Rouge.
be all sweetness and light
▪ The negotiations were not all sweetness and light.
be bathed in light/sunshine etc
▪ He threw open a side door off the first-floor hall, and we were bathed in light.
big/light/fussy etc eater
▪ During the time she was living with the Abramses, Katelyn was happy and a big eater, Carter said.
▪ While never a big eater, he did tend to snack it through the day and night.
cast light on/onto sth
▪ The convergence of the techniques will cast light on perspectives and how they are controlled.
▪ The different ways in which superantigens activate T cells casts light on the pathogenesis of infectious disease.
▪ The incident has cast light on the creeping privatisation of the drug war.
▪ The investigation explores the possibility of using probate inventories to cast light on this and related questions.
▪ We use this to cast light on a metaphor of which we are given no other interpretation.
dim your headlights/lights
dip your headlights/lights
▪ He put his foot on the accelerator and dipped his headlights.
drenched in/with light
give sb/sth the green light
▪ The board just gave us the green light to begin research.
▪ Doctors gave him the green light yesterday to start against New Orleans on Sunday night.
▪ Everyone has given it the green light.
guiding light/hand/star
▪ And that is what Aeneas's young son did under the guiding hand of Alecto.
▪ Eddie was his hero, his guiding light.
▪ Father Peter, its guiding light, was also its provider of funds and sustenance.
▪ That will be the guiding light of the next Labour government.
▪ To followers, he is more than just a guiding light - he is the Messiah.
▪ Under Mr Yarrow's guiding hand, the reputation of the school was untarnished, these five long years.
hide your light under a bushel
in the cold light of day
▪ I knew that, in the cold light of day, he held all the aces.
▪ Night-time madness isn't appealing, seen in the cold light of day.
jump a light
leading light
▪ Another was a leading light opera singer in the local community.
▪ By now, Braudel had become one of its leading lights, and from 1956 to 1968 he was virtually its editor.
▪ Harrison, a man of simple birth and high intelligence, crossed swords with the leading lights of his day.
▪ On renouncing alcohol he was pardoned and he set sail for Darlington where he became a leading light in the Society.
▪ She loves gym workouts, swimming and playing netball - she is a leading light in a local women's team.
▪ The merchants were the leading lights of the popolo grasso or rich bourgeoisie.
▪ This victory may set Stretch up with a world-title elimination fight with Britain's other leading light middleweight, Chris Pyatt.
light a fire under sb
▪ They had come in the night and lit a fire under the stage.
light years ago
light years ahead/better etc than sth
light/comic relief
▪ After a day's work, it was a bit of light relief to use it.
▪ After this beginning some light relief must have been welcome.
▪ All we can say is that, between them, the team eventually raises £3,450 for Comic Relief charities.
▪ Cold people shake Comic Relief canisters.
▪ For comic relief, obviously; but we also suspect a topical reference worth considering as evidence in the dating game.
▪ Her only light relief was Tony, who took her out every night.
▪ If it afforded the guardians a little light relief, the minutes do not suggest that the complaint was taken anything but seriously.
▪ Then, for light relief, this page: murder and murder trials.
light/fair/dark complected
make short/light work of sth
▪ But she made light work of polishing off the shopping at a supermarket near her West London home.
▪ Carmen would have made short work of Michael too.
▪ Fourth placed Guisborough made short work of the opposition at Saltburn.
▪ Guernsey made short work of the opposition when they won the event on home soil in 1990.
▪ It is fair to warn anglers that thousands of crabs soon make short work of rag and lugworm.
▪ It made short work of our Windows performance tests, WinTach, clocking up an impressive index of over 9.3.
▪ The second game we pull away early and make short work of it.
▪ Willie Thorne made light work of the promising Nottinghamshire youngster, Anthony Hamilton, as he eased into the last 16.
naked light/flame/sword etc
▪ A very powerful naked light bulb hung from the office ceiling.
▪ Both men were armed, each carrying a naked sword and dirk.
▪ He is like a naked light.
▪ Obviously this is untrue - it is not the naked light that Blanche can not stand, it is the truth.
▪ She likes to cover up the truth like she covers over the naked light.
▪ She turned, all flaxen and pink and white, haloed by the naked light bulbs round the mirror.
▪ This gives a double meaning to Blanche's hatred of naked light.
play a hose/light on sth
play of light
▪ I have a wonderful play of light and shade, and the tungsten light gives a very similar effect.
▪ Make notes as you watch the play of light in various areas as the sun tracks east to west across the sky.
pool of water/blood/light etc
▪ A pool of light, expanding circles, merging, dragging me down.
▪ A guard found him lying in a pool of blood, and a doctor saved him.
▪ After they are replaced, the spent fuel rods are cooled for several years in pools of water at the plants.
▪ His black telephone sat captive in a pool of light, ready for interrogation.
▪ She leaves the coach and wanders through fields for many miles until between trees she sees a deep black pool of water.
▪ The kind of pool of light depends on whether the bulb fitted inside is a spot, flood or an ordinary bulb.
▪ Then on the fifth day, mid-morning, a pool of light as pale and clear as moonstone appeared on the horizon.
▪ There was a pool of blood on the tarmac now, around his head.
punch sb's lights out
run a (red) light
▪ An old man who worked in a poultry store was stopped for running a light.
▪ For every motorist who runs a red light, there are five pedestrians who do it.
▪ It was going to sea with only its running lights on.
▪ Jones still faces a misdemeanor charge of reckless driving and an infraction for running a red light.
▪ Men are more likely to run a red light, forget to signal, or drink and drive.
▪ The running lights flashed off and a thick silence filled up the day.
▪ The bigger issue is, will San Franciscans still be allowed to run red lights across Market Street?
▪ When you run a red light, a few coins save a fine.
see the light
▪ But soon he could only see the lights of the boat in the distance.
▪ Each has attracted his or her share of supporters who could also see the light once it was pointed out to them.
▪ Five minutes later he saw the lights of a village pub.
▪ From two blocks away you can see the light radiating up into the sky.
▪ It was uncanny and Maggie was never so glad to see the light from her own room and get Ana back indoors.
▪ One must have experienced deeply, known greatness - seen the light, as he said.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ You were sitting in your seat, pressed back by the acceleration, and you saw the light beams curve.
see the light of day
▪ Business contracts go through armies of lawyers before they see the light of day.
▪ Most observers predict the bill won't see the light of day until at least January.
▪ And eventually, Guinness as we know it, rich subtle and dark, is ready to see the light of day.
▪ Get to the back of the drawers and cupboards - areas which don't often see the light of day.
▪ I am not too worried about the new council tax because I doubt whether it will see the light of day.
▪ I never sold a garment or got an order from this source, I wonder if they saw the light of day.
▪ Many of Brindley's ideas were regarded as the hair-brained schemes of a madman which would never see the light of day.
▪ Sadly, for it was a lively, largely autobiographical piece, it would never see the light of day.
▪ The implication must be that a lot of bids are being planned but never see the light of day.
▪ There's so much good stuff that has never seen the light of day.
shed light
▪ A fretful wind was not enough to open them and shed light on the ruptured earth in which they lay.
▪ An analysis of the results should shed light on the workings of the Northern Ireland labour market.
▪ Brophy said the man was not considered a suspect, but investigators hope he can shed light on what started the blaze.
▪ Eastin and her task force hope to shed light on the challenge by early next year.
▪ Podesta's role sheds light on both questions.
▪ The extent of Hygeberht's authority perhaps sheds light on Offa's principal area of interest.
▪ Therefore they shed light on the comparative institutional questions with which we are concerned.
show sb in a good/bad etc light
streak of lightning/fire/light etc
▪ A streak of lightning split the sky.
▪ Sometimes there is hope, a streak of light, a blur on a piece of film.
▪ The three women were wreaking havoc with their guns that fired streaks of light.
▪ There was another streak of lightning overhead.
string of pearls/lights/beads etc
▪ A string of lights on the prom Dancing mad in the storm Who lives in such a place?
▪ A string of pearls was around her neck, and the bones of her right hand clutched a Bible.
▪ Beads can choke babies if swallowed, and long strings of beads can also half-strangle older children.
▪ Careful inspection of the image showed what looked like a string of pearls embedded in a bright haze.
▪ There was a cavity beneath with a string of pearls in it.
▪ When the harbor across the bay becomes a string of lights, foghorns take up the bass.
the Southern Lights
the bright lights
▪ First I turned off the brightest lights.
▪ He gestured toward the street, the bright lights of Osaka shining before us.
▪ In the bright lights of the foyer his face was clearly illuminated.
▪ Instead Elizabeth spent a year at business college in St Albans before joining the bright lights of London's magazine world.
▪ It had to be the cold air and the bright lights against the darkness.
▪ Self- imposed pressure Lately, she has wondered if her message is getting lost in the bright lights of television.
▪ Under the bright lights in the train, both boy and man look pale, lifeless.
▪ Young Gilbey's passion was cars and he skipped going to university to move to the bright lights of London.
throw a light/shadow
▪ Begin from a fighting stance, perhaps by throwing a light snap punch into the opponent's face from the front hand.
▪ But the flames were growing higher, throwing light, casting dancing shadows.
▪ Fossils do throw light on the history of the lateral line and tail.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ He uses relativity to throw light on time and eternity, and indeterminacy to comment on free will.
▪ The role of premises is to throw light on a subject; the role of evidences is to give weight to it.
▪ Understanding the nature and activities of such organisations helped throw light upon issues of town identity and representation.
▪ Where once they flew in such flocks that they threw shadows over the earth, they now survive in a few straggling colonies.
throw light on sth
▪ A comparison of the two will throw light on the crisis of conscience on both occasions.
▪ But I have not found anything in the careful judgment of Mustill L.J. which throws light on the issues presently under consideration.
▪ But my frantic, full-beamed Mayday signal only threw light on a de-iced porthole.
▪ Epidemiological studies sometimes threw light on preventable causes of cancer.
▪ Experiments to throw light on the processes at work must themselves be long-term.
▪ Geographical comparison of patterns of lawbreaking sometimes throws light on more general differences in social and economic conditions.
▪ It also seeks to throw light on the role assumed by planters and the planting lobby in society at large.
▪ Life-positions throw light on why it is that some people tend to be winners and some losers in life.
trip the light fantastic
▪ Among their routines as they trip the light fantastic at the Dolphin Centre in Darlington are the old time and modern dances.
turn the light out
▪ He turned the light out as the clergyman left the room.
▪ I take the car up as far as it will go, then turn the lights out.
▪ They turned the lights out and sat in fear.
▪ Would you mind turning the light out, Robert?
Wikipedia

Light (KMFDM song)

"Light" is a song by industrial rock band KMFDM from their 1993 album Angst. The single was first released in 1994 and contains nine different remixes of the song. "Light" peaked at No. 31 on the Billboard Dance/Club Play Songs Chart in May 1994. The single was re-released as a 7" in 2009, and the song was remixed and released as "Light 2010" on December 17 2010.

Light (disambiguation)

Light is an electromagnetic radiation, part of which stimulates the sense of vision.

Light may also refer to:

Light (Jeff Deyo album)

Light is a 2003 album by American contemporary Christian music artist, Jeff Deyo.

Light (novel)

Light is a science fiction novel by M. John Harrison published in 2002. It received the James Tiptree, Jr. Award and a BSFA nomination in 2002, and was shortlisted for the Arthur C. Clarke Award in 2003.

Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The word usually refers to visible light, which is visible to the human eye and is responsible for the sense of sight. Visible light is usually defined as having wavelengths in the range of 400–700 nanometres (nm), or 4.00 × 10 to 7.00 × 10 m, between the infrared (with longer wavelengths) and the ultraviolet (with shorter wavelengths). This wavelength means a frequency range of roughly 430–750 terahertz (THz).

The main source of light on Earth is the Sun. Sunlight provides the energy that green plants use to create sugars mostly in the form of starches, which release energy into the living things that digest them. This process of photosynthesis provides virtually all the energy used by living things. Historically, another important source of light for humans has been fire, from ancient campfires to modern kerosene lamps. With the development of electric lights and power systems, electric lighting has effectively replaced firelight. Some species of animals generate their own light, a process called bioluminescence. For example, fireflies use light to locate mates, and vampire squids use it to hide themselves from prey.

The primary properties of visible light are intensity, propagation direction, frequency or wavelength spectrum, and polarization, while its speed in a vacuum, 299,792,458 metres per second, is one of the fundamental constants of nature. Visible light, as with all types of electromagnetic radiation (EMR), is experimentally found to always move at this speed in a vacuum.

In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not. In this sense, gamma rays, X-rays, microwaves and radio waves are also light. Like all types of light, visible light is emitted and absorbed in tiny "packets" called photons and exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

Light (automobile)

The Light was an automobile built in Detroit, Michigan by the Light Motor Car Company in 1914. The Light was a conventional vehicle with a six-cylinder, 30 hp engine. It came as a touring model selling for $1,250.

LIGHT (protein)

LIGHT, also known as tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14), is a secreted protein of the TNF superfamily. It is recognized by herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM), as well as decoy receptor 3.

Light (Matisyahu album)

Light is the third album by reggae singer Matisyahu, which was released on August 25, 2009. It was anticipated since his major label debut Youth released three years before. The album has been highly successful in the reggae world, holding the top spot on the billboard reggae albums chart for 34 weeks.

Light (journal)

Light (formerly Light: A Quarterly of Light Verse) is an online journal which bills itself as "America's oldest and best-known journal of light verse."

Light was founded as a print journal in 1992 by retired postal worker John Mella. Mella personally published the journal until 2008, when he founded the non-profit Foundation for Light Verse with a $500,000 gift from poet Joyce La Mers. The Foundation, headed by Mella, took over publication of the journal. After Mella's death in 2012, the magazine was relaunched as an online-only, semiannual publication, edited by his handpicked successor, poet Melissa Balmain. The all-volunteer staff includes poets Kevin Durkin, Julie Kane, Bob McKenty, and Gail White.

The verse in each issue begins with a feature on a writer of light verse. Sections in between vary from issue to issue and may be organized by author, or according to themes. A recurring column called "Historical and Hysterical" was introduced by poet A. M. Juster in Summer '13. The magazine has included the verse of Wendy Cope, Tom Disch, X. J. Kennedy, John Updike, and Richard Wilbur, among many others.

Light (surname)

Light is a surname of English language.

Light may refer to:

  • Alan Light (born c. 1966), US journalist and music reviewer
  • Alan L. Light (born 1953), founder of the Comics Buyer's Guide
  • Bill Light and Billy Light - see William Light (disambiguation)
  • Danny Light (1948-2014) a professional footballer.
  • Douglas Light (fl. 1990s-present), US author
  • Elisha Light (1873–1952), English athlete in cricket
  • Enoch Light (1907–1978), classical violinist and bandleader
  • Francis Light (1740–1794), founder of the British colony of Penang
  • H. Wayne Light (born 1945), US academic and author
  • James Light (born c. 1803) English athlete in cricket
  • James F. Light (1921-2002), US literature scholar and university VP & provost
  • Jay Light (musician) (fl. 1970s-present), US musician
  • Jay Owen Light (fl. 1990s-present), US academic and university dean
  • Jennifer S. Light (fl. 2000s), US female academic and author
  • John Light (disambiguation)
  • Judith Light (born 1949), US television actress
  • Kevin Light (born 1979), Canadian athlete in rowing
  • Matt Light (born 1978), US athlete in football
  • Paul Light (fl. 1980s-present), English academic and university chancellor
  • Richard Upjohn Light (1902–1994), US neurosurgeon, aviator, cinematographer, and president of the American Geographical Society
  • Timothy Light (born 1938) professor emeritus at Western Michigan University
  • Walter Light (1927–1979), US musician
  • Walter Frederick Light (1923–1996), Canadian businessman
  • William Light (disambiguation)
  • Zach Light (born 1974), US athlete in martial arts
  • Zack Light, Texas and Kansas outlaw, and a friend of Doc Middleton

Fictional People

  • Doctor Light - Three comicbook individuals.

Light (Music for Pleasure song)

"Light" is a single by Music for Pleasure and was released in 1982.

Light (company)

Light is an American digital photography company that has devised a multi-lens and multi-sensor camera that is eventually planned for embedding in smartphones and mobile devices. Its announced product, the L16, is a standalone version with 16 camera modules. The technology is said to be comparable to the quality of DSLR cameras but in a smaller form factor. It plans to eventually provide mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets with higher-quality photo capabilities and true optical zoom. Light recently entered into a deal with smartphone manufacturer, Foxconn, to allow them to sell products that include Light's technology.

Light (DakhaBrakha album)

Light is the third studio album by the Ukrainian folk music band DakhaBrakha. It was released in 2010.

Light (web browser)

Light, formerly known as Firefox Light, is a free and open-source web browser based on Firefox. Light is available for the Windows, OS X and Linux operating systems. It differs from Firefox by being built for performance, which it achieves by removing several of Firefox's built in components, including the crash reporter, safe browsing, spell checker, development tools, and support for various types of video and audio media.

WordNet

light

  1. adj. of comparatively little physical weight or density; "a light load"; "magnesium is a light metal--having a specific gravity of 1.74 at 20 degrees C" [ant: heavy]

  2. (used of color) having a relatively small amount of coloring agent; "light blue"; "light colors such as pastels"; "a light-colored powder" [syn: light-colored] [ant: dark]

  3. of the military or industry; using (or being) relatively small or light arms or equipment; "light infantry"; "light cavalry"; "light industry"; "light weapons" [ant: heavy]

  4. not great in degree or quantity or number; "a light sentence"; "a light accent"; "casualties were light"; "light snow was falling"; "light misty rain"; "light smoke from the chimney" [ant: heavy]

  5. psychologically light; especially free from sadness or troubles; "a light heart" [ant: heavy]

  6. characterized by or emitting light; "a room that is light when the shutters are open"; "the inside of the house was airy and light" [ant: dark]

  7. used of vowels or syllables; pronounced with little or no stress; "a syllable that ends in a short vowel is a light syllable"; "a weak stress on the second syllable" [syn: unaccented, weak]

  8. easily assimilated in the alimentary canal; not rich or heavily seasoned; "a light diet"

  9. (used of soil) loose and large-grained in consistency; "light sandy soil" [syn: friable, sandy]

  10. (of sound or color) free from anything that dulls or dims; "efforts to obtain a clean bass in orchestral recordings"; "clear laughter like a waterfall"; "clear reds and blues"; "a light lilting voice like a silver bell" [syn: clean, clear, unclouded]

  11. moving easily and quickly; nimble; "the dancer was light and graceful"; "a lightsome buoyant step"; "walked with a light tripping step" [syn: lightsome, tripping]

  12. demanding little effort; not burdensome; "light housework"; "light exercise"

  13. of little intensity or power or force; "the light touch of her fingers"; "a light breeze" [ant: heavy]

  14. (physics, chemistry) not having atomic weight greater than average; "light water is ordinary water" [ant: heavy]

  15. weak and likely to lose consciousness; "suddenly felt faint from the pain"; "was sick and faint from hunger"; "felt light in the head"; "a swooning fit"; "light-headed with wine"; "light-headed from lack of sleep" [syn: faint, swooning, light-headed, lightheaded]

  16. very thin and insubstantial; "thin paper"; "flimsy voile"; "light summer dresses" [syn: flimsy]

  17. marked by temperance in indulgence; "abstemious meals"; "a light eater"; "a light smoker"; "ate a light supper" [syn: abstemious, light(a)]

  18. less than the correct or legal or full amount often deliberately so; "a light pound"; "a scant cup of sugar"; "regularly gives short weight" [syn: scant(p), short]

  19. having little importance; "losing his job was no light matter"

  20. intended primarily as entertainment; not serious or profound; "light verse"; "a light comedy"

  21. silly or trivial; "idle pleasure"; "light banter"; "light idle chatter" [syn: idle]

  22. having a spongy or flaky texture; well-leavened; "light pastries"

  23. designed for ease of movement or to carry little weight; "light aircraft"; "a light truck"

  24. having relatively few calories; "diet cola"; "light (or lite) beer"; "lite (or light) mayonnaise"; "a low-cal diet" [syn: lite, low-cal]

  25. (of sleep) easily disturbed; "in a light doze"; "a light sleeper"; "a restless wakeful night" [syn: wakeful]

  26. casual and unrestrained in sexual behavior; "her easy virtue"; "he was told to avoid loose (or light) women"; "wanton behavior" [syn: easy, loose, promiscuous, sluttish, wanton]

  27. [also: lit]

light

  1. adv. with few burdens; "experienced travellers travel light" [syn: lightly]

  2. [also: lit]

light

  1. n. (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window" [syn: visible light, visible radiation]

  2. any device serving as a source of illumination; "he stopped the car and turned off the lights" [syn: light source]

  3. a particular perspective or aspect of a situation; "although he saw it in a different light, he still did not understand"

  4. the quality of being luminous; emitting or reflecting light; "its luminosity is measured relative to that of our sun" [syn: luminosity, brightness, brightness level, luminance, luminousness]

  5. an illuminated area; "he stepped into the light"

  6. a condition of spiritual awareness; divine illumination; "follow God's light" [syn: illumination]

  7. the visual effect of illumination on objects or scenes as created in pictures; "he could paint the lightest light and the darkest dark" [syn: lightness]

  8. a person regarded very fondly; "the light of my life"

  9. mental understanding as an enlightening experience; "he finally saw the light"; "can you shed light on this problem?"

  10. having abundant light or illumination; "they played as long as it was light"; "as long as the lighting was good" [syn: lighting] [ant: dark]

  11. public awareness; "it brought the scandal to light"

  12. brightness and animation of countenance; "he had a sparkle in his eye" [syn: sparkle, spark]

  13. a divine presence believed by Quakers to enlighten and guide the soul [syn: Inner Light, Light Within, Christ Within]

  14. a visual warning signal; "they saw the light of the beacon"; "there was a light at every corner"

  15. a device for lighting or igniting fuel or charges or fires; "do you have a light?" [syn: lighter, igniter, ignitor]

  16. [also: lit]

light

  1. v. make lighter or brighter; "This lamp lightens the room a bit" [syn: illume, illumine, light up, illuminate]

  2. begin to smoke; "After the meal, some of the diners lit up" [syn: light up, fire up]

  3. to come to rest, settle; "Misfortune lighted upon him" [syn: alight, perch]

  4. cause to start burning; subject to fire or great heat; "Great heat can ignite almost any dry matter"; "Light a cigarette" [syn: ignite] [ant: snuff out]

  5. fall to somebody by assignment or lot; "The task fell to me"; "It fell to me to notify the parents of the victims" [syn: fall]

  6. get off (a horse) [syn: unhorse, dismount, get off, get down]

  7. [also: lit]

Wiktionary

light

Etymology 1 n. (context uncountable English) The natural medium emanating from the Sun and other very hot sources (now recognised as electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength of 400-750 nm), within which vision is possible. Etymology 2

vb. 1 (context transitive English) To start (a fire). 2 (context transitive English) To set fire to; to set burning; to kindle. 3 (context transitive English) To illuminate. 4 (context intransitive English) To become ignited; to take fire. 5 To attend or conduct with a light; to show the way to by means of a light. Etymology 3

  1. 1 Having light. 2 pale in colour. Etymology 4

    a. 1 Of low weight; not heavy. 2 Lightly-built; designed for speed or small loads. 3 (senseid en having little force or momentum)Gentle; having little force or momentum. 4 Easy to endure or perform. 5 low in fat, calories, alcohol, salt, etc. 6 Unimportant, trivial, having little value or significance. 7 (context rail transport of a locomotive usually with "run" English) travelling with no carriages, wagons attached 8 (context obsolete English) unchaste, wanton. 9 Not heavily armed; armed with light weapons. 10 Not encumbered; unembarrassed; clear of impediments; hence, active; nimble; swift. 11 (context dated English) Easily influenced by trifling considerations; unsteady; unsettled; volatile. 12 Indulging in, or inclined to, levity; lacking dignity or solemnity; frivolous; airy. 13 Not quite sound or normal; somewhat impaired or deranged; dizzy; giddy. 14 Not of the legal, standard, or usual weight; clipped; diminished. 15 Easily interrupted by stimulation. adv. Carrying little. n. (context curling English) A stone that is not thrown hard enough. v

  2. 1 (context nautical English) To unload a ship, or to jettison material to make it lighter 2 To lighten; to ease of a burden; to take off. Etymology 5

    vb. 1 To find by chance. 2 (context archaic English) To alight; to land or come down.

The Collaborative International Dictionary

light

Wine \Wine\, n. [OE. win, AS. win, fr. L. vinum (cf. Icel. v[=i]n; all from the Latin); akin to Gr. o'i^nos, ?, and E. withy. Cf. Vine, Vineyard, Vinous, Withy.]

  1. The expressed juice of grapes, esp. when fermented; a beverage or liquor prepared from grapes by squeezing out their juice, and (usually) allowing it to ferment. ``Red wine of Gascoigne.''
    --Piers Plowman.

    Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging, and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.
    --Prov. xx. 1.

    Bacchus, that first from out the purple grape Crushed the sweet poison of misused wine.
    --Milton.

    Note: Wine is essentially a dilute solution of ethyl alcohol, containing also certain small quantities of ethers and ethereal salts which give character and bouquet. According to their color, strength, taste, etc., wines are called red, white, spirituous, dry, light, still, etc.

  2. A liquor or beverage prepared from the juice of any fruit or plant by a process similar to that for grape wine; as, currant wine; gooseberry wine; palm wine.

  3. The effect of drinking wine in excess; intoxication.

    Noah awoke from his wine.
    --Gen. ix. 2

  4. Birch wine, Cape wine, etc. See under Birch, Cape, etc. Spirit of wine. See under Spirit. To have drunk wine of ape or To have drunk wine ape, to be so drunk as to be foolish. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Wine acid. (Chem.) See Tartaric acid, under Tartaric. Wine apple (Bot.), a large red apple, with firm flesh and a rich, vinous flavor. Wine fly (Zo["o]l.), small two-winged fly of the genus Piophila, whose larva lives in wine, cider, and other fermented liquors. Wine grower, one who cultivates a vineyard and makes wine. Wine measure, the measure by which wines and other spirits are sold, smaller than beer measure. Wine merchant, a merchant who deals in wines. Wine of opium (Pharm.), a solution of opium in aromatized sherry wine, having the same strength as ordinary laudanum; -- also Sydenham's laudanum. Wine press, a machine or apparatus in which grapes are pressed to extract their juice. Wine skin, a bottle or bag of skin, used, in various countries, for carrying wine. Wine stone, a kind of crust deposited in wine casks. See 1st Tartar, 1. Wine vault.

    1. A vault where wine is stored.

    2. A place where wine is served at the bar, or at tables; a dramshop.
      --Dickens.

      Wine vinegar, vinegar made from wine.

      Wine whey, whey made from milk coagulated by the use of wine.

Douglas Harper's Etymology Dictionary

light

"not heavy," from Old English leoht "not heavy, light in weight; easy, trifling; quick, agile," from Proto-Germanic *lingkhtaz (cognates: Old Norse lettr, Swedish lätt, Old Frisian, Middle Dutch licht, German leicht, Gothic leihts), from PIE root *legwh- "not heavy, having little weight" (cognates: Latin levis "light," Old Irish lu "small;" see lever).\n

\nThe notion in make light of (1520s) is of "unimportance." Alternative spelling lite, the darling of advertisers, is first recorded 1962. The adverb is Old English leohte, from the adjective. Light-skirts "woman of easy virtue" is attested from 1590s. To make light of is from 1520s.

light

"touch down," from Old English lihtan "to alight; alleviate, leave," from Proto-Germanic *linkhtijan, literally "to make light," from *lingkhtaz "not heavy" (see light (adj.1)). Apparently the ground sense is "to dismount a horse, etc., and thus relieve it of one's weight." To light out "leave hastily" is 1870, from a nautical meaning "move out, move heavy objects," of unknown origin but perhaps belonging to this word (compare lighter (n.1)).

light

"to illuminate, fill with brightness," Old English lyhtan, common Germanic (cognates: Old Saxon liohtian, Old High German liuhtan, German leuchten, Gothic liuhtjan "to light"), from source of from light (n.). Related: Lighted; lighting.

light

"not dark," Old English leoht, common Germanic (cognates: Old Saxon and Old High German lioht, Old Frisian liacht, German licht "bright," from the source of Old English leoht (see light (n.)). Meaning "pale-hued" is from 1540s.

light

"brightness, radiant energy," Old English leht, earlier leoht "light, daylight," from Proto-Germanic *leukhtam (cognates: Old Saxon lioht, Old Frisian liacht, Middle Dutch lucht, Dutch licht, Old High German lioht, German Licht, Gothic liuhaþ "light"), from PIE *leuk- "light, brightness" (cognates: Sanskrit rocate "shines;" Armenian lois "light," lusin "moon;" Greek leukos "bright, shining, white;" Latin lucere "to shine," lux "light," lucidus "clear;" Old Church Slavonic luci "light;" Lithuanian laukas "pale;" Welsh llug "gleam, glimmer;" Old Irish loche "lightning," luchair "brightness;" Hittite lukezi "is bright").\n

\nThe -gh- was an Anglo-French scribal attempt to render the Germanic hard -h- sound, which has since disappeared from this word. The figurative spiritual sense was in Old English; the sense of "mental illumination" is first recorded mid-15c. Meaning "something used for igniting" is from 1680s. Meaning "a consideration which puts something in a certain view (as in in light of) is from 1680s. Something that's a joy and a delight has been the light of (someone's) eyes since Old English:\n\nÐu eart dohtor min, minra eagna leoht [Juliana].\n\nTo see the light "come into the world" is from 1680s; later in a Christian sense.

Gazetteer

Usage examples of "light".

But it must be understood that this refers to one who had made her abjuration as one manifestly taken in heresy, or as one strongly suspected of heresy, and not to one who has so done as being under only a light suspicion.

Two of the towers were ablaze, black smoke pouring from their arrow loops and twisting in the light wind as it rose into the sky.

Behind the closed gates, I could see that the house was ablaze with light and merriment.

I have brought to light a monstrous abnormality, but I did it for the sake of knowledge.

The musty auditorium was a dimly lit torture chamber, filled with the droning dull voice punctuated by the sharp screams of the electrified, the sea of nodding heads abob here and there with painfully leaping figures.

Trajan from the glimmerings of an abridgment, or the doubtful light of a panegyric.

Light glowed in his eyes, a look of peace that Abrim had never seen there.

Dottie stood up from her hiding place behind an overturned sofa across the room, and made her way across the smashed lights and broken video equipment to his side, absently reloading from her bandoleer.

Paris in an infinite number of petty questions as to tenants, abutters, liabilities, taxes, repairs, sweepings, decorations for the Fete-Dieu, waste-pipes, lighting, projections over the public way, and the neighborhood of unhealthy buildings.

The evening light was abuzz with energy, the sky swarming up into her eyes.

Mellis false-flags Banish with his bullshit mine story if there was a claymore mine on this mountain, it would be command-detonated and Abies would have lit it off with the rest of his fireworks then leads him up to the gun site and fucking drops him cold.

It was not at the agonized contortions and posturing of the wretched boy that he was shocked, but at the cosmic obscenity of these beings which could drag to light the abysmal secrets that sleep in the unfathomed darkness of the human soul, and find pleasure in the brazen flaunting of such things as should not be hinted at, even in restless nightmares.

Pael, our tame Academician, had identified it as a fortress star from some kind of strangeness in its light.

For instance, as dust and gas from the outer layers of nearby ordinary stars fall toward the event horizon of a black hole, they are accelerated to nearly the speed of light.

I did not dare to light my lamp before this creature, and as night drew on he decided on accepting some bread and Cyprus wine, and he was afterwards obliged to do as best he could with my mattress, which was now the common bed of all new-comers.